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The New R300 Register Allocator Is Still Being Developed

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  • The New R300 Register Allocator Is Still Being Developed

    Phoronix: The New R300 Register Allocator Is Still Being Developed

    Tom Stellard, the student developer who participated in last year's Google Summer of Code to improve the R300 GLSL compiler for the open-source ATI/AMD driver, is still around and contributing to upstream Mesa. Last month he announced his new R300 register allocator being ready for wider testing. He's now announced further improvements on this GPU register allocator for Mesa...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=OTM1Nw

  • #2
    Its nice with all the work being done, but isn't the performance of the R300 at an acceptable level now? Maybe focusing on code for newer chips would give more in the long run?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by crispy View Post
      Its nice with all the work being done, but isn't the performance of the R300 at an acceptable level now? Maybe focusing on code for newer chips would give more in the long run?
      At the moment, a lot of work is going into improving the core mesa functionality but using the r300-r500 chips. Some of the work is being done specifically for the r300 drivers, but a lot of it can carry over to benefit other drivers as well.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Veerappan View Post
        At the moment, a lot of work is going into improving the core mesa functionality but using the r300-r500 chips. Some of the work is being done specifically for the r300 drivers, but a lot of it can carry over to benefit other drivers as well.
        Yeah, but this work here cant right?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by crispy View Post
          Yeah, but this work here cant right?
          I'm not familiar with the code itself, but I'm guessing no. It may be useful in optimizing register allocation in general, but it might also only work for r300.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by crispy View Post
            Its nice with all the work being done, but isn't the performance of the R300 at an acceptable level now? Maybe focusing on code for newer chips would give more in the long run?
            Good grief. Stop complaining about what other people choose to spend their free time on.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by crispy View Post
              Its nice with all the work being done, but isn't the performance of the R300 at an acceptable level now? Maybe focusing on code for newer chips would give more in the long run?
              its logical to extra support r300 because r600 customers can install the catalyst.

              meybe if amd drops support on r600 the OS guys helps you out in making an extra super AAA+ driver for you

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Qaridarium View Post
                its logical to extra support r300 because r600 customers can install the catalyst.
                Yes exactly.

                But... I have an HD5770, and I REALLY don't want to install Catalyst. I think I might do it for a little while though, just to play the new Frozenbyte Humble Bundle games.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by mattst88 View Post
                  Good grief. Stop complaining about what other people choose to spend their free time on.
                  This is one of the "quirks" of open source IMO. In a world where features & quality is all that matters you simply cannot treat parts of the infrastructure as "hobby projects". Of course you cannot force people to work on certain things so....

                  And yes you can always install a blob but FOSS needs to have a feature complete graphic stack at some point.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by 89c51 View Post
                    This is one of the "quirks" of open source IMO. In a world where features & quality is all that matters you simply cannot treat parts of the infrastructure as "hobby projects".
                    It will always be a hobby project as long as it's free.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by mattst88 View Post
                      Good grief. Stop complaining about what other people choose to spend their free time on.
                      I am not complaining about his work...

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by marek View Post
                        It will always be a hobby project as long as it's free.
                        The kernel has managed to do something that the graphics people haven't. It managed to create a financially sustainable ecosystem around it that allows it to be free and open and -more important- support the people working on it. At least some of them.

                        This was presumably achieved because the kernel was cheaper and better in every way compared to the competition.

                        And thats the challenge to the graphics people. Can they create an ecosystem that can sustain itself and be attractive for companies or whatever to put their money on?

                        Wayland is getting some attention. Intel is employing the main dev and nokia people hack on it. Also they got meego running on it but thats only part of the graphic stack. Mesa/G3D needs to find a way of becoming more attractive.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by 89c51 View Post
                          The kernel has managed to do something that the graphics people haven't. It managed to create a financially sustainable ecosystem around it that allows it to be free and open and -more important- support the people working on it. At least some of them.

                          This was presumably achieved because the kernel was cheaper and better in every way compared to the competition.

                          And thats the challenge to the graphics people. Can they create an ecosystem that can sustain itself and be attractive for companies or whatever to put their money on?

                          Wayland is getting some attention. Intel is employing the main dev and nokia people hack on it. Also they got meego running on it but thats only part of the graphic stack. Mesa/G3D needs to find a way of becoming more attractive.
                          You seem to think that somehow the open source stack will die if it doesn't achieve this. It won't there will always be people willing to hack on open source graphics drivers, there is a sustainable ecosystem its just no producing things at the same level as dedicated 100 man teams, but the thing is that doesn't directly affect the developer ecosystem. Some distros cannot ship binary drivers no matter what they do, so there will always exist a market for open source drivers. Now they may not have the featureset that people on here care about but that doesn't actually matter to the sustainability.

                          Dave.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by airlied View Post
                            You seem to think that somehow the open source stack will die if it doesn't achieve this. It won't there will always be people willing to hack on open source graphics drivers, there is a sustainable ecosystem its just no producing things at the same level as dedicated 100 man teams, but the thing is that doesn't directly affect the developer ecosystem. Some distros cannot ship binary drivers no matter what they do, so there will always exist a market for open source drivers. Now they may not have the featureset that people on here care about but that doesn't actually matter to the sustainability.

                            Dave.
                            No. Nothing will die. As you wrote there will always be people willing to hack. My post was only a thought on how it can be enhanced in a way that will be beneficial for the devs -jobs & steady income- and for the users -features-. This lack of manpower is hurting everything and the best way to attract people is money.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by airlied View Post
                              You seem to think that somehow the open source stack will die if it doesn't achieve this. It won't there will always be people willing to hack on open source graphics drivers, there is a sustainable ecosystem its just no producing things at the same level as dedicated 100 man teams
                              When AMD or Intel releases a new CPU, Linux supports it with little to no effort as long as you don't need it to take advantage of new instructions and such. The same can not be said of graphics, unless drivers are written for each new generation they won't work at all. Of course code doesn't disappear but if you measure the quality of drivers compared to how recent the generation is, then yes it might certainly regress not just stagnate.

                              The R500 is now the 5th most recent generation after N. Islands, Evergreen, R700 and R600, when Southern Islands is released they'd be the 6th most recent. Unless new code is written fast enough to keep up Linux will only function well on graphics cards found in museums and not on recent PCs. So I disagree with you, there's certainly a critical mass and below that things get worse, not better. And vendors willing to disclose their specs, of course - I think if AMD changed their mind you'd agree things would go downhill, fast.

                              That said, I don't think now is the time to be glum, it looks a lot better today than back in 2007 when AMD first opened their specs. Back then I seem to remember everyone serious being on closed nVidia/ATI drivers, while the few people on open Intel drivers just wanted to get a picture. Now the graphics stack is starting to look like the 21st century and the generations of backlog the open source team has had is shrinking. But then when you start at the bottom, I guess there's no other way than up either...

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