Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Another Week, Another New NVIDIA Linux Driver

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #46
    Originally posted by Ant P. View Post
    A company that cares about its customers would not use proprietary software as a tool to force them onto an upgrade treadmill. nVidia is a company that only cares about its bottom line.
    Nvidia doesn't force you to anything. Now they are supporting 8 year old hardware and you'll be able to start newest Ubuntu 9.04 with old GF2. Do you still think they force its customers to anything?

    The only thing they do are rare updates of their legacy drivers but hey now they don't get the money from selling GF2 so why they still update drivers, are they working for free? Do they want to force you to buy new hardware?

    Ati on the contrary drops support for 3-4 year old r500. Aren't they force you to buy new chipsets? Think about it who cares more about its bottom line Ati or Nvidia?

    Comment


    • #47
      Originally posted by Ant P. View Post
      A company that cares about its customers would not use proprietary software as a tool to force them onto an upgrade treadmill. nVidia is a company that only cares about its bottom line.
      It's arguments like this that just make me laugh. I have two machines, my main and last-gen. My parents have the two before that. And even the oldest of those run the proprietary nVidia drivers just fine. Granted, I have a bit of circulation because I game a bit but it's still ancient. I've had one ATI card, it's thrown out because it didn't work worth crap under Linux and I have enough nVidia cards.

      I'm not blaming AMD for any of it, they've been catching up both on the open and closed source side since they bought ATI, but they started miles behind nVidia. My hope? RDR and basic 3D acceleration ready by the time the R800-based cards are released, I figure anything they're building now is built for at least that. Give me that and they got a sale coming.

      Comment


      • #48
        FWIW, the closed source work started at "ATI" a year or so before joining AMD, but the changes are pretty significant so it takes time to complete them and get them out the door. The open source work was definitely championed by the "AMD" folks, however.

        Comment


        • #49
          Originally posted by Ant P. View Post
          A company that cares about its customers would not use proprietary software as a tool to force them onto an upgrade treadmill. nVidia is a company that only cares about its bottom line.
          In all fairness, "customer care" is a marketing strategy and all companies care mostly about their bottom line. It just happens that people dont like to buy stuff from companies that "just dont care" so a lot of resources are spent on keeping up the impression that companies do care.

          Originally posted by jonnycat26 View Post
          Contrary to ATI, which is dropping support for older chipsets, NVidia maintains and updates legacy drivers for their older hardware.
          Since AMD/ATI is actively participating in developing the open source drivers that DO support the older chipsets, that statment is completely false. What AMD/ATI has done is drop support in the LATEST binary driver, which is no different to what Nvidia has already done. The only difference is that an OSS driver will always be updated as long as the hardware is used, while a close source one can at any time be permanently halted for many various reasons (spanning the whole range from "we think it's too old" company decisions to bankruptcy)


          But the real kicker will come in the next 1-2 years. Once the GPU is fully integrated in the CPU, people will finally understand why OSS drivers matter. Who would ever want to buy a CPU for which Linux driver support can be simply shut down for whatever reason.

          Comment


          • #50
            Originally posted by Stedevil View Post
            But the real kicker will come in the next 1-2 years. Once the GPU is fully integrated in the CPU, people will finally understand why OSS drivers matter. Who would ever want to buy a CPU for which Linux driver support can be simply shut down for whatever reason.
            And hey... maybe when that happens, I can pull my 4650 out of the closet and use it for something again. Until that day when I can use an ATI driver in Linux for something useful, it's staying in the closet.

            Comment


            • #51
              Originally posted by bridgman View Post
              FWIW, the closed source work started at "ATI" a year or so before joining AMD, but the changes are pretty significant so it takes time to complete them and get them out the door. The open source work was definitely championed by the "AMD" folks, however.
              and the community is loving you guys for that


              please keep on improving the fglrx driver so that I and more folks will be able to pull out their old nvidia card and replace it with and ATI/AMD one,

              at the moment it's not acceptable since it still interferes a lot with kernel internals (e.g. producing BUG messages with fully preemption, not supporting preemptive rcu [nvidia does !], hardlocking the box easily when switching through VT and X, rather unstable and slow-reacting compositing)


              and don't forget: improved energy savings -> powerplay with downclocking and downvolting


              from what I've read a significant difference at nvidia is that they're able to pass direct rendering through compositing (-> working fine opengl apps when the desktop is using compiz / kwin with effects)

              thanks

              Comment


              • #52
                My $80 nvidia card was much easier to setup and performs tons better than my friends $300 ati card.

                'nuff said.

                (yes, in 1-2 years things will be better - and my opinion will change then, not now.)

                Comment


                • #53
                  With the right distro you only have to run one script for fglrx or nvidia I would not say that this is compilicated, but when the driver has errors the best packageing does not make it better.

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    Unless the script is on the desktop labelled "run-me-to-install-driver.sh", it is not helpful.

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      I could create buttons to run it, but I want that the users don't have got fear to use command line - even text mode. I only tell em how to run it.

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        Aren't *.deb packages able to hold scripts in them or something? Why a *.sh installer then?

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          I update those scripts very often, if i would package em i would have got maybe 1000 revisions so far, thats not needed. Also updateing the scripts only with update-scripts-kanotix.sh is much faster than doing a full dist-upgrade just to get new 3d scripts.

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            Well, Envy [1] has been available for years already for a nice click a button to install ATI or Nvidia drivers. I used to use it to update both Nvidia and ATI comps and it worked really well.
                            But ever since it was officially adopted, the usefulness has gone down the toilet. It used to be fully up to date, but now it takes months for new driver versions to be added.

                            [1] http://albertomilone.com/nvidia_scripts1.html

                            Comment


                            • #59
                              I know Envy, my scripts have been out longer and are always uptodate. The only difference is the way how Nvidia drivers are installed, for fglrx my script also has Debian packageing, but the Nvidia installer is called directly then from that I create a dkms package just for the kernel module. Envy however creates a Nvidia debian package. I tried that approach too, but the driver packages are too different, even small changes will break it. Nice to have, but harder to adopt if something is changed.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X