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Mir Display Server Now Uses XKB Common

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  • #31
    Originally posted by Redi44 View Post
    A) From this discussion?
    B) Nah, I just need to meet more Linux users and less Mac users....
    What discussion? Canonical is entitled to do whatever they want with the open source software is available around for their own interest, They are not obligated to use nor contribute to any upstream project they are not interested in . There's no discussion , just some whining. whaaaa whaaa whaaaaa

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    • #32
      Originally posted by intellivision View Post
      Well, considering both Wayland and Mir will be targeting OpenGL ES drivers it really isn't breaking any standards that will hurt the other project.
      It's great if the drivers won't cause problems and probably even if they did it's something that could be worked over just like the Android drivers, just easier. I'm more worried about the clients. As Ubuntu gains more and more popularity on desktop it's likely we will get more and more games and applications and such that need to interact with display server. Most of it will be abstracted away thanks to toolkits and libaries like Qt and SDL but there's bound to be at least some applications that will go their own way. I really don't want to see Mir only hence Ubuntu only applications. Thanks to the fragmentation caused by Canonical, display server APIs are becoming similar mess for application developers that we used to have with audio. I doubt that rises anyone's confidence in the platform.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Siekacz View Post
        Come on guys, is this the way the OpenSource community behaves?!
        Yes.

        Originally posted by Alex Sarmiento View Post
        Whatever. ubuntu is the most decent linux distribution for personal use that exist.
        Sounds like an opinion. I disagree.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by dee. View Post
          I had no idea what I was doing when I installed my first Linux distro. Managed to get the whole thing messed up in a matter of days with some basic "ooh what does this button do" behaviour. Picked up the pieces and kept on playing with it until it started making sense. Now I'm at a point where I can even manage to fix most of my mistakes without reinstalling the entire system.

          For that matter I know a bunch of people who are total noobs with computers and still use Linux. Heck, some of them even use Fedora. Being a computer expert may have been a requirement for using Linux 10 years ago but not anymore.
          I don't think you are the usual PC user. Most of the Linux newcomers are people who broke down their Win install and need something to use until the main problem is fixed or people who got convinced to use it IMHO.

          Originally posted by Alex Sarmiento View Post
          What discussion? Canonical is entitled to do whatever they want with the open source software is available around for their own interest, They are not obligated to use nor contribute to any upstream project they are not interested in . There's no discussion , just some whining. whaaaa whaaa whaaaaa
          You are on Moronix, not on Canonical forum. If you expected anything else then whining then you were mistaken.

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by Teho View Post
            It's great if the drivers won't cause problems and probably even if they did it's something that could be worked over just like the Android drivers, just easier. I'm more worried about the clients. As Ubuntu gains more and more popularity on desktop it's likely we will get more and more games and applications and such that need to interact with display server. Most of it will be abstracted away thanks to toolkits and libaries like Qt and SDL but there's bound to be at least some applications that will go their own way. I really don't want to see Mir only hence Ubuntu only applications. Thanks to the fragmentation caused by Canonical, display server APIs are becoming similar mess for application developers that we used to have with audio. I doubt that rises anyone's confidence in the platform.
            If the toolkits and libraries like GTK+ and Qt support both Wayland and Mir, it would be pretty easy to target either platform by simply updating the relevant toolkit code in your program to one that supports both.
            However, the less than enthusiastic response from the Qt, GTK+ and EFL camps regarding supporting Mir upstream will only serve to exacerbate the fragmentation problem rather than remedy it.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by Redi44 View Post
              I don't think you are the usual PC user. Most of the Linux newcomers are people who broke down their Win install and need something to use until the main problem is fixed or people who got convinced to use it IMHO.
              Got any hard data on that? Have you conducted any kind of statistically significant survey, poll, investigation or questionnaire for Linux users?

              And if the answer to either question is no, how could you possibly be qualified to make any kind of assumptions about the reasons why people try Linux?

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              • #37
                Originally posted by dee. View Post
                Got any hard data on that? Have you conducted any kind of statistically significant survey, poll, investigation or questionnaire for Linux users?

