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NVIDIA Linux Driver Now Does GL_EXT_x11_sync_object

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  • NVIDIA Linux Driver Now Does GL_EXT_x11_sync_object

    Phoronix: NVIDIA Linux Driver Now Does GL_EXT_x11_sync_object

    NVIDIA's Linux/Unix engineering team has issued a new Linux beta driver in the 275.xx series. To succeed the first 275.xx Linux beta that was put out a few weeks back, NVIDIA has released the 275.09.04 Beta. There's only a few changes in this beta released today, but among them is support for the GL_EXT_x11_sync_object extension...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=OTU0NQ

  • #2
    Oh ya forgot to mention the pre-release beta 270.41.19 was also promoted to their official release.

    Comment


    • #3
      Looks like the konsole resize bug's fixed as I have not had any lockup when resizing konsole windows. Does this work for everyone?

      Comment


      • #4
        Does this mean that the infamous Nvidia+Linux tearing issue is resolved?

        Probably not. Silly me. It's only the year 2011.
        Why should I, indeed, be able to watch movies of any resolution on my pitiful 1Gb GT520 or GT216 cards without having horrendous and distracting screen distortion such as tearing?
        Obviously this is a totally unreasonable aspiration.

        Excuse my sarcasm. I'm just bitterly disappointed that when I bought my hi-spec Lenovo W510 with a top-of-the range GPU and used the best drivers available for Linux (Nvidia proprietary), that the actual real-life performance for the most typical real-life application (watching a fricking movie) is absolutely shockingly bad.
        Any horizontal tracking of the image (panning left to right - which is fairly common in a movie let's face it) results in the image being torn up into multiple big ugly lines. Awful.

        It wasn't even this bad 10 years ago when I bought a 32mb AGP card and watched roughly similar resolution movies on far inferior hardware.

        All the "solutions" out there - sync to vblank, increase refresh etc - are complete red herrings and have no effect.

        Sigh.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by dan77g View Post
          Does this mean that the infamous Nvidia+Linux tearing issue is resolved?

          Probably not. Silly me. It's only the year 2011.
          Why should I, indeed, be able to watch movies of any resolution on my pitiful 1Gb GT520 or GT216 cards without having horrendous and distracting screen distortion such as tearing?
          Obviously this is a totally unreasonable aspiration.

          Excuse my sarcasm. I'm just bitterly disappointed that when I bought my hi-spec Lenovo W510 with a top-of-the range GPU and used the best drivers available for Linux (Nvidia proprietary), that the actual real-life performance for the most typical real-life application (watching a fricking movie) is absolutely shockingly bad.
          Any horizontal tracking of the image (panning left to right - which is fairly common in a movie let's face it) results in the image being torn up into multiple big ugly lines. Awful.

          It wasn't even this bad 10 years ago when I bought a 32mb AGP card and watched roughly similar resolution movies on far inferior hardware.

          All the "solutions" out there - sync to vblank, increase refresh etc - are complete red herrings and have no effect.

          Sigh.
          Not one of my nvidia machines have a tearing issue.

          Comment


          • #6
            Not sure what your point is there, deanjo. I certainly didn't find it very supportive or helpful.

            Is the implication that I'm doing something wrong? Or I'm imagining it? (That's my inference.)
            Or that you're just lucky?
            Or maybe you just don't notice it? Perhaps you don't watch many movies. Or perhaps you don't pay much attention to them. After all, it can be a very subtle distortion sometimes. And it doesn't affect the same piece of video content in the same way every time.

            But it DOES happen.

            And I think it's a legitimate issue to raise here in Phoronix (perhaps the best technical resource for Linux and GPU related performance concerns) on the announcement of a new release from NVidia.

            Go to any of these sites and search for "tearing" and you will get an idea of the numbers affected:
            http://forums.nvidia.com
            http://www.nvnews.net
            http://ubuntuforums.org

            And here is just ONE example of a post that has rumbled on for ages:
            nvnews.net - Tearing, Tearing and again TEARING!!

            And I know it's only a rough metric, but nonetheless:
            Google hits from the PAST MONTH for "linux nvidia tearing" ---> 66,600
            Google hits from the PAST MONTH for "windows nvidia tearing" ---> 52,900

            Considering that there are many orders of magnitude MORE windows users out there, I think this statistic is significant.

            (Of course, more than just NVidia chipsets are at play here. The root cause may lie in Xorg, the kernel, or an interaction between multiple components. Whatever it is - the problem is out there.)

            Comment


            • #7
              Not sure what your point is there, deanjo. I certainly didn't find it very supportive or helpful.

