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NVIDIA GeForce GT 220

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  • #31
    Originally posted by Nille View Post
    You are an cute Fanboy. On my System i have no problems with DXVA and ATI with h.264 and VC-1. Or its posibile that i make something wrong because its work?
    Friends of mine with an ati card have no problems at all with these formats. But reading this thread gt220 might be referencing to a few ati users with problems on this subject... good thing users of nvidia don't have these kind of problems

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    • #32
      the nvidia fanboy has a point though. There are alot of ATI fanboys here. Some people are here for the open driver religiously, and thats good for 2D apps. But others worship ATI like some sort of god.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by GT220 View Post
        Anandtech reviews a card with half the memory
        You make an excellent point. The GT220 is not only uncompetitively slower than an equally-priced Radeon, it is crippled with half the memory.

        A no-brainer no-sale indeed.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by L33F3R View Post
          the nvidia fanboy has a point though. There are alot of ATI fanboys here. Some people are here for the open driver religiously, and thats good for 2D apps. But others worship ATI like some sort of god.
          Actually, I'd say things are pretty tame around these parts. Unexpectedly so, I'd add - just check some other hardware forums to see what really fanboys look like!

          The worst that ever happens here is trolling on each other's driver threads. It usually goes like this:

          - NV worshipper: hey, what's up doc, check out this awesome H264 video! 5% CPU usage video here - what's yours? What you don't have VDPAU yet? Losers! Your blob sucks!
          - AMD worshipper: yes, but watch our open drivers whoop the ass out of your binary blob. Awesome 2D performance, KMS *and* support for new kernels before they are even written!
          - NV worshipper: ha! Our wine tastes better.
          - AMD worshipper: not for long. Besides, our driver rises faster and lasts longer than yours.
          - Intel worshipper: (timidly) err, may I say something?
          - Both: SHUT UP!

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          • #35
            I think it is a good card to test the new divx accelleration but of course no card for pure gamers - I would like to have got one. Basically a G210 would be enough for that too if you only need vdpau support.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by Ant P. View Post
              *snip* The GT220 is not only uncompetitively slower than an equally-priced Radeon, it is crippled with half the memory.
              *snip*
              To be clear about this... I was refering to the windows drivers comparison. On linux no doubt... nvidia is imho the better choice if you're only interested in the performance and features

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              • #37
                Originally posted by L33F3R View Post
                the nvidia fanboy has a point though. There are alot of ATI fanboys here. Some people are here for the open driver religiously, and thats good for 2D apps. But others worship ATI like some sort of god.
                How is that good only for 2D apps?
                The latest open source AMD driver supports all cards up to R7xx in ***3D*** and due to architectural similarities from R6xx through R8xx, this is very soon to expand to the very latest.

                I don't know about you, but it is kinda nice when you don't need to worry about whether or not nvidia keeps up with the latest kernel and xorg versions... or whether or not nvidia decides to drop support for your card into "legacy" (aka dead).

                And how about this;
                When you are playing a video, WHO CARES how much CPU it uses? As long as it doesn't PEG your CPU, then the video will continue to playback smoothly. Any recent multi-core CPU can handle HD playback fully within software, but that is not where AMD is stopping... You see right now is a VERY exciting time for AMD drivers -- the R6xx7xx 3D support has just hit, the R300g (gallium 3D) driver (for R300-R500 hardware) is coming along while the R6xx MESA driver is being optimized and debugged. Soon work will begin on the R600g driver, and G3D will be used for (at least partial) video acceleration, which will bring HD video decoding down to being a light load on an older single-core CPU. And does it really matter if your CPU sits at 10% vs nvidia at 5%? It doesn't make *any* difference in playback.

                Tell me this; how will NVidia compete with that? When AMD hardware *just works* for *everything*, nvidia will still be stuck up in their binary blob world and their customers will still be faced with the "what if nvidia doesn't keep supporting my card [fast enough]?" problem.

                Don't get me wrong... I used to use nvidia hardware and would avoid ATI at all costs. But things have changed and continue to change. The last two nvidia devices I bought were a 7800GTX (when it was top end new stuff) and a 6100 (laptop). They worked, better than anything else available at the time, and they still work and are in use, BUT, the drivers have been a nightmare (as an example, there was a stretch of about 6 months when the nvidia drivers would entirely crap out when switching VT's or going into DPMS on the 6100), and since AMD promises long term support (through open source drivers) ***AND HAS IRREVOCABLY DELIVERED***, that is where I am now putting my money.


