Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

A Major Open-Source ATI Linux Driver Update

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #21
    Originally posted by Welsh Dwarf View Post
    OK, this isn't a troll but a genuine question.
    no one is a troll only the people how talk someone is a troll are real trolls.


    Originally posted by Welsh Dwarf View Post
    I'm in the market for a new laptop (4Go ram + Intel core i5 probably) and I'm wondering what to do about graphics.
    step away from intel if you don't wana use the intel IGP the only intel notebook with an real solution for opensource is the bigfat Corei7 notebook without any intel IGP on the chip with an real AMD GPU card.
    but thats really to much in price. really.

    also step away from any hybried graphik solutions also on amd side.
    one of the best solutions for opensource and openCL is the AMD fusion system.

    the amd fusion supports 16gb of ram in 2 SO-dimm sockets and you can use the full 16gb for openCL apps on top of the GPU.

    no other solution gives you more VRAM for OpenCL on the GPU.
    if you run openCL apps with havy ram usage the fusion is the KING per WATT usage.
    thats the point why nvidia sell Tesla cards with 12gb Vram.
    thats because on openCL only RAM matters.


    Originally posted by Welsh Dwarf View Post
    I used to be hard core NVidia due to the blob being generally considered more stable by the Internet (please feel free to prove me wrong though).

    Recently though, 3 things have made me hesitate:
    1) KMS and such goodies not being available in the blob
    2) r600g looking a lot more mature than nouveau (no offense to the nouveau guys, you're doing a great job considering)
    3) NVidia Optimus
    nvidia do have some other problems they slowdown 64bit calculations on geforce cards you only get 1/8 of the speed.
    and thats not all they sell tesla cards with 12gb vram but the geforces only get 512/1gb/1,5gb.

    you lose any openCL benchmark if 64bit is used in the calculation and if your calculation need much RAM.




    Originally posted by Welsh Dwarf View Post
    I know that hybrid graphics are coming to the ati side of things as well, but they generally seem better supported than optimus (where you just get all the power drain of the NVidia GPU with all the performance of the intel GPU built into the chipset).
    I'd be manly coding but I do like to game from time to time (the most demanding games being SC2/WoW under wine).
    Does any one have any experience with this / any tips on choosing my setup.
    TIA
    David
    i strongly recommend an Amd fusion system.

    and put an fast SSD in it and 16gb of fast ddr3 ram (8gb per module).

    Comment


    • #22
      For the Radeon HD 6000 series only up to the 6870 models are supported, correct?
      Has AMD mentioned any updates regarding the 6900 models yet?

      Comment


      • #23
        Originally posted by BlueJayofEvil View Post
        For the Radeon HD 6000 series only up to the 6870 models are supported, correct?
        Has AMD mentioned any updates regarding the 6900 models yet?
        That's correct. When the rest of the 6xxx support was announced, Bridgman mentioned 6900 support would probably be 1-3 months, which would place it right about in time for the 2.6.39 kernel. But who knows, i haven't heard any information since then and it could go slower than expected.

        Comment


        • #24
          Originally posted by smitty3268 View Post
          That's correct. When the rest of the 6xxx support was announced, Bridgman mentioned 6900 support would probably be 1-3 months, which would place it right about in time for the 2.6.39 kernel. But who knows, i haven't heard any information since then and it could go slower than expected.
          Alex has modesetting and shadowfb running on HD69xx, but there's more work required to get acceleration going. If it looks like acceleration is going to take a long time we may push out the modesetting/shadowfb code first, otherwise we'll hold off and put them out together

          Comment


          • #25
            Originally posted by Svartalf View Post
            Depends on the applications and if you're doing something like Compiz. For some applications, it'll bring a good boost in performance. For others, not so much so (as you found in your testing...).
            If that's the case then it shouldn't be that hard for Michael to come up with a benchmark showing that pageflipping indeed 'dramatically speeds up the performance'.

            Because right now as I see it the only basis for his claims are that newer versions of mesa+kernel+ddx are faster in some benchmarks than stock Ubuntu 10.10, and then somehow he arrives at attributing these performance gains to pageflipping.

            How is a big mystery to me. Perhaps it was written in the stars, or his deck of tarot cards told him so .

            The way I see it is that the idea of pageflipping bringing performance gains is nice in theory, but doesn't work in practice, at least not with the open source drivers in my experience. I'd love to be proven wrong though.

            Comment


            • #26
              Maybe some of the devs can explain better why the gain is not that much. From my prespective it is because, framebuffer copy is GPU intensive operation, but the driver is CPU saturated, so GPU has plenty of time to do "unnessesary" things, such as framebuffer coping. Now fgrlx, is way more opitimized, so GPU has no time to do such vram mastrubations.

              Comment


              • #27
                Pageflipping is mainly useful for reducing memory bandwidth and decreasing latency in the 3D pipeline. If you aren't using pageflipping, you have to blit the back buffer to the front buffer which takes both memory bandwidth and 3D engine time. With pageflipping you just update the front and back buffer pointers. The DRI2 code in the xserver doesn't currently provide a mechanism to do non-vsynced pageflipping. This would provide maximum framerates at the expense of display tearing.

                Comment


                • #28
                  Originally posted by agd5f View Post
                  The DRI2 code in the xserver doesn't currently provide a mechanism to do non-vsynced pageflipping.
                  You mean the display server enforces a sane model for updating the display? What a ridiculous idea.

                  Comment


                  • #29
                    Originally posted by agd5f View Post
                    The DRI2 code in the xserver doesn't currently provide a mechanism to do non-vsynced pageflipping.
                    LOL wow nice an anti phoronix-benchmark feature... michael really goes bankrupt with this radeon driver...

                    this anti benchmark features really kill the Penis enlargement of some Nvidia users LOL...

                    Comment


                    • #30
                      Most of the performance loss of 6.13.2 has disappeared with this. Props on that!

                      6.14 is still not as fast as 6.13.1 was, so I guess there's still some tuning the VRAM heuristics left.


                      [r700 hd4350 web-browsing, if you're curious]

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X