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Open-Source Support For AMD "Richland" APUs

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  • #16
    I'd be so much more happy if finally the chipsets would be refreshed. These nuts at Asus just seemed to bring a new ITX mainboard out, upclocked CPU and GPU but no more passive cooling but then - and this is worst - with a chipset (A50M) that was recent years ago. Did they buy 10 billions of them and have to get rid of them? Why all the new CPUs but totally outdated chipsets? And selling these outdated thing still at full price.
    Having release day support is of course great (thumbs up) but as it seems the GPU is actually a generation older. (Still good for free driver support which is way better than for GCN a.t.m.)

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Adarion View Post
      I'd be so much more happy if finally the chipsets would be refreshed. These nuts at Asus just seemed to bring a new ITX mainboard out, upclocked CPU and GPU but no more passive cooling but then - and this is worst - with a chipset (A50M) that was recent years ago. Did they buy 10 billions of them and have to get rid of them? Why all the new CPUs but totally outdated chipsets? And selling these outdated thing still at full price.
      Having release day support is of course great (thumbs up) but as it seems the GPU is actually a generation older. (Still good for free driver support which is way better than for GCN a.t.m.)
      I can only see one good reason for a company to release new chipsets, and that is if new hardware specs get released... New USB specs get released. You need to support USBv3 so you release a new chipset with that ability. New SATA specs get released/ You need to support SATA6 so you release a new chipset with that ability. etc, etc, etc....

      If no new capability is available then why release a new chipset?

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      • #18
        How about:
        - chipset has a hardware bug (see Intel recently, twice)
        - product differentiation (ie this one has 20 sata ports but uses twice the power)

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        • #19
          The chipsets are already there, but nobody uses them on mainboards. A68M (aka Brazos 2.0) is perfect for little machines since it ought to use less power (less SATA ports and such) but brings you native USB 3. On the normal desktop ATX with socketed chip side you'll find all sorts of combinations now, from recent A85X down to even 7xx (from 2008) series. But all those little mini-ITX things still use A50M (besides one but that lacks passive cooling). Oh well, there might be a few unaffordable hard to find industrial mainboards around, well, and laptops but this is no use for me.

          It is not that A50M was bad, but it is by now a bit dusted and lacks native USB3. I just wonder why I don't see its successor(s) around.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Adarion View Post
            The chipsets are already there, but nobody uses them on mainboards. A68M (aka Brazos 2.0) is perfect for little machines since it ought to use less power (less SATA ports and such) but brings you native USB 3. On the normal desktop ATX with socketed chip side you'll find all sorts of combinations now, from recent A85X down to even 7xx (from 2008) series. But all those little mini-ITX things still use A50M (besides one but that lacks passive cooling). Oh well, there might be a few unaffordable hard to find industrial mainboards around, well, and laptops but this is no use for me.

            It is not that A50M was bad, but it is by now a bit dusted and lacks native USB3. I just wonder why I don't see its successor(s) around.
            ...maybe because majority of ITX mobo owners don't need USB3 anyway ?

            There are ITX mobos with USB3....even the ones with AMD E-350...

            Personally i preferred to get a mini-itx E-350 with 4 USB2 + Parellel + Serial (besides HDMI and Sub-D...Sub-D is still a must_have in Europe) than to have USB3...."native" Parallel + Serial is a must have for me.

            It's not a fanless mobo but it uses a 80mm fan (IIRC) and it's quite quiet....even when working as an HTPC...

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            • #21
              Well, once I buy something new today it should have USB3. Most have but with an external chip that might need an extra driver and that uses additional energy and is less performant.
              Anyway, your chances on standard VGA are quite good, maybe if DVI-I is there you can use an adapter. Serial is sadly becoming a rare thing but parallel (Centronics)... wow. It's a rare find on any mainboard today and even addon cards normally only have lots of serial ports but lack parallel. I guess Super-IO still support "LPT" and floppy but due to space reasons or lazyness to spend 5 cents they are not executed as pin headers or anything.
              For me serial and floppy are most welcome but increasingly hard to find, not even PCI controller cards are offered for FDDs. :/

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              • #22
                Yeah I finally just broke down and bought a USB floppy drive. It still does everything that an internal drive can do, its just less convenient. Plus the quality of the drive seems lower. It's plastic.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by AJSB View Post
                  "native" Parallel + Serial is a must have for me.
                  What have you got that plugs into parallel ports and serial ports? You might be interested in one of these:

                  http://www.jaycar.com.au/productView.asp?ID=XC4834 and http://www.aten.com/products/product...odel_no=UC232A

                  Or you could build your own:

                  http://www.google.com.au/imgres?imgu...QEwAw&dur=7713

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by madbiologist View Post
                    What have you got that plugs into parallel ports and serial ports? You might be interested in one of these:

                    http://www.jaycar.com.au/productView.asp?ID=XC4834 and http://www.aten.com/products/product...odel_no=UC232A

                    Or you could build your own:

                    http://www.google.com.au/imgres?imgu...QEwAw&dur=7713
                    Those devices works with some software, with other type of software, they are useful as a brick....we need truly native parallel/serial ports(s) in main board or else won't work....i'm talking about microcontroller stuff that is controlled at a very low level as for hardware goes (and many times even via software written in Assembler to achieve extremely precise timings)

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                    • #25
                      AMD announced the availability of the desktop "Richland" A-Series APUs on 5th June 2013. Model numbers are A10-6800K, A10-6700, A8-6600K and A8-6500. They contain Radeon HD 8670D, Radeon HD 8670D, Radeon HD 8570D and Radeon HD 8570D graphics respectively. Further specs and info about performance increases is available at http://www.amd.com/us/press-releases...013june05.aspx

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by madbiologist View Post
                        AMD announced the availability of the desktop "Richland" A-Series APUs on 5th June 2013. Model numbers are A10-6800K, A10-6700, A8-6600K and A8-6500. They contain Radeon HD 8670D, Radeon HD 8670D, Radeon HD 8570D and Radeon HD 8570D graphics respectively. Further specs and info about performance increases is available at http://www.amd.com/us/press-releases...013june05.aspx
                        The Richland series is pretty much a rebrand with slightly increased CPU and GPU frequencies. Sadly the 6800K is much more expensive than the 5800K.

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                        • #27
                          I disagree about the sadly part. This way it is much better supported on linux. I say thankfully.

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                          • #28
                            "Much more expensive"? The launch price for 5800k was 115eur, the launch price for 6800k is 125eur. Sure the 5800k is cheaper now, because AMD cut prices to sell old inventory, but the launch price going up by 10e is hardly much.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by curaga View Post
                              "Much more expensive"? The launch price for 5800k was 115eur, the launch price for 6800k is 125eur. Sure the 5800k is cheaper now, because AMD cut prices to sell old inventory, but the launch price going up by 10e is hardly much.
                              It probably depends on countries, but in France, a 5800K is about 110€ and a 6800K about 140€.

                              Originally posted by duby229 View Post
                              I disagree about the sadly part. This way it is much better supported on linux. I say thankfully.
                              The Trinity APUs also have decent open source support. Their graphics are based on the HD 6000 architecture, not HD 7000. And note that the "HD8xxx" found in the Richland APUs are still based on HD 6000s.
                              Last edited by Calinou; 06-08-2013, 10:31 AM.

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                              • #30
                                So who here has a Trinity APU based laptop and does suspend/hibernate work for you? My Asus N56DP never comes back from suspend successfully, the display never turns on. (But the system is awake, you can ssh into it, etc.)

                                I'm wondering if any of this new Richland support will also make Trinity behave better.

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