              Is the implication that I'm doing something wrong? Or I'm imagining it? (That's my inference.)
              Or that you're just lucky?
              Or maybe you just don't notice it? Perhaps you don't watch many movies. Or perhaps you don't pay much attention to them. After all, it can be a very subtle distortion sometimes. And it doesn't affect the same piece of video content in the same way every time.

              But it DOES happen.

              And I think it's a legitimate issue to raise here in Phoronix (perhaps the best technical resource for Linux and GPU related performance concerns) on the announcement of a new release from NVidia.

              Go to any of these sites and search for "tearing" and you will get an idea of the numbers affected:
              http://forums.nvidia.com
              http://www.nvnews.net
              http://ubuntuforums.org

              And here is just ONE example of a post that has rumbled on for ages:
              nvnews.net - Tearing, Tearing and again TEARING!!

              And I know it's only a rough metric, but nonetheless:
              Google hits from the PAST MONTH for "linux nvidia tearing" ---> 66,600
              Google hits from the PAST MONTH for "windows nvidia tearing" ---> 52,900

              Considering that there are many orders of magnitude MORE windows users out there, I think this statistic is significant.

              (Of course, more than just NVidia chipsets are at play here. The root cause may lie in Xorg, the kernel, or an interaction between multiple components. Whatever it is - the problem is out there.)

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by dan77g View Post
                All the "solutions" out there - sync to vblank, increase refresh etc - are complete red herrings and have no effect.
                Sigh.
                TwinView? VDPAU? X Composite extension? VDPAU_NVIDIA_SYNC_DISPLAY_DEVICE set?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thanks, Rocco, for those quick-fire suggestions.

                  As it happens, the tearing occurs on a single-screen setup, say on my Lenovo W510. I don't even have Composite enabled at the moment, because I find that it locks up my machine due to a completely different and annoying bug.
                  As for the VDPAU environment variable - AFAICT that only is relevant for multiple screen configurations. And I don't know any other way in which VDPAU could be affecting this, or how I could adjust it ....

                  Any feedback welcome though. Thanks again!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by dan77g View Post
                    Excuse my sarcasm. I'm just bitterly disappointed that when I bought my hi-spec Lenovo W510 with a top-of-the range GPU and used the best drivers available for Linux (Nvidia proprietary), that the actual real-life performance for the most typical real-life application (watching a fricking movie) is absolutely shockingly bad.
                    I agree with the others, there must be something weird going on with your particular system. On my W510 I never had tearing with any (prop.) driver or kernel since I got it >1yr ago (mostly stock debian sid, aptosid or debian kernels, xfce+compiz, mplayer, hdaps off).

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Well I would certainly hope you're right - it's frustrating to have to deal with such irritations on this kind of hardware.
                      I assume that your findings are based on similar scenarios ie watching 700mb size Xvid encodings, typical

                      I really don't know what could be peculiar about my setups, after all. They are just stock, vanilla up-to-date Ubuntu installations. And this issue has not been restricted to to any one distribution ....

                      Nonetheless, there's no harm in trying a Debian install. I'll try some problem files with an installation as not.sure outlines (thanks!)... maybe the wireless 802.11n will even work reliably as well ... and the X composite extension won't freeze the machine ...

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Well I would certainly hope you're right - it's frustrating to have to deal with such irritations on this kind of hardware.
                        I assume that your findings are based on similar scenarios, ie watching 700mb size Xvid encodings, typical medium-res Flash videos on Youtube ... I have a feeling that the tearing occurs less with DVD-quality vob rips, but it's certainly not eliminated.

                        I really don't know what could be peculiar about my setups, after all. They are just stock, vanilla up-to-date Ubuntu installations. And this issue has not been restricted to to any one distribution ....

                        Nonetheless, there's no harm in trying a Debian install. I'll try some problem files with an installation as not.sure outlines (thanks!)... maybe the wireless 802.11n will even work reliably as well ... and the X composite extension won't freeze the machine ...

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by dan77g View Post
                          And I know it's only a rough metric, but nonetheless:
                          Google hits from the PAST MONTH for "linux nvidia tearing" ---> 66,600
                          Google hits from the PAST MONTH for "windows nvidia tearing" ---> 52,900
                          As the person responsible for 66,000 of those Google searches, I can tell you that I definitely feel your pain with the tearing issue. It is annoying as hell. I really lucked out and was able to pinpoint it down to compiz being the turd in the toilet for my case. Otherwise I was going to go crazy with those side-pans.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Various issues with tearing definitely exist, especially when an OpenGL compositing manager is in use and/or when multiple displays are attached. As far as I understood, these sync fences reliably allow avoiding tearing, but they have to be used by the compositing manager. It doesn't happen automagically.

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