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ATI's Gallium3D Driver Is Still Playing Catch-Up

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  • ATI's Gallium3D Driver Is Still Playing Catch-Up

    Phoronix: ATI's Gallium3D Driver Is Still Playing Catch-Up

    Yesterday we delivered benchmarks showing how the open-source ATI Radeon graphics driver stack in Ubuntu 10.04 is comparing to older releases of the proprietary ATI Catalyst Linux driver. Sadly, the latest open-source ATI driver still is no match even for a two or four-year-old proprietary driver from ATI/AMD, but that is with the classic Mesa DRI driver. To yesterday's results we have now added in our results from ATI's Gallium3D (R300g) driver using a Mesa 7.9-devel Git snapshot from yesterday to see how this runs against the older Catalyst drivers.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=14757

  • #2
    Awesome. Basically, Galium3D >= Radeon for R500. What's the status of Gallium 3D for R600/700 in terms of 3D accel? Thanks!

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    • #3
      Originally posted by mendieta View Post
      What's the status of Gallium 3D for R600/700 in terms of 3D accel?
      Uhm... I guess glxgears
      ## VGA ##
      AMD: X1950XTX, HD3870, HD5870
      Intel: GMA45, HD3000 (Core i5 2500K)

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      • #4
        did any work go into optimizing, or is it only work on features right now?
        what im acutally asking is, if we can expect performance jumps if somebody if one of the developers found time to spend on optimizing the drivers?

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        • #5
          edit:
          did any work go into optimizing, or is it only work on features right now?
          what im acutally asking is, if we can expect performance jumps if one of the developers found time to spend on optimizing the drivers?


          i hate the edit function.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Pfanne View Post
            edit:
            did any work go into optimizing, or is it only work on features right now?
            what im acutally asking is, if we can expect performance jumps if one of the developers found time to spend on optimizing the drivers?


            i hate the edit function.
            The work is being done on all fronts.

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            • #7
              Wow! G3D equals or beats classic mesa in all tests and even surpasses fglrx in some... yet the article is titled "playing Catch-Up".

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              • #8
                It's either old X.org and less stable drivers on less distro's Vs some realy nice drivers without downsides although a little later on features and speed.

                What about OpenCL though? Is that just raw power using of the GPU or will OpenCL be slower with the state tracker too?

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                • #9
                  I expect OpenCL performance is going to be driven by two things - shader compiler efficiency packing multiple instructions into a VLIW, and memory manager maturity. Both are hard but not impossible, and I *think* the OpenCL use cases should be less varied than OpenGL and easier to deal with. Other than that, raw power of the GPU should drive things.

                  Remember that there hasn't been a lot of optimization on the Gallium3D code base yet, just a push to get to classic Mesa levels so that 300g can replace 300.

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                  • #10
                    BTW the shape of the resolution vs performance curves (generally flat) indicates that performance is basically CPU limited right now, so a round of profiling and optimizing should make a hefty difference. The question is whether the bulk of the CPU time is being used in the HW driver stack or in the upper level Mesa code.

                    I'm not sure which of those to hope for

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by bridgman View Post
                      I expect OpenCL performance is going to be driven by two things - shader compiler efficiency packing multiple instructions into a VLIW, and memory manager maturity. Both are hard but not impossible, and I *think* the OpenCL use cases should be less varied than OpenGL and easier to deal with. Other than that, raw power of the GPU should drive things.
                      That was what I was hoping for

                      Remember that there hasn't been a lot of optimization on the Gallium3D code base yet, just a push to get to classic Mesa levels so that 300g can replace 300.
                      What do you mean by 'the' Gallium3D code base? KMS+Mesa? KMS+rxxxg+Mese? Or everything related to a r300GPU to make 3D work?

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                      • #12
                        I was referring to the parts which are different between 300c and 300g, ie mostly the mesa-core-to-gallium3d interface and the 300g driver itself (since that's the part which affects classic vs gallium3d performance) but I don't think any parts of the stack have really been optimized much yet. The focus has been primarily on getting functionality in place on the new architecture so that there's something worth optimizing

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                        • #13
                          lol a little offtopic but i just noticed Bridgman, that your location is toronto-ish. Markham boy are we ? Fuck i would do anything to stay home in the dot right now, Montreal is a fucking dump .

                          Good to see G3D isnt a total flop. If what you say about the bottleneck is valid and the performance can be jumped then by all means you have made a customer out of good ole L33F3R.

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                          • #14
                            By and large, the performance improvements have been to core parts of the Gallium interface. I am planning to have a GSoC student to work on GL 2.x features to flesh that out, but as far as performance goes, it's largely hit-and-miss. I can think of only a couple spots that can really get sped up, and those will come relatively soon.

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                            • #15
                              this is great news! thanks to everyone involved in making those ati chips work again with an open driver!

                              are there any tutorials on how to install this awesome thing on ubuntu without breaking the package management/etc? i'm aware of the fact that this is still considered unstable software.

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