Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Best bang for buck with open source drivers.

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    noone said wine was a gaming solution. When i say works i mean has an enjoyable framerate with minimal problems. Im no hardcore gamer anymore so I dont feel its worth my time to restart every time I want to play a small game. With the binary driver i have the option to use wine, with the open source driver i dont. The binary driver has given 'ME" more freedom dispite being closed source.

    One good thing about linux is choice. You want an open source driver to run fast 2D and to aid in kernel upgrades, thats cool. I want 3D, so i pick the closed source. Its fine to say wine hinders linux porting projects but to say its garbage in the middle of a debate about driver performance is in itself a fallacy.

    Comment


    • #32
      Originally posted by Melcar View Post
      If he can get a x1950xt for less than $30, that would be a deal. Besides, who needs WINE for games? It never works. If you really want to play Windows games, make yourself an extra Windows partition.
      That's my sentiment exactly, though I have to admit there is a slight problem with this thinking. We still need to support gaming on linux. However the best way to do that is to buy games that will be counted as a linux sale. Playing a video game in wine is not going to do that.

      Comment


      • #33
        Originally posted by L33F3R View Post
        noone said wine was a gaming solution. When i say works i mean has an enjoyable framerate with minimal problems. Im no hardcore gamer anymore so I dont feel its worth my time to restart every time I want to play a small game. With the binary driver i have the option to use wine, with the open source driver i dont. The binary driver has given 'ME" more freedom dispite being closed source.

        One good thing about linux is choice. You want an open source driver to run fast 2D and to aid in kernel upgrades, thats cool. I want 3D, so i pick the closed source. Its fine to say wine hinders linux porting projects but to say its garbage in the middle of a debate about driver performance is in itself a fallacy.
        I have to admit that I believe that wines utter dependence on the behavior exhibited by nvidia blob is indeed a design flaw. It's one thing to say that wine works well with nvidias driver, its something totally different and wrong to say that it is because of the driver..

        Comment


        • #34
          Originally posted by duby229 View Post
          That's my sentiment exactly, though I have to admit there is a slight problem with this thinking. We still need to support gaming on linux. However the best way to do that is to buy games that will be counted as a linux sale. Playing a video game in wine is not going to do that.

          I don't use WINE because of that. Don't even bother with new Windows titles. The bulk of my gaming is done with cross-platform games. However, a person is free to do whatever he wants with his PC (that's still true, right?), so if he wants to play Windows games then he may as well get the most out of his hardware and enjoy said game, and for that just getting Windows is the best solution.
          Last edited by Melcar; 06-02-2009, 09:41 PM.

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by duby229 View Post
            We still need to support gaming on linux. However the best way to do that is to buy games that will be counted as a linux sale. Playing a video game in wine is not going to do that.
            absolutely correct.

            Comment


            • #36
              Check this out guys

              SAPPHIRE Radeon HD 4850 100245HDMI Video Card

              EDIT, click on the third image of the card

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by duby229 View Post
                click on the third image of the card
                lol very nice. major props for discovering this delicious easter egg.

                Comment


                • #38
                  edited. Sorry this post was not necessary

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by frische View Post
                    1. somehow the nvidia blob works with every new solaris kernel
                    2. and they even ship it on the livecd
                    3. ...damn
                    Afaik due to license differences and the fact that Solaris kernel has a stable API for drivers. Solaris license has no issues whatsoever with closed drivers.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by nanonyme View Post
                      Afaik due to license differences and the fact that Solaris kernel has a stable API for drivers. Solaris license has no issues whatsoever with closed drivers.
                      And, because Linux doesn't have (?) stable API nvidia drivers don't work with every release? Stable, when comes to Solaris can also mean old, crappy etc. in this case. There were Linux distros which provided nvidia binary blobs on live cd, but I don't know if this was license violation.
                      Last edited by kraftman; 07-01-2009, 04:59 AM.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by kraftman View Post
                        And, because Linux doesn't have (?) stable API nvidia drivers don't work with every license? Stable, when comes to Solaris can also mean old, crappy etc. in this case. There were Linux distros which provided nvidia binary blobs on live cd, but I don't know if this was license violation.
                        No, rather the API changes rapidly so nVidia and ATi have to port their drivers to each and every individual Linux kernel version whereas with Solaris kernel I've gotten the impression the drivers just work with new kernel versions. I've been told this is a good thing because it discourages writing closed source kernel modules.
                        The license/freeness thing was related more to the the drivers not getting shipped with the LiveCD's. It might be though that I'm wrong on this second part and it's a deliberate choice that LiveCD's don't usually come with proprietary drivers.
                        Last edited by nanonyme; 06-30-2009, 05:32 PM.

