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Differences Between X.Org, Wayland & Mir

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  • #11
    if canonical wants to make a uber-awesome desktop maybe they should start working in getting rid of that putrid brown sepia theme.

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    • #12
      Originally posted by garegin View Post
      if canonical wants to make a uber-awesome desktop maybe they should start working in getting rid of that putrid brown sepia theme.
      They have switched from the brown theme with 10.04 LTS. Not that I think the new one is better, but I would think that is a matter of taste.

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      • #13
        Originally posted by Vim_User View Post
        They have switched from the brown theme with 10.04 LTS. Not that I think the new one is better, but I would think that is a matter of taste.
        The new theme is terrible too, at least gnome 3 looks sane even though its usability is utter rubbish.

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        • #14
          So, one the one hand they're promoting that they're using Google's Protobuf for IPC, on the other hand they're saying they, unlike Wayland, don't really care about IPC, but about creating some awesome "thingy" that's useful ("unlike Wayland").
          Does anyone else see the irony in this? Also, could this get any more technical? "Thingy", really?

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          • #15
            the author use "things" a bit everywhere and it shows a lack of understanding.

            he's also trying to expose mir as better because mir "includes ipc, libraries AND graphic toolkit AND you have no choice but to use THEIR toolkit". He also makes clear that ANYONE trying to implement their toolkit on top regardless will get broken by their change, and dare I say, probably voluntarily. i.e. it's mir's ubuntu way or the highway (or, punt intended, wayland.)

            That's why KDE/GNOME will not go on mir. There is no point. Half of KDE/GNOME is the graphical toolkit (which does more than that, too): QT & GTK.

            Mir also seems to admit they're also not good enough to implement their own ipc, so they use protobuf. hey that's fine, but don't go touting that it's because you're better, if it's because you just don't wanna roll your own.

            Oh yeah, and "artistic" differences, I mean, that makes me so confident. Seems like mir is another upstart.

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            • #16
              We're the way of the world!



              Get used to it!

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              • #17
                Originally posted by Vim_User View Post
                Neither Nvidia nor AMD are developing their drivers for the consumer, both companies are developing for the professional user in the first place, having support for consumer cards mostly as a byproduct (this may change with more games coming to Linux, but we have to wait and see). Professional users tend to be more conservative and are, AFAIK, rather running distributions like RHEL or SLED/S, so it is more likely that Wayland will be the first target for proprietary drivers. But since both solutions, Wayland and Mir, seem to use EGL drivers this shouldn't