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NVIDIA's 302 Linux Driver Finally Has RandR 1.2/1.3

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  • NVIDIA's 302 Linux Driver Finally Has RandR 1.2/1.3

    Phoronix: NVIDIA's 302 Linux Driver Finally Has RandR 1.2/1.3

    At long last, the NVIDIA binary Linux graphics driver properly implements support for versions 1.2 and 1.3 of RandR, the Resize and Rotate extension for the X.Org Server. This support comes with the newly-introduced 302.xx beta Linux graphics driver...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTA5NTY

  • #2
    Originally posted by asdx
    But still, no KMS, no plans to support Wayland...
    ... And still no Optimus support ! Will I ever be able to use the Nvidia chip embedded in my laptop before I switch for an Intel only one ?

    Comment


    • #3
      Hey, what's with the pessimism? Seriously, that's great news!

      Will xrandr 1.1 rotation be supported by default now, or still need an
      Code:
      Option      "RandRRotation" "true"
      option in xorg.conf?

      Comment


      • #4
        Does this finally allow me to select on which monitor the panel of the gnome-shell should be rendered?

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by aelo View Post
          Does this finally allow me to select on which monitor the panel of the gnome-shell should be rendered?
          Yes that should work now.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by asdx
            But still, no KMS, no plans to support Wayland...
            Do you realize pretty much all your posts are you demanding you get all sorts of stuff "right nao!"? Without doing anything on your part to make them happen?

            Nvidia will surely support Wayland once it's actually usable. By that I mean once you'll be able to run a full system on it. But getting there takes time. If this process isn't going fast enough for you, then do something about it, instead of just demanding things like a spoiled kid.

            And about KMS, this has already been explained before: KMS is an implementation detail, it's one possible way of doing modesetting. Nvidia has no reason to support it, they already have their own implementation of kernel modesetting. The people demanding KMS from Nvidia don't actually want KMS, what they want is a high-res console. Which Nvidia probably could provide, if they had incentive (read: if one of their high-paying customers wanted it).
            I have to ask though: Why is a high-res console so important? I bet most of the people demanding KMS from Nvidia are using X all the time.


            Anyway, rather than whining about what isn't there, my reaction to this news was OMG!! I think this is quite something. While I didn't mind setting up Twinview, being able to use standard xrandr tools is quite welcome.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Cyborg16 View Post
              Hey, what's with the pessimism? Seriously, that's great news!

              Will xrandr 1.1 rotation be supported by default now, or still need an
              Code:
              Option      "RandRRotation" "true"
              option in xorg.conf?
              It's in the article...
              *Removed the "Rotate" X configuration option. This was used to statically rotate the X screen. Its functionality is replaced by the "Rotation" MetaMode attribute and RandR 1.2 rotation support. See the README for details.
              *Removed the "RandRRotation" X configuration option. This enabled configurability of X screen rotation via RandR 1.1. Its functionality is replaced by the "Rotation
              More importantly that probably means you can finally get one screen rotated normal and one screen rotated left/right in an easy way.

              Comment


              • #8
                Clap Clap Clap

                Thanks, finally, waited for ever, it works pretty neat!
                Clap Clap Clap...

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Gusar View Post
                  The people demanding KMS from Nvidia don't actually want KMS, what they want is a high-res console. Which Nvidia probably could provide, if they had incentive (read: if one of their high-paying customers wanted it).
                  I have to ask though: Why is a high-res console so important? I bet most of the people demanding KMS from Nvidia are using X all the time.
                  Actually, high-res console is not really an issue, as you can simply use vesa modes (vga=0xXXX) which is close enough (minus flicker and very-slow-switch).
                  However, at least in theory (read: in the future), KMS should give you an option to see OOps message while in X.
                  Granted, Linux BSOD screen is *not* a killer feature, but if you spend your days tearing at serial consoles, a KMS console is a refreshing change...

                  Originally posted by Gusar View Post
                  ... my reaction to this news was OMG!! I think this is quite something. While I didn't mind setting up Twinview, being able to use standard xrandr tools is quite welcome.
                  Indeed!

