Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

NVIDIA 190.16 Driver Brings OpenGL 3.2 To Linux

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #11
    Originally posted by mirv View Post
    "The only" is somewhat misdirected too - perhaps the only comsumer proprietary driver, but not the only. Just wanted to mention that....
    Really? Show me one opensource driver that can compete in the 3d and hd playback.

    Comment


    • #12
      Do I have to beg? Do i have to get on my knees? PLEASE, I have posted for help on a half dozen linux forums (now including nvnews) for help on my issue. I really would like to use linux and learn it but I need help. I bet if I knew a guru locally he could have it up an running in no time. Anyway PLEASE help..

      Comment


      • #13
        Originally posted by deanjo View Post
        Really? Show me one opensource driver that can compete in the 3d and hd playback.
        Actually, I put "the only" in quotes previously because you had only mentioned 3d support. I can't comment on hd playback - I don't have a hd monitor. But if you think nvidia are the only ones to "allow further development of 3d in linux", or even were the first to do so, you're quite mistaken. I had 3d running off a banshee, and developed opengl with r200 open source drivers - and played ut with them.

        Comment


        • #14
          Originally posted by deanjo View Post
          You mean that big evil blob that has provided the only fully functional 3d acceleration for years so people at least had some card that they could use in a functional state that would allow further development of 3d in linux and others? You mean that blob that provides the only real HD decoding ability on anything but a netbook? Ya you have a lot to hate but it seems misdirected.
          I agree completely, but it's been around so long that the Nouveau devs have basically reverse-engineered the whole thing and according to them, they don't need any documentation at this point.

          Comment


          • #15
            Originally posted by mirv View Post
            Actually, I put "the only" in quotes previously because you had only mentioned 3d support. I can't comment on hd playback - I don't have a hd monitor. But if you think nvidia are the only ones to "allow further development of 3d in linux", or even were the first to do so, you're quite mistaken. I had 3d running off a banshee, and developed opengl with r200 open source drivers - and played ut with them.
            I said "fully functional 3d acceleration". There are many aspects of FOSS drivers that have never been able to do. Latest OGL support is just one such example.

            Comment


            • #16
              They were fully functional at the time of their use (display lists & all). You can hardly expect a banshee to support the latest opengl versions however. If you're referring to the current level of support (and I'll use opengl as an example here) - I'm pretty sure everyone who can support the latest version already does. And we'll exclude opengl 3.2 from that list (considering the spec hasn't even been released yet). I find it interesting in that regard that the nvidia drivers put the version number in there - whilst true that it will likely include everything in 3.2, it's still a little pre-emptive.

              Comment


              • #17
                Originally posted by ap90033 View Post
                Do I have to beg? Do i have to get on my knees? PLEASE, I have posted for help on a half dozen linux forums (now including nvnews) for help on my issue. I really would like to use linux and learn it but I need help. I bet if I knew a guru locally he could have it up an running in no time. Anyway PLEASE help..
                Ok please please please help me...

                Comment


                • #18
                  Originally posted by mirv View Post
                  They were fully functional at the time of their use (display lists & all). You can hardly expect a banshee to support the latest opengl versions however. If you're referring to the current level of support (and I'll use opengl as an example here) - I'm pretty sure everyone who can support the latest version already does. And we'll exclude opengl 3.2 from that list (considering the spec hasn't even been released yet). I find it interesting in that regard that the nvidia drivers put the version number in there - whilst true that it will likely include everything in 3.2, it's still a little pre-emptive.
                  I guess if you consider "fully functional" being limited to applications with 2-3 year old standards then in that respect I guess they were. To bad the rest of the world moved onto newer version of OGL and people were able to adopt them because of solutions such as nvidia's that offered the latest support. There is a reason why blobs are recommended over FOSS drivers when trying to do anything that required at least a semi recent version of openGL. How well did your Doom 3 for example run on your R200 with the foss drivers when it came out for example. Have you ever tried to use anything like maya or pro/E or anything else that required a more recent and advanced openGL stack? How well did wine apps run off that FOSS driver? While FOSS talks, debates and puts out roadmaps those Blobs allow for development to march on while the foss dude follow their 3 steps forward 2 steps back plan of attack.

                  Comment


                  • #19
                    Ok, you're turning this into an attack on open source (which, btw, was not in my original statement - it was simply that the drivers I used were open source...mostly).
                    And by the time doom3 came out, I was using firegl (ran fine, btw).
                    Nvidia's "latest support" for opengl is extensions to their own driver - manufacturer specific, not newer versions of opengl. Other companies do this as well.
                    And I did try maya - yep, it ran. Wine ran with milkshape3d under linux and r200 drivers. So if you want to keep attacking that, go ahead, but I'll no longer respond. This is way off topic, and all I originally intended was to correct something (that other companies have had linux support for quite some time too).

                    Comment


                    • #20
                      The fact is, if you want OpenGL, your only way out is to use nvidia cards and their blob, and thank god we at least have that option. http://linuxhaters.blogspot.com/2008...en-source.html

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X