                And if the answer to either question is no, how could you possibly be qualified to make any kind of assumptions about the reasons why people try Linux?
                I tried linux because it was free, and some friend told me it was more stable than windows . I remember my first try was one of the red hat distros before fedora existed and I remember struggling to play mp3 files LOL, also video drivers sucked at that time, could not get my 56k modem working, drivers where a mess.

                I rapidly went back to windows, then 2-3 years later I heard of ubuntu decided to give it a try and everything worked out of the box, maybe thats why it has become so popular.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by TheOne View Post

                  I rapidly went back to windows, then 2-3 years later I heard of ubuntu decided to give it a try and everything worked out of the box, maybe thats why it has become so popular.
                  To be fair, all mainstream Linux distributions have improved in usability drasticaly from the old Red Hat Linux days. The hardware vendors are more cooperative, the commercial Linux distributions have contributed quite a bit etc.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by TheOne View Post
                    I tried linux because it was free, and some friend told me it was more stable than windows . I remember my first try was one of the red hat distros before fedora existed and I remember struggling to play mp3 files LOL, also video drivers sucked at that time, could not get my 56k modem working, drivers where a mess.

                    I rapidly went back to windows, then 2-3 years later I heard of ubuntu decided to give it a try and everything worked out of the box, maybe thats why it has become so popular.
                    Thanks for sharing, but that wasn't what I asked.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      I'd probably be pulled from upstream and remain compatible.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by intellivision View Post
                        If the toolkits and libraries like GTK+ and Qt support both Wayland and Mir, it would be pretty easy to target either platform by simply updating the relevant toolkit code in your program to one that supports both.
                        My point was that there are applications that don't use these toolkits or libaries. If these applications are propietary then there isn't much else you can do except built some sort of compatibility layer, ugly stuff.

                        Originally posted by intellivision View Post
                        However, the less than enthusiastic response from the Qt, GTK+ and EFL camps regarding supporting Mir upstream will only serve to exacerbate the fragmentation problem rather than remedy it.
                        I don't see how. It would be terribly unfortuante if developers got the idea that Mir is somehow accepted standard or anything other than a propietary API for Ubuntu operaiting system. However I still don't think any of the major toolkits will reject Mir backends, it's just that probably no other compositor will implement the Mir protocol.

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                        • #42
                          I'm really looking forward to testing it.

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                          • #43
                            Originally posted by Teho View Post
                            However I still don't think any of the major toolkits will reject Mir backends
                            Well, accepting code upstream means risking to have to maintain it, which the major toolkits aren't very found of for any random platform. It is very likely that Mir backends will be supported by Canonical only, and not be merged in upstream toolkits.

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by dee. View Post
                              Thanks for sharing, but that wasn't what I asked.
                              The point is that the majority of people that tries a linux distro is because it's free and if it works with their hardware they will keep it. Most people I know have started using linux because of it been free. On the youngster community it wasn't taken seriously because of it's lack in gaming support, but that have started to change with steam.

                              Anyways a study on why people started using linux would be interesting I bet many people do because of its cost

                              So combine zero cost, ease of use and install, and applications to make what they want, thats the point of cross-platform development, so people can test applications on there OS of choice, and later they can opt to switch OS with the confident of still having their apps

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                              • #45
                                Originally posted by TheOne View Post
                                The point is that the majority of people that tries a linux distro is because it's free and if it works with their hardware they will keep it.
                                Again: What kind of survey, poll, study, investigation or tea-leaf reading have you conducted? Do you have any statistics to back that up?

                                Most people I know have started using linux because of it been free.
                                Ok. How many people do you know? 10? 100? Let's say 100 to be generous. How many people there are in total who use Linux? Millions. Maybe over a hundred million. So why do you think you can extrapolate from "most people I know" to "majority of all people"?

                                On the youngster community it wasn't taken seriously because of it's lack in gaming support, but that have started to change with steam.
                                What is "the youngster community"?

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