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  • Open-Source AMD Cayman GPU KMS Support

    Phoronix: Open-Source AMD Cayman GPU KMS Support

    Nearly two months ago AMD released Radeon HD 6000 series open-source support -- complete with kernel mode-setting and Mesa/Gallium3D OpenGL driver acceleration support -- but this support had only covered the "Northern Islands" ASICs and not the newest Radeon HD 6900 "Cayman" graphics processors. Cayman's design is much different from the Northern Islands and previous-generation Evergreen GPUs, but the open-source support for these highest-end AMD graphics processors is beginning to emerge...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=OTE2NA

  • #2
    Thanks for the info!

    Some feedback (try 2, with thoughts better organized):

    Has it occurred to you to start putting all of your benchmarking results over on openbenchmarking.org, even the ones you run in-house manually? Separation of concerns and all that.

    But even with all your benchmark results shifted over there, it's exactly this kind of article that keeps me coming back to Phoronix. Summarizing info about happenings in the Linux performance / graphics / gaming / open source driver communities. Finding out about things I don't necessarily hear first-hand. This is why I don't want you to retire from being a Phoronix editor; or if you do, replace yourself with people who can capably fill your shoes as far as finding these excellent tidbits.

    It's a news site, so give us more news. Thumbs-up for this post and others like it. The benchmarks can go "to that other site you run"

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    • #3
      FWIW, initial EXA/Xv accel code is up on the cayman_accel branch of the ddx:
      http://cgit.freedesktop.org/xorg/dri...h=cayman_accel
      It doesn't work without hanging the GPU yet, but it's mostly all in place.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by agd5f View Post
        FWIW, initial EXA/Xv accel code is up on the cayman_accel branch of the ddx:
        http://cgit.freedesktop.org/xorg/dri...h=cayman_accel
        It doesn't work without hanging the GPU yet, but it's mostly all in place.
        Alex, that is wonderful. I can't imagine someone would use 69xx with r600g, but it is a certainly solid base for the future AMD GPUS.

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        • #5
          Sweet, really sweet, but you don't buy 300$ card to use with opensource drivers. Wasn't this official position?

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by crazycheese View Post
            Sweet, really sweet, but you don't buy 300$ card to use with opensource drivers. Wasn't this official position?
            Whether someone does this or not, the open drivers should provide decent support for all the AMD hardware, which forms a good basis for the community to keep working on the drivers.

            This is great news indeed.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by crazycheese View Post
              Sweet, really sweet, but you don't buy 300$ card to use with opensource drivers. Wasn't this official position?
              If you run a LiveCD, it's better to have an optimized driver than only vesa. And, if we want later 3D acceleration, this is a mandatory step to do.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by whitecat View Post
                If you run a LiveCD, it's better to have an optimized driver than only vesa. And, if we want later 3D acceleration, this is a mandatory step to do.
                GPL does not prevent usage of proprietary crap as basis(library, module etc), it does prevent inclusion of GPL code inside of proprietary crap. This means nothing except blob license itself prevents you to put fglrx or nvblob on livecd.

                You can wait for you acceleration for 10 years, this is officially a legacy unsupported driver.

                Originally posted by pingufunkybeat View Post
                Whether someone does this or not, the open drivers should provide decent support for all the AMD hardware, which forms a good basis for the community to keep working on the drivers.

                This is great news indeed.
                Open drivers ... with decent support ... for all AMD hardware will take 15 years to accomplish, granted the development of AMD hardware will be frozen for that 15 years. AMD indeed deserves respect for documentation and some background support behind Gallium and FOSS drivers, but they do not consider this any serious.

                This is like publishing "Learn to pilot the plane for dummies" book vs providing the plane itself.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by crazycheese View Post
                  This means nothing except blob license itself prevents you to put fglrx or nvblob on livecd.

                  You can wait for you acceleration for 10 years
                  On the other side, if I want fglrx in a Fedora LiveCD, I will wait an infinite time... but, by the way, I don't want fglrx in Fedora LiveCD.

