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NVIDIA Updates Its Linux Legacy Driver For GeForce 6/7 GPUs

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  • NVIDIA Updates Its Linux Legacy Driver For GeForce 6/7 GPUs

    Phoronix: NVIDIA Updates Its Linux Legacy Driver For GeForce 6/7 GPUs

    For those still out there running a GeForce 6 or 7 series graphics card, NVIDIA has updated its legacy proprietary 304.xx Unix graphics driver for Linux, FreeBSD, and Solaris systems...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTczOTU

  • #2
    Really awesome legacy support, I'm impressed again and again. A shame that AMD isn't able to do it like that.

    At the end of the day, that makes the decision between Nvidia and AMD quite easy. The decision Intel <--> AMD processor is a bit harder, especially if AMD can improve single thread performance and lower the wattage.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by JörnS View Post
      Really awesome legacy support, I'm impressed again and again. A shame that AMD isn't able to do it like that.

      At the end of the day, that makes the decision between Nvidia and AMD quite easy.
      AMD supports the open-source graphics stack and develops it's own free graphics drivers. A shame that NVidia isn't able to do it like that. At the end of the day, that makes the decision between Nvidia and AMD quite easy.

      Comment


      • #4
        lol

        Originally posted by Julien Bear View Post
        AMD supports the open-source graphics stack and develops it's own free graphics drivers. A shame that NVidia isn't able to do it like that. At the end of the day, that makes the decision between Nvidia and AMD quite easy.
        ofc is easy, with a nvidia card everything works with amd rarely

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        • #5
          Originally posted by rikkinho View Post
          ofc is easy, with a nvidia card everything works with amd rarely
          I really want to know how people keep getting such crappy luck with AMD cards. Catalyst is not that hard to set up - I got very few problems with it. The open source drivers are, in my experience, more dependable than intel's. I get more visual artifacts and performance issues out of intel.

          If you stick with GPUs starting from HD4000 and older, or if you get the latest release, AMD is a bad choice. Get something a year or two old and they're great.

          I would have to say nvidia has the best support. Personally, I don't really care that they don't support open source. It'd be nice if they did and would make linux much better as a whole, but considering the performance they offer by doing things their own way, they're under no obligation to change their strategy.

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          • #6
            i use amd

            Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
            I really want to know how people keep getting such crappy luck with AMD cards. Catalyst is not that hard to set up - I got very few problems with it. The open source drivers are, in my experience, more dependable than intel's. I get more visual artifacts and performance issues out of intel.

            If you stick with GPUs starting from HD4000 and older, or if you get the latest release, AMD is a bad choice. Get something a year or two old and they're great.

            I would have to say nvidia has the best support. Personally, I don't really care that they don't support open source. It'd be nice if they did and would make linux much better as a whole, but considering the performance they offer by doing things their own way, they're under no obligation to change their strategy.
            i use amd/ati cards untill two years ago, bugs and more bugs, in both systems (windows and linux) and give up from their gpu, life is so much better wih nvidia

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            • #7
              Originally posted by rikkinho View Post
              i use amd/ati cards untill two years ago, bugs and more bugs, in both systems (windows and linux) and give up from their gpu, life is so much better wih nvidia
              What cards? What distro? Which drivers? Were the drivers from your distro's repo? What kind of bugs? If Windows is getting issues it's probably faulty hardware.

              Comment


              • #8
                man

                Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
                What cards? What distro? Which drivers? Were the drivers from your distro's repo? What kind of bugs? If Windows is getting issues it's probably faulty hardware.
                man don't defend amd, their drivers are garbage. but i response

                amd 4850
                amd 6770m
                amd 6970
                amd 5770
                amd 4890

                windows 7
                ubuntu
                archlinux
                manjaro
                linux mint
                windows 8

                bad render, crashs, horrible fps, no support at all (6770m), x crashs, x lockups... things never happen with nvidia 460, 740m, 620m 750 ti,

                some years ago i always buy ati cards, now.... i have no problems with amd cpu

                ah i remember another one apu a4 3300m always crashing in windows 7 with flash games, with ubuntu only opensource drivers work well, 2d performance is a garbage with fglrx... want more? buy a nvidia card and see the difference

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
                  What cards? What distro? Which drivers? Were the drivers from your distro's repo? What kind of bugs? If Windows is getting issues it's probably faulty hardware.
                  I can confirm AMD is shit. I bought HP dv6-something laptop with A6 (6550m+6750). In linux opensource worked better than catalyst: 2D is ~much~ faster and more responsive, in something like SS3 loading times on opensource are ~5 times faster. MESA clearly wins here, even DRI_PRIME works, and you don't need to apply 20 hacks and workarounds to make it work, unlike catalyst, where PXP is supported only on paper.

