Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Mir Display Server Now Uses XKB Common

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Mir Display Server Now Uses XKB Common

    Phoronix: Mir Display Server Now Uses XKB Common

    Similar to Wayland, Mir now is using the xkbcommon library...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTM1Mzc

  • #2
    Is every fart of the Mir code repository newsworthy?

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by 0xCAFE View Post
      Is every fart of the Mir code repository newsworthy?
      Yes!

      Anywho, will a testing version of Mir and Unity Next land in early daily builds 13.10?
      I'm really looking forward to testing it.

      Comment


      • #4
        Daniel Stone must be carefull about it, if it happens that:
        1) Canonical do not know how XKB works or
        2) Canonical needs to control the project

        XKB will forked. Sorry, it's company policy.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by sacridex View Post
          Yes!

          Anywho, will a testing version of Mir and Unity Next land in early daily builds 13.10?
          I'm really looking forward to testing it.
          If you can test Ubuntu for Phones than yes. On desktop it can take some more time.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by valeriodean View Post
            Daniel Stone must be carefull about it, if it happens that:
            1) Canonical do not know how XKB works or
            2) Canonical needs to control the project

            XKB will forked. Sorry, it's company policy.
            I'd probably be pulled from upstream and remain compatible.
            Not everything is done the Canonical Way™

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by BO$$ View Post
              Go Mir!! There can be only one!
              And it won't be Mir. As Canonical stated, they develop Mir aimed especially for Unity, so everyone that does not use Unity (like Red Hat or Suse, you know, those companies that actually make money with Linux, unlike Canonical) will rather back up Wayland, since Mir may just break (intentionally or not) for other DEs. No sane company will make use exclusively of a product where they have no say about the development at all, so Wayland is naturally the way to go, not Mir.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Vim_User View Post
                since Mir may just break (intentionally or not) for other DEs. No sane company will make use exclusively of a product where they have no say about the development at all, so Wayland is naturally the way to go, not Mir.
                Orly?
                Let's just assume, Mir will be fucking awesome and will beat the shit out of Wayland:
                Why exactly would anyone NOT use Mir and go for Wayland instead? If Canonical decides to go another direction, Mir can be forked and everyone is still happy.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I'm asking for it one more time - i know that your butts hurt, but stop this (pro|anti)(Mir|Wayland) nonsense. I'm a Ubuntu fan, I'm looking forward for UnityNext and Mir, but that's what happening on this forum (and not only) since Canonical's announcement is ridiculous, childish and pointless. Writing "Wayland" or "Mir" causes a chain reaction of shitstorm. Come on guys, is this the way the OpenSource community behaves?!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by sacridex View Post
                    Why exactly would anyone NOT use Mir and go for Wayland instead? If Canonical decides to go another direction, Mir can be forked and everyone is still happy.
                    Because it's not collaboratively developed? Because contributing upstream requires signing contributor license agreement to Canonical that allows them to release it as closed source software? Because it's under L/GPLv3 that cannot be used in some environments? Because even if you fork it you still have to abide to the propietary Mir protocol and you are still stuck with the restrictive L/GPLv3 license (both Gnome and KDE are mostly under L/GPLv2 so they can't use the code from Mir without relicensing)? Because it's not written with other desktop environments in mind (in stark contrast to Wayland that's designed to be supported by multiple compositors)? Because its entire existence is entirely pointless in the first place? Mir will never be the only display server protocol because of the deliberate choises made by Canonical in terms of its licensing and design.

                    Originally posted by sacridex View Post
                    Come on guys, is this the way the OpenSource community behaves?!
                    A large reason why Canonical gets all the shit it gets is because they are incapable of working in collaborative open source environments. Forking projects left and right. Not contributing patches upstream. Abusing their market dominance to create incompatible standards. Taking openly developed code behind closed doors and releasing it back months later with numerous additions without at any point contacting the upstream. Using contributor license agreements... and so on and so forth.
                    Last edited by Teho; 04-17-2013, 09:53 AM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by BO$$ View Post
                      If this happens and looking at the deveolpment pace of wayland it looks like we will be on X.org for a long time. Which I have nothing against. I still consider both Wayland and Mir as just fads adding nothing for the end user, just ways for those programmers to think they're the shit. X.org could have been improved, no need to reinvent the wheel. This whole thing will create horrible pains for the end user just so these people can get their way.
                      the problem witb "Xorg could have been improved" is backwards compaitibility and an established standard. X12 would be assumed to be backwards compatible with X11, and despite X.org being the X consortium now (I'm actually not sure if they are the sole member..) they'd still have to listen to anyone with any stake in X11 for X12 development.

                      hence Wayland. No one beyond the Wayland devs has any say in what happens, limited politics, no guarentee of backwards compatibility and therefore no mandatory legacy cruft. that being said Wayland IS BC due to XWayland which is good.

                      oh also X12 would probably be forced to speak the traditional X protocol which you can see why on the Wayland faq that's an issue. also it was a chance to experiment with the idea of "clients in control" instead of "centrallized server in control" though Mir is going back on that.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        X for now, Wayland for later.

                        I don't get all the Rah! Rah! Rah! Mir! For now it is a proof of concept, only made possible by all the groundwork laid for Wayland. On top of that it is one isolated development, for one specific variant of a consumer oriented Linux distro. It's probably exiting news for the users of that particular strain of Ubuntu, but the larger GNU/Linux community has no stake in it.

                        Positive attitude towards Wayland is quite understandable. It is backed by multiple (large) entities, like Red Hat, Intel, etc. It is on friendly footing with X.org. Multiple toolkit and desktop projects are planning to support it as the display server in the future. It takes time to mature, but nobody is rushing it and that is a good thing. It makes the odds of having to carry around less than optimal, early design decissions a lot smaller.

                        X is far from dead and useless. It is old and creaky, but it still powers an awful lot of *Nix displays. I don't get all the clammoring for something else "right now!" X has more than enough life left to see us through untill the transition to a new display architecture can take place smoothly.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I believe the only thing not using xkbcommon for wayland support is kmscon, and now mir. I believe everything else ("GTK+, Qt, Clutter...") is using it (only) for wayland support. Which I think it was created for. So this is another entirely expected and appropriate case of mir using stuff that was created to make wayland possible.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Whatever. ubuntu is the most decent linux distribution for personal use that exist. If they decide to use mir instead of wayland, cool then, users shouldn't notice it anyways.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Vim_User View Post
                              No sane company will make use exclusively of a product where they have no say about the development at all, so Wayland is naturally the way to go, not Mir.
                              Whats the marketshare of Windows in the corporate market, again?

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X