                  Originally posted by crazycheese View Post
                  This is like publishing "Learn to pilot the plane for dummies" book vs providing the plane itself.
                  From my own experience, the provided plane itself tends to crash more often. So I prefer an older reliable plane.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by whitecat View Post
                    On the other side, if I want fglrx in a Fedora LiveCD, I will wait an infinite time... but, by the way, I don't want fglrx in Fedora LiveCD.

                    From my own experience, the provided plane itself tends to crash more often. So I prefer an older reliable plane.
                    Barely anyone wants fglrx. Barely AMD cares about it.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by crazycheese View Post
                      Open drivers ... with decent support ... for all AMD hardware will take 15 years to accomplish, granted the development of AMD hardware will be frozen for that 15 years.
                      Depends on what you need. r600g is good enough for me at this moment, on 2-year old hardware. Everything else is a welcome bonus, but I can use my computer.

                      2 years ago, I couldn't. With an nvidia card, I still wouldn't be able to use it.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by crazycheese View Post
                        Sweet, really sweet, but you don't buy 300$ card to use with opensource drivers. Wasn't this official position?
                        There exist people who use Linux to do work, and when they want to play games, boot into GameLoaderOS™. Certainly having basic out-of-thebox 2D and 3D acceleration will be sufficient here. The proprietary driver would just limit the kernel/X server versions that you can run.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by crazycheese View Post
                          Open drivers ... with decent support ... for all AMD hardware will take 15 years to accomplish, granted the development of AMD hardware will be frozen for that 15 years. AMD indeed deserves respect for documentation and some background support behind Gallium and FOSS drivers, but they do not consider this any serious.
                          I ordered an AMD Zacate mobo (ASRock E350M1) the first day it was listed at e-tailers. Open source drivers enabled me to use it for all my needs on the same day when it arrived, with 2D and 3D acceleration (well actually the next day as the first was spent by Gentoo compiling).

                          Other people may have different use cases (video decode acceleration, OpenGL 3, ...) but for me it was more than decent.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by chithanh View Post
                            There exist people who use Linux to do work, and when they want to play games, boot into GameLoaderOS™. Certainly having basic out-of-thebox 2D and 3D acceleration will be sufficient here. The proprietary driver would just limit the kernel/X server versions that you can run.
                            Your definition of "work" only needs framebuffer. WINE runs very fine with nvidiablob. In fact so fine, you don't need GameLoaderOS at all. AMD recommends you to install GameLoaderOS and have only ~1/3 subset of features in Linux your card is capable of, or 3/4 of features and crashes; while Nvidia recommends you to install proprietary driver and card will work, unless you touch multiscreen.

                            Of couse, this is due to nvidia having same windows and unix driver under the hood as well as various bugfixes for GameLoaderOS that even apply on Wine, but the AMD proprietary driver they are forcing on people instead of opensource is just a subset of nvidia.

                            Originally posted by chithanh View Post
                            I ordered an AMD Zacate mobo (ASRock E350M1) the first day it was listed at e-tailers. Open source drivers enabled me to use it for all my needs on the same day when it arrived, with 2D and 3D acceleration (well actually the next day as the first was spent by Gentoo compiling).

                            Other people may have different use cases (video decode acceleration, OpenGL 3, ...) but for me it was more than decent.
                            You don't use zacate for its primary case - video decode acceleration? Already outdated ion beats zacate on linux in every possible way. "Thanks" to drivers. You could save money and just buy low-entry athlon II and add first generation Radeon for the same result in linux. Luckily processors don't need extra drivers of such extent, otherwise you would just have to use GameLoaderOS for anything x86 related and also accept this just as you accept current situation.

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                            • #15
                              I do use OpenGL compositing with kwin, which is not possible without 3D acceleration. And wine supports only a selection of some new and many old games. Plus, it requires 32 bit compatibility libraries which I do not want to pollute my 64 bit Linux system with.

                              You say that the primary case for zacate is video decode acceleration, but I think there is no basis for that claim. It is one use case of many and not relevant for productivity.

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