                Point is this;
                GIVEN equivalent hardware (I'm not interested in getting into quality or performance arguments by any means), I will select the device that promises a better overall long-term experience -- and right now that happens to be AMD. So to hell with fanboys, at the moment, AMD happens to be the best choice. Who knows -- maybe next year VIA will pull a rabbit out of its a$$ and make a discrete graphics card that blows everything else away, complete with clean, efficient, and complete open source G3D drivers .

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                • #38
                  While I appreciate the benchmarking that Phoronix does, I have to question why. It may be interesting to compare Linux performance to other distros, or Windows or even OSX. However, testing video cards seems a bit of a waste as Linux in general, and Linux gaming for that matter are still stuck at DX9 level, to use a Windows reference.

                  The only real difference in the modern cards is the DX level they understand, and the overall power of the GPU. Both of these factors are irrelevant to Linux. I still have an old EVGA 7600gt, and just purchased a new Zotac 7600gs for my spare machine. Both are more than adequate for anything Linux is capable of.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by tlmck View Post
                    While I appreciate the benchmarking that Phoronix does, I have to question why. It may be interesting to compare Linux performance to other distros, or Windows or even OSX. However, testing video cards seems a bit of a waste as Linux in general, and Linux gaming for that matter are still stuck at DX9 level, to use a Windows reference.

                    The only real difference in the modern cards is the DX level they understand, and the overall power of the GPU. Both of these factors are irrelevant to Linux. I still have an old EVGA 7600gt, and just purchased a new Zotac 7600gs for my spare machine. Both are more than adequate for anything Linux is capable of.
                    "What Linux is capable of"? For a home user, maybe a 7600 is enough (if you don't care about video acceleration or games). However for a game developer that's not enough. Neither is it for anyone using Linux professionaly for graphics design, research or scientific visualizations.

                    You are using your own experience and needs to extrapolate for other users. Needless to say, the results of this process aren't always applicable.

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                    • #40
                      @droidhacker

                      I am 100% sure you never played bd content on linux just much lower bitrate rips.

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                      • #41
                        I like how everyone has Nvidia issues and not me.

                        @droidhacker

                        I am the proud owner of several video cards:

                        ATI Rage
                        ATI AIW 7500 (r100)
                        Nvidia 5200
                        Nvidia 6200
                        Nvidia 7950 (was a 7900 but when it broke BFG gimme a 7950 replacement)

                        I have also installed countless others from various brands.

                        I bought my 6200, god knows how long ago. It still works great for me, say when my 7950 broke i juz swapped the card and it worked fine. The driver still works great and so does the performance on it. My 7950 is a few years old aswell. It runs amazing still, the driver is great. No issues that i have come across. I have a 5200, on the old driver that nvidia no longer supports. And guess what?

                        It works great. And continues to work great. Distro to distro.

                        I am no Nvidia fanboy. I am just a guy who looks for performance and compatibility. my 7500 is sitting in the computer behind me and the open driver works great for it. But at the end of the day, some of us are performance oriented people who use Nvidia cards, we are not satanic evil dogs, believe it or not. When the open driver becomes good enough, I will purchase ATI hardware again. But in the meantime, i laugh while people like you whine that their driver doesnt work.

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by L33F3R View Post
                          I like how everyone has Nvidia issues and not me.

                          @droidhacker

                          I am the proud owner of several video cards:

                          ATI Rage
                          ATI AIW 7500 (r100)
                          Nvidia 5200
                          Nvidia 6200
                          Nvidia 7950 (was a 7900 but when it broke BFG gimme a 7950 replacement)

                          I have also installed countless others from various brands.

                          I bought my 6200, god knows how long ago. It still works great for me, say when my 7950 broke i juz swapped the card and it worked fine. The driver still works great and so does the performance on it. My 7950 is a few years old aswell. It runs amazing still, the driver is great. No issues that i have come across. I have a 5200, on the old driver that nvidia no longer supports. And guess what?

                          It works great. And continues to work great. Distro to distro.

