Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The ATI R600g Driver Gets Boosted By A New Design

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • The ATI R600g Driver Gets Boosted By A New Design

    Phoronix: The ATI R600g Driver Gets Boosted By A New Design

    We've said it a few times already that the R600g driver continues to advance, but this open-source Gallium3D graphics driver that provides hardware acceleration for ATI R600/R700/Evergreen ASICs (the Radeon HD 2000/3000/4000/5000 graphics cards) has now received another huge boost with what has been dubbed as the "new design" and with the latest Mesa Git code these new code paths are used by default...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=ODYzOQ

  • #2
    when it will be in ubu repositories?

    Comment


    • #3
      Dear Michael,

      Could you make a article about all the graphic stack?
      I'm almost sure I'm not the only one in this situation, but even if I have a strong knowledge in development, I'm not familiar with all the "Mesa", "Gallium", "Stack", "R{300,600}", R{300,600}g", "HD 2000/3000/4000/5000", "ASIC", the name of the proprietary drivers and the open-sourced ones, the state of all the open-sourced drivers and, eventually, what are the links between all of these?

      I'm sure you're one of the best person to explain this and I'm sure it will help us to understand how important a news is.

      Thanks,
      Creak

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Creak View Post
        Dear Michael,

        Could you make a article about all the graphic stack?
        I'm almost sure I'm not the only one in this situation, but even if I have a strong knowledge in development, I'm not familiar with all the "Mesa", "Gallium", "Stack", "R{300,600}", R{300,600}g", "HD 2000/3000/4000/5000", "ASIC", the name of the proprietary drivers and the open-sourced ones, the state of all the open-sourced drivers and, eventually, what are the links between all of these?

        I'm sure you're one of the best person to explain this and I'm sure it will help us to understand how important a news is.

        Thanks,
        Creak
        These terms are explained again and again in the articles and the forum. Please search there, and do not make Michael to explain the same things over 6 months.

        Comment


        • #5
          improvement, 3d performance-wise i hope.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by b4283 View Post
            improvement, 3d performance-wise i hope.
            It helps to read the article.

            Really, it's only about 10 sentences long. It's not that hard

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Creak View Post
              I'm not familiar with all the "Mesa", "Gallium", "Stack", "R{300,600}", R{300,600}g", "HD 2000/3000/4000/5000", "ASIC", the name of the proprietary drivers and the open-sourced ones, the state of all the open-sourced drivers and, eventually, what are the links between all of these?
              I'll do it:

              Mesa is the free software 3D graphics rendering API that should work like OpenGL.

              Gallium3D is the new free software graphics driver architecture developped by the Tungsten Graphics guys who now work at VMWare. It is needed to have this architecture for modern, shader based graphics cards and to keep the amount of work that needs to be done to get to a minimum level of support as low as possible.

              Stack reffers to a couple of drivers. There is no such thing as 'One driver to rules them all'. On Windows you also don't install one graphics driver, but a set/stack of drivers, even though you just download what seems to be one driver. You have a DirectX driver, an OpenGL driver, a 2D driver, a video playtback driver, etc.

              R300c, R300g, R600c, R600g are just names for GPU drivers. 'R' stands for Radeon, '300/600/700' or whatever number stands for the GPU architecture (for example the ATI Radeon 9800 pro has a 350 core). 'c' stands for Mesa Classic (the old driver architecture) and 'g' stands for Gallium3D (the new driver architecture).

              HD 2000/3000/5000 stand for AMD HD Radeon 2xxx, 3xxx, 5xxxx series graphics cards.

              ASIC stands for "Application-specific integrated circuit". See Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Applica...grated_circuit

              Comment


              • #8
                Thanks V!ncent for taking the time to explain all this!

                Drago, I don't read the forum very often. I know, my mistake, but I don't have the time to filter the interesting posts in the 10 pages of each news. If so much people ask for explanations, maybe it's better to create a glossary instead...

                Comment


                • #9
                  I've got a Radeon HD 4850.

                  Does anyone know how good the support for this (and similar) card(s) is in the latest versions of all components?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by sturmflut View Post
                    I've got a Radeon HD 4850.

                    Does anyone know how good the support for this (and similar) card(s) is in the latest versions of all components?
                    You card is r700: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radeon_R700#Architecture

                    "Ta-da": http://www.x.org/wiki/RadeonFeature
                    (If it's updated, but it seems it is)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by pingufunkybeat View Post
                      It helps to read the article.

                      Really, it's only about 10 sentences long. It's not that hard
                      No, i did read it, didn't mention anything 'bout 3Ds.
                      Or that it did but vaporized in front of my gauche eyes, please enlighten me.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by sturmflut View Post
                        I've got a Radeon HD 4850.

                        Does anyone know how good the support for this (and similar) card(s) is in the latest versions of all components?
                        If you use the classic Mesa driver (r600c) + latest X driver + latest kernel:

                        - OpenGL 2.1
                        - Profile-based powersaving works well. Dynamic powersaving works, but is glitchy
                        - Desktop effects work great
                        - Most games work, see the matrix here: http://www.x.org/wiki/RadeonProgram
                        - Performance is not fantastic. Things are considerably slower than with the proprietary driver, but playable (I've just finished Doom3 on high quality on my budget $40 card)

                        With the r600g driver, it should be similar, but somewhat slower and buggier. However, the future development will concentrate on this driver, and it should exceed the classic driver significantly in the future.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by b4283 View Post
                          No, i did read it, didn't mention anything 'bout 3Ds.
                          Or that it did but vaporized in front of my gauche eyes, please enlighten me.
                          It's a 3d driver

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by V!NCENT View Post
                            Stack reffers to a couple of drivers. There is no such thing as 'One driver to rules them all'. On Windows you also don't install one graphics driver, but a set/stack of drivers, even though you just download what seems to be one driver. You have a DirectX driver, an OpenGL driver, a 2D driver, a video playtback driver, etc.
                            That's a bit of an awkward/inaccurate explanation of a "stack". I've always understood a "stack" more literally as a pile of things on top of each other and you need to make it through ALL of them before you can meet your objective....

                            I.e. a single branch within a dependency tree would represent that leaf's stack.... leaf --> parent --> parent's parent --> hardware, etc. That leaf's sibling isn't a member of the same stack. So you've got the mesa stack, you've got the video playback stack, you've got the 2d stack, etc. There are common functions within each of these stacks, but the stacks are separate stacks within the same overall driver architecture.


                            Real world example....
                            The "drive a car" stack:
                            1) you, the driver,
                            depends on
                            2) the car,
                            depends on,
                            3) the fuel,
                            depends on,
                            4) the gas station,
                            depends on,
                            5) the fuel refinery,
                            depends on,
                            6) the crude,
                            depends on
                            7) the military

                            Your neighbor's backup generator stack doesn't involve you or your car, but shares the fuel stack in common.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              @Droidhacker; I know that. Everything that makes up the graphical stack; X.org, KMS, whatnot.

                              But that's out of the scope for newbies... and especialy in this context...

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X