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NVIDIA Developer Talks Openly About Linux Support

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  • Originally posted by movieman View Post
    [...] if Intel don't already have a generic cross-licensing deal with Nvidia.
    I highly doubt that. In fact I will entirely write this off because nVidia can't get their hands on the required x86 patents to make a competetive CPU
    Last edited by V!NCENT; 10-26-2009, 01:46 PM.

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    • Originally posted by V!NCENT View Post
      In fact I will entirely write this off because nVidia can't get their hands on the required x86 patents to make a competetive CPU
      I was meaning graphics-related patents: the odds that Nvidia have some graphics patents that affect Intel GPUs -- and vice-versa -- are quite high.

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      • Originally posted by movieman View Post
        I was meaning graphics-related patents: the odds that Nvidia have some graphics patents that affect Intel GPUs -- and vice-versa -- are quite high.
        Good point, but if that were true then can't nVidia simply demand a cross CPU patent license too or tell Intel to go pack their GPU business backs when the contract period expires? nVidia has to share their patents with Intel but Intel doesn't give back? That's generaly not how genuine business works...

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        • Originally posted by V!NCENT View Post
          nVidia has to share their patents with Intel but Intel doesn't give back? That's generaly not how genuine business works...
          Typically the deal is either: 'we'll trade you perpetual use of these patents of ours that you need to run your business for perpetual use of those patents of yours that we need to run our business' or 'we'll trade you a big wad of cash for perpetual use of those patents of yours that we need to run our business'. Nvidia did have some kind Intel FSB license; I've no idea what they traded to get that but I doubt the agreement extended to allow them access to future non-FSB hardware (didn't they buy it from a third party, or am I confusing them with someone else?).
          Last edited by movieman; 10-26-2009, 03:03 PM.

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          • Originally posted by movieman View Post
            Typically the deal is either: 'we'll trade you perpetual use of these patents of ours that you need to run your business for perpetual use of those patents of yours that we need to run our business' or 'we'll trade you a big wad of cash for perpetual use of those patents of yours that we need to run our business'.
            Intel has both businesses, and a shitload of cash and practically has got nVidia by the balls?

            [Nvidia did have some kind Intel FSB license; I've no idea what they traded to get that but I doubt the agreement extended to allow them access to future non-FSB hardware (didn't they buy it from a third party, or am I confusing them with someone else?).
            I wouldn't know. Via maybe? Or wait... nVidia was in the mobo business, I think I remember it had something to do with a chipset... But I seem to not really remember nVidia on this one...

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            • Nvidia bough ULI some time ago but not VIA.

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              • How far back in the GPU models are they going to deal with in their latest versions. For example, I am using an ASUS 9600GT TOP GPU right now. Is this version of the GPU likely to be handled by their new releases? At what point would it be worth upgrading my GPU in order to take advantage of the latest releases? I am not in a position to drop large sums of cash on the GPU's but I would like to take advantage of most of the benefits of the latest releases. Is there someplace where the average user would be able to find what is really covered by the latest releases when it comes to the GPU expressed in language that is understandable by someone who is not totally up with the lingo?

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                • Originally posted by rhomp2002 View Post
                  How far back in the GPU models are they going to deal with in their latest versions. For example, I am using an ASUS 9600GT TOP GPU right now. Is this version of the GPU likely to be handled by their new releases? At what point would it be worth upgrading my GPU in order to take advantage of the latest releases? I am not in a position to drop large sums of cash on the GPU's but I would like to take advantage of most of the benefits of the latest releases. Is there someplace where the average user would be able to find what is really covered by the latest releases when it comes to the GPU expressed in language that is understandable by someone who is not totally up with the lingo?
                  Lol, don't worry

                  Your nVidia design fault ridden GPU will die off waaaaaaaaaaaaay before your card is unsupported by the latest drivers

                  The GeForce 4000 series (you know, the, what?, 10 year old cards) had been dropped in, what was it? 2009? So once your desktop turns into the heaviest thing that your GPU can handle, it would be time to buy a new one anyway (if the rest of your PC hasn't died already )

                  $0,02

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                  • What do you consider "dropped"?

                    My GeForce 5 series card was dropped quite a while ago. Which means no new bugfixes or features. KDE4 ran like molasses on the thing.

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                    • Originally posted by pingufunkybeat View Post
                      What do you consider "dropped"?

                      My GeForce 5 series card was dropped quite a while ago. Which means no new bugfixes or features. KDE4 ran like molasses on the thing.
                      Wrong, bugfixes are still done on the Geforce 5. Legacy on nvidia cards does not mean no fixes. No new feature, yes, unless you consider updating to run with the latest kernels and xorgs a feature.

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