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NVIDIA 304.37 Linux Driver Brings 41 Official Changes

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  • #11
    Still broken for me.

    After quitting Stellarium it freezes and crashes xorg server with familiar EQ overflowing

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    • #12
      Why is it that X.org crashes?

      Windows never crashes since Microsoft switched driver architecture to Windows Display Driver Model (WDDM).

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      • #13
        "never crashes" is probably a bit of a stretch.

        The real question is why is that when the X server goes down and restarts itself, all clients (including the desktop session) are lost? My understanding is that X.org supports server restarts without dropping clients. This would have been a really nice feature for a DE. (Not to mention saving a session while logging out.)

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        • #14
          Originally posted by Licaon View Post
          what issue?
          Using VDPAU makes everything, including the mouse cursor itself, run with something like 5FPS. In other words, the whole desktop becomes unusable while VDPAU is active.

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          • #15
            Originally posted by johnc View Post
            "never crashes" is probably a bit of a stretch.

            The real question is why is that when the X server goes down and restarts itself, all clients (including the desktop session) are lost? My understanding is that X.org supports server restarts without dropping clients.
            You seriously expect that to work in the case of a crash? A crash is a crash. The kernel kills it right there. It can't save anything and prepare for a restore.

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            • #16
              Originally posted by uid313 View Post
              Why is it that X.org crashes?

              Windows never crashes since Microsoft switched driver architecture to Windows Display Driver Model (WDDM).
              Thats a bit of a stretch. The OS attempts to reset the driver when it detects a problem. If the reset fails our timeouts, a BSOD is thrown [either 0x116 or 0x117, depending on which case occurs: Error or Timeout]. If the reset succeeds, you get the "Display Driver has stopped responding and has recovered" message, which indicates a problem, but one the OS could recover from.

              Still, the display backend as of Vista is a heck of a lot more stable then it was in XP. Only time I had a Windows display driver crash on Vista/7 was when my GPU (4890 at the time) ended up getting some bad VRAM, which is a hardware, not software, problem.

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              • #17
                Originally posted by gamerk2 View Post
                Thats a bit of a stretch. The OS attempts to reset the driver when it detects a problem. If the reset fails our timeouts, a BSOD is thrown [either 0x116 or 0x117, depending on which case occurs: Error or Timeout]. If the reset succeeds, you get the "Display Driver has stopped responding and has recovered" message, which indicates a problem, but one the OS could recover from.

                Still, the display backend as of Vista is a heck of a lot more stable then it was in XP. Only time I had a Windows display driver crash on Vista/7 was when my GPU (4890 at the time) ended up getting some bad VRAM, which is a hardware, not software, problem.
                I have similar experiences with Windows 7. It never crashed. Linux on the other hand was very prone to crashing. At least until I got rid of my Radeon card and switched to NVidia. With the AMD drivers (both the open ones and fglrx), the machine would sometimes freeze and stop responding. Only reset buttons would work. This happened maybe one or two times in a month.

                Windows 7 is rock solid and stable with either card. I cannot crash it, no matter what I do.

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by RealNC View Post
                  You seriously expect that to work in the case of a crash? A crash is a crash. The kernel kills it right there. It can't save anything and prepare for a restore.
                  I'm not sure how the client / server architecture is designed, but it would seem feasible. I assume they communicate through system ports.

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                  • #19
                    Yeah, Windows 7 is very solid and stable.

                    Why does Linux/Xorg crash?

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by RealNC View Post
                      Windows 7 is rock solid and stable with either card. I cannot crash it, no matter what I do.
                      Get a SandForce or Crucial SSD.

                      But yes, this "Windows crashes all the time" is mostly just Windows for Workgroups hysteria brought forward 15 years. Since Windows 2000 it has been as stable as any system I've used in a desktop setting.

                      Far more than Ubuntu.

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