                  But then W8 came out and to my surprise I found out that there is simply no drivers for my setup, they dropped it (end of the line supported was Enduro stuff).
                  So I finally made decision. I made a clean W8 install, installed on it community hacked frankenstein drivers than supported my dual GPU setup and sold that laptop.

                  But at least it worked well as room heater -- two AMD devices inside emit crazy heat.
                  I still have Intel+AMD HP dv6 at work, and it idles at 55C on both mesa and catalyst (I use Intel only anyway so it heats up even with AMD card "turned off").
                  So no, thank you.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    The 4850, 6970, and 4890 are all known to have issues; maybe not for good reasons, but valid ones. The 6770m and 5770 should work just fine - I have a 5750 and I get very little problems and haven't for the past 3 years. I've used catalyst for about half the time and I'm currently using open source drivers with very little issues. The only thing that bothers me right now is no crossfire support with the open source drivers (I own 2 5750s). At this point your APU should work just fine.

                    If you didn't use the drivers supplied by your distro, you're bound to get more issues too.

                    I'm not an advocate for AMD GPUs - in the windows world, I think they're right on par with nvidia. It just depends on your workload. But for Linux I've always felt nvidia was the best choice since I first started using it in 2007. However, it will only be a matter of time until I no longer think nvidia is the best choice. The radeon drivers are catching up, fast.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by magika View Post
                      ... two AMD devices inside emit crazy heat.
                      My AMD devices are asking for my PIN number at the ATM machine

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by JörnS View Post
                        Really awesome legacy support, I'm impressed again and again. A shame that AMD isn't able to do it like that.

                        At the end of the day, that makes the decision between Nvidia and AMD quite easy. The decision Intel <--> AMD processor is a bit harder, especially if AMD can improve single thread performance and lower the wattage.
                        First part: I guess contributing to the open source driver is much more than what nvidia does. Nvidia can stop anytime. The open source driver will live on no matter what happens to AMD. This is the real legacy support in my opinion, they place control into the hands of the users.

                        Second part: If you aren't interested in games, you're OK with any GPU, even some older Intel IGP. If you plan to do some gaming, it's wise to choose AMD, despite the current disastrous state of the drivers. Consoles have AMD GPUs, so that's what future games will be optimized for. (People who think this doesn't matter, remember TWIMTBP...)

                        Third part: AMD CPUs can come nowhere near Intel processors unfortunately. The decision is only based on budget in my opinion. That's not so hard, people usually either have money or don't.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by eydee View Post
                          Second part: If you aren't interested in games, you're OK with any GPU, even some older Intel IGP. If you plan to do some gaming, it's wise to choose AMD, despite the current disastrous state of the drivers. Consoles have AMD GPUs, so that's what future games will be optimized for.
                          Console game use some obscure closed APIs with drivers handtuned for specific GPU and those APIs, so your point is weak.
                          If you are ok with ~light~ setup Intel is still best choice here.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by magika View Post
                            Console game use some obscure closed APIs with drivers handtuned for specific GPU and those APIs, so your point is weak.
                            If you are ok with ~light~ setup Intel is still best choice here.
                            If you think my point is weak, type "mantle" into the search box of phoronix and see how many articles there are about it. (It is the API used by consoles.) Thing is, time may come when new games don't even run on nvidia (and older AMD) hardware. Developers will only use directx/opengl if they can make profit out of it. And they always say releasing for the PC doesn't make any...

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by eydee View Post
                              If you think my point is weak, type "mantle" into the search box of phoronix and see how many articles there are about it. (It is the API used by consoles.) Thing is, time may come when new games don't even run on nvidia (and older AMD) hardware. Developers will only use directx/opengl if they can make profit out of it. And they always say releasing for the PC doesn't make any...
                              no it isn't present in consoles. xboxone uses directx and ps4 psgl. both sony and ms decided they are not interested in it
                              http://www.gamespot.com/forums/syste...-amd-30855822/

                              yes, your point is weaker than weak. mantle runs only on amd which doesn't cover most of pc market and even there it is only supported on few gpus.

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