                          I am no Nvidia fanboy. I am just a guy who looks for performance and compatibility. my 7500 is sitting in the computer behind me and the open driver works great for it. But at the end of the day, some of us are performance oriented people who use Nvidia cards, we are not satanic evil dogs, believe it or not. When the open driver becomes good enough, I will purchase ATI hardware again. But in the meantime, i laugh while people like you whine that their driver doesnt work.
                          You ever go through the nvnews forum (the one linked to from the nvidia linux driver web page). You would be STUNNED by the number of problems that arise out of that mess.

                          You also apparently don't have any experience triaging bugs. Typically, for every user who experiences any particular bug, there are a HUNDRED or a THOUSAND who don't. Even if the bug is a critical bug that makes the software entirely UNUSABLE for that user.

                          The example I gave you was a bug that affected 6100 and 6150 integrated GPUs. Other GPUs were unaffected. They knew about it and yet DID NOTHING for the better part of a YEAR.

                          Now under the circumstances, the hardware was selected and purchased based on guarantees made by the manufacturer pertaining to the usability of the hardware for general 2d and 3d use in Linux, which means that, quite frankly, they were OBLIGATED to fix it and owed it to me as their customer to whom they DO have legal obligation. Is this whining? No. This is fact.

                          To make this more clear, lets say, for example, that you buy a new CAR, and there is some programming defect that prevents it from running when the engine temperature exceeds 120F, even though this particular code works fine for a DIFFERENT MODEL. The thing works fine for a couple of KM before it quits. You then have to wait an hour for it to cool down before driving it again, or get it towed back. Now the manufacturer knows about this problem since everybody who bought one of those cars has experienced the problem and is complaining about it. But despite having the same software, it is only the owners of YOUR MODEL that have problems. It takes the manufacturer the better part of a year before they get off their lazy a$$es and repair the bug, which allows your car to actually work. What would you do... sit around and accept it? Or would you raise bloody hell with them? Litigation maybe? How about class action? But no, this is a video card, not a car, so it *doesn't matter*.

                          Fact is that the manufacturer's obligations don't depend on what the product actually IS, the fact that you paid money based on guarantees that THEY MAKE with respect to the product that they sell OBLIGATES them to ensure that what you purchased from them continues to operate exactly as expected throughout the guaranteed life of the product.

                          And this is just one example of problems from nvidia. There are MANY MANY other similar problems -- some affecting all hardware, some affecting just *some* hardware. And you may or may not trip any particular bug depending on the way you use the product. That doesn't mean that it is perfect. I really suggest that you go through that forum to see the kind of things that go wrong. How about this one... looks pretty juicy: http://www.nvnews.net/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=123912 --- and, that thread has been running for just shy of a WHOLE YEAR.


                          And more....
                          Yes, I can appreciate that some people (very very few) actually are impressed in getting that 350 FPS up to 355 (note: this is already WAY over the threshold of what you brain will perceive as fluid).

                          But note: according to every open source driver developer who lives, optimization of the R6xx driver and architectural improvements due to G3D are supposed to take away the performance gap between OSS and blob drivers, so even that argument is very temporary.

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Originally posted by Kano View Post
                            @droidhacker

                            I am 100% sure you never played bd content on linux just much lower bitrate rips.
                            Seeing as BD isn't supported by Linux anyways (regardless of who makes the GPU).... that really isn't a very difficult assumption to get away with.

                            More on Linux support for BD:
                            http://forum.doom9.org/showthread.php?p=1332018

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              It is not impossible got get the m2ts files when you have got win on one partition.

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                              • #45
                                Originally posted by BlackStar View Post
                                "What Linux is capable of"? For a home user, maybe a 7600 is enough (if you don't care about video acceleration or games). However for a game developer that's not enough. Neither is it for anyone using Linux professionaly for graphics design, research or scientific visualizations.

                                You are using your own experience and needs to extrapolate for other users. Needless to say, the results of this process aren't always applicable.
                                Actually I was referring to the home user and games. The native games run under openGL, and the Windows games you can run successfully under Wine stop at DX9. My gaming genre of choice is the First Person Shooter.

                                I had a 9600gt briefly, but saw no benefit from it.

                                If game developers need them, where are the Linux games that can take advantage?

                                As far as I know, the scientific type apps lend themselves better to a workstation style card.

                                One other commercial app I can think of would be the Hollywood special effects guys. However, I believe their app falls more into the render farm category.

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