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by kraftman View Post
                          And, because Linux doesn't have (?) stable API nvidia drivers don't work with every license? Stable, when comes to Solaris can also mean old, crappy etc. in this case. There were Linux distros which provided nvidia binary blobs on live cd, but I don't know if this was license violation.
                          The problem with so called "stable" APIs is that they may have unresolved bugs and design flaws go unfixed for years in the name of compatibility. I dont know of many APIs that are stable especially ones that have gone unchanged for years on end. I dont think "stable" is quite the proper term to use... Stable appears to be an antonym in this case...

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Originally posted by nanonyme View Post
                            No, rather the API changes rapidly so nVidia and ATi have to port their drivers to each and every individual Linux kernel version whereas with Solaris kernel I've gotten the impression the drivers just work with new kernel versions. I've been told this is a good thing because it discourages writing closed source kernel modules.
                            The license/freeness thing was related more to the the drivers not getting shipped with the LiveCD's. It might be though that I'm wrong on this second part and it's a deliberate choice that LiveCD's don't usually come with proprietary drivers.
                            I actually develop a LiveCD for my own personal use. I keep it updated on a regular basis, and with all of the tools and stuff I need to do my job. Even though I am the only person who will ever use this livecd I chose not to use the proprietary drivers simply because the open drivers are far more stable. See theres that word stable. Stable in this case actually means something valuable. Even though the code is highly experimental with a with a bunch of brand new activity in every part of the stack.... Even through all of this it is still more stable than the proprietary drivers. That says something important that we all need to pay attention to.

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Originally posted by duby229 View Post
                              The problem with so called "stable" APIs is that they may have unresolved bugs and design flaws go unfixed for years in the name of compatibility. I dont know of many APIs that are stable especially ones that have gone unchanged for years on end. I dont think "stable" is quite the proper term to use... Stable appears to be an antonym in this case...
                              Stable in this term pretty much means "does not change", I think. Stuff gets fixed behind the API, the API itself remains static. And yes, now you do know at least one. Solaris. Anyway, this is getting plenty offtopic, I just meant to reply to a post that there's a good reason nVidia kernel modules work with new Solaris kernel versions always...

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Originally posted by nanonyme View Post
                                Stable in this term pretty much means "does not change", I think. Stuff gets fixed behind the API, the API itself remains static. And yes, now you do know at least one. Solaris. Anyway, this is getting plenty offtopic, I just meant to reply to a post that there's a good reason nVidia kernel modules work with new Solaris kernel versions always...
                                I peice of junk that doesnt change is still a peice of junk. If you have an API with a function that is used by 20% of the applications that use that API, and later on find out that function can be used to exploit the system for something, in a so called stable API that exploit canot be fixed without breaking compatibility with 20% of the applications that use the API......

                                And sure I do now of a few stable APIs but the Solaris kernel definately is not counted as one of them. The thing that makes Solaris worthless for most people is its total utter lack of hardware support for some of the most common hardware on the planet. And even the few drivers it does have are mostly half-assed and broken on everything but the few revisions of the hardware that the developers had........

                                EDIT: See thats why I like the GPL. I can actually look a the code and modify it to work with my hardware. Granted I'm not a programmer, but many other people are. The point is that through the GPL I can help improve the driver for my needs. I think in the end provided that enough interest exists it is possible t5o take a craptastic driver and turn it into an awesome example of the power of open source. We are seeing that right now with the open source ATi drivers.I think it could have been done quicker if ATi had committed itself more fully than it has, but it is there own loss not mine.
                                Last edited by duby229; 07-01-2009, 05:41 PM.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X