                  - Gilboa
                  DEV: Intel S2600C0, 2xE52658V2, 32GB, 4x2TB + 2x3TB, GTX780, F21/x86_64, Dell U2711.
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                  BACK: Tyan Tempest i5400XT, 2xE5335, 8GB, 3x1.5TB, 9800GTX, F21/x86-64.
                  LAP: ASUS N56VJ, i7-3630QM, 16GB, 1TB, 635M, F21/x86_64.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by gilboa View Post
                    Actually, high-res console is not really an issue, as you can simply use vesa modes (vga=0xXXX) which is close enough (minus flicker and very-slow-switch).
                    Minus native resolution if it's not in the vbios of the card, which in many cases it isn't (particularly widescreen resolutions tend to be absent).

                    Originally posted by gilboa View Post
                    However, at least in theory (read: in the future), KMS should give you an option to see OOps message while in X.
                    Not in theory, the future is now . Has been here for some time now. Check your dmesg, you'll see "drm: registered panic notifier" in there - if you're using a KMS driver that is . Nvidia could easily implement their own such notifier, I doubt drm and KMS are strictly needed for that.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by asdx
                      Is that nothing? Maybe.
                      It's not nothing. But it won't make the things you want done faster. That requires writing code. And repeating "does it have KMS, Wayland?", won't get that code written faster.

                      Originally posted by asdx
                      I don't demand things to be done "right now", I only express my ideas and what I think is important to do.
                      Your posting history shows a different picture. An example, there's more: click. Basically, your tone is... off, to say it mildly.

                      Originally posted by asdx
                      Quite frankly, I wouldn't be able to contribute to the blob even if I wanted to, since it's all closed-source software.
                      True, but you could contribute to Wayland and Mesa and such. And by contribute I mean more than just bug reports. I can do that with the nvidia driver too, I did in fact, and Nvidia confirmed the report and fixed the issue in one of the next driver versions.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Can anyone confirm a fix for the older card slow downs that was introduced in 295.40?

                        Originally posted by Gusar View Post
                        And about KMS, this has already been explained before: KMS is an implementation detail, it's one possible way of doing modesetting. Nvidia has no reason to support it, they already have their own implementation of kernel modesetting. The people demanding KMS from Nvidia don't actually want KMS, what they want is a high-res console. Which Nvidia probably could provide, if they had incentive (read: if one of their high-paying customers wanted it).
                        I have to ask though: Why is a high-res console so important? I bet most of the people demanding KMS from Nvidia are using X all the time.
                        A flicker free boot would be nice, though I'm still generally very impressed with nvidia's effort.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          There's no such thing as an nvidia story without somebody complaining about so-called lack of KMS support.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Gusar View Post
                            And about KMS, this has already been explained before: KMS is an implementation detail, it's one possible way of doing modesetting. Nvidia has no reason to support it, they already have their own implementation of kernel modesetting. The people demanding KMS from Nvidia don't actually want KMS, what they want is a high-res console.
                            Actually, no. You're right, it's an implementation detail, but it's a significant one. For the open drivers, KMS provides a single consistent method of mode setting, meaning that we have a solution that works for the console, for X, for Wayland, and anything else that might come up. It means that even lacking a decent hardware-accelerated driver, there's always the option to fall back to framebuffer.

                            By not supporting KMS, Nvidia can't do that. You can't write a system that, e.g switches to a high-res mode for a bootsplash screen, then seamlessly hands over to X. Nor can you switch between X and a console without a mode switch. It can't even co-exist with the KMS support that the Nouveau guys have added. And that's because all that Nvidia provide is an X driver - a very good one, to be sure, but one which provides no integration with the standard way of doing things on Linux.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Mystro256 View Post
                              Can anyone confirm a fix for the older card slow downs that was introduced in 295.40?
                              ...
                              Not sure but those should be fixed according to nvidia driver team:
                              http://www.nvnews.net/vbulletin/show...4&postcount=31

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