Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Lots Of Ubuntu Mir Changes Expected Next Week

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #76
    Originally posted by sireangelus View Post
    guys.. i'm sorry.. but using gpl3 as a window manager isn't legally dangerous??? won't all the app that run atop of it be considered derivative work?
    What are you sorry for? You didn't do anything wrong... at least I don't think you did.

    No and no.

    Comment


    • #77
      Originally posted by GreatEmerald View Post
      Well, last time I checked, C++ compilers kept complaining about using "deprecated functionality" when given well-written C code
      Deprecated means, old/better version available. Not invalid.
      C code is valid C++ however it's not the recommended approach as C is
      very old and new better stuff have came to use.

      Originally posted by jrch2k8 View Post
      1.) true
      2.) this has more shade of gray than black or white
      3.) kernel have many layers and only 1 of them talk to the hardware
      4.) partially correct
      5.) is exactly in the middle no more no less

      to short answer 2,4, is true that an display servers don't query the graphic card / input directly in C/ASM/registers like a kernel module would do but is true also this module for many operations just pipe the raw hardware data to an upper layer as is also true you are still close enough to the hardware to need hardware/kernel layer compliant data structures. sure the kernels provide small layers in between to provide some normalization for know operations but even so is closer to kernel/hardware than to high level userspace

      to explain 5, wayland and most display server have 2 faces which is why they are in the middle, the first face is hell lot closer to the kernel/hardware than any toolkit ever be and the other face is the definition of the user accesible API which abstract the whole lot of kernel/hardware operations to be used for toolkits that by definition of abstraction is very far from the kernel/hardware
      Yes. However none of this stuff makes C++ not a valid choice which were my point, but of course
      a display server is closer to the hardware than stuff above it However it isn't close enough
      to require registry pickling or anything like that.

      C++ gives you much better ways to structure your code and makes it easier to abstract
      it for multiple back-ends. So in many cases it is a wiser choice.

      Originally posted by LinuxGamer View Post
      Really don't even try these are web forums a Real Post on C and C++ Kernel systemd wayland Etc and the level of what is what will be a whole day of wasted time if not 2 or 3 there are many blogs on it and whos really on these Forums any ways? Ubuntu Zealots? i see about 5 of them jump out any time you say any thing about Ubuntu Mir Etc little babys who can't take facts

      http://www.urbandictionary.com/defin...buntu%20Zealot
      What? I don't even understand what you are trying to say.
      jrch2k8 wrote a valid, facts oriented, post and you goes on about Ubuntu Zealots. Really?

      Comment


      • #78
        Originally posted by jrch2k8 View Post
        1.) true
        2.) this has more shade of gray than black or white
        3.) kernel have many layers and only 1 of them talk to the hardware
        4.) partially correct

        to short answer 2,4, is true that an display servers don't query the graphic card / input directly in C/ASM/registers like a kernel module would do but is true also this module for many operations just pipe the raw hardware data to an upper layer as is also true you are still close enough to the hardware to need hardware/kernel layer compliant data structures. sure the kernels provide small layers in between to provide some normalization for know operations but even so is closer to kernel/hardware than to high level userspace
        I think this is irrelevant when comparing C and C++. Both are completely capable of accessing raw pointers and managing memory directly.
        The important difference is that it is much more difficult to make C++ self conscious of its own memory use.

        Example: if you use the inline keyword in C++, the compiler might still choose not to inline the code. The function might end up in a different part of the memory than the one it is called from, a part of memory that might not be available at the time the function is called, ending in a page fault.
        This can happen with many C++ constructs (inheritance, exceptions), but is not relevant in user space. The kernel makes sure pages are available to applications when they need it.

        C and C++ are both at the same (low) level in terms of memory access (for data management), compared to script languages and others. C and assembly are low level compared to C++ in terms of memory footprint control (important for kernels, real-time code, embedded systems with memory and the like).
        So if the display server is not in kernel space, C and C++ are (roughly) equally suitable for it.

        Comment


        • #79
          Originally posted by erendorn View Post
          Example: if you use the inline keyword in C++, the compiler might still choose not to inline the code.
          AFAIK, that's true for C, too.

          Comment


          • #80
            Originally posted by jayrulez View Post
            What are you sorry for? You didn't do anything wrong... at least I don't think you did.

            No and no.

            would you care to elaborate?

            Comment

            Working...
            X