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A Detailed Look At The ATI Linux Power Management

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  • A Detailed Look At The ATI Linux Power Management

    Phoronix: A Detailed Look At The ATI Linux Power Management

    Last week we reported that the open-source ATI Linux driver had picked up improved power management in the form of dynamic power management and power management profiles that can be defined by the end-user. With the ATI Linux power management finally coming to fruition within the Linux kernel for its kernel mode-setting / DRM driver, we have decided to take a close look at how this power management support is working in the real world.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=14913

  • #2
    Interesting, but the video card is a bit old.

    It would be nice to see the advancements with latest R600/R700 chips, expecially compared to fglrx.

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    • #3
      congrats, but you have missed the most important part: how long the battery lasts with those configurations.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by blackshard View Post
        Interesting, but the video card is a bit old.

        It would be nice to see the advancements with latest R600/R700 chips, expecially compared to fglrx.
        No access to R600/700 laptops
        Michael Larabel
        http://www.michaellarabel.com/

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        • #5
          Nice article, Michael!

          I'd like to see some comparison with an old distribution with fglrx working. (->dynamic voltage comparison)

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          • #6
            Unfortunately, as the proprietary ATI Catalyst Linux driver dropped support for the R500 ASICs -- thus the Mobility Radeon X1400 included -- we are unable to see how the power performance of the open-source driver stack now compares to the Catalyst driver that fully implements PowerPlay and other energy savings techniques.
            Why not comparing the results with tests under 8.04 LTS or 8.10 with fglrx?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Michael View Post
              No access to R600/700 laptops
              Then use an old fglrx that support R500.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Michael View Post
                No access to R600/700 laptops
                Why must it be a laptop?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by droidhacker View Post
                  Why must it be a laptop?
                  Probably because only laptops have power saving capabilities.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by NSLW View Post
                    Probably because only laptops have power saving capabilities.
                    That's among the weirdest technical claims I've heard thus far.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by droidhacker View Post
                      Why must it be a laptop?
                      To easily and accurately compare the power consumption.
                      Michael Larabel
                      http://www.michaellarabel.com/

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Michael View Post
                        To easily and accurately compare the power consumption.
                        So summa summarum this saves power on all platforms but actual savings are only easy to determine on laptops?

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                        • #13
                          Most power management implementations turn on more aggressive power saving functions when running in battery mode.

                          Desktop systems tend not to have battery mode - but IIRC all of the test results in this article were made when running on battery.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by bridgman View Post
                            Desktop systems tend not to have battery mode - but IIRC all of the test results in this article were made when running on battery.
                            UPS counts as battery too there then, I think. Might also be possible to trick the system into thinking it's running on battery with some hackery. (virtual battery whose power level you could change should be interesting for power management benchmarking since then you could see if different power management levels are triggered on different battery levels)

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                            • #15
                              I was under the impression that UPS mode was more like a pending shutdown than a low power mode; or maybe this is something new that I hadn't heard about

                              Are you saying that "UPS mode" uses the same ACPI messages/whatever as an AC-to-battery transition in a laptop ? Is that separate from the "you might wanna be shutting down before I takes your power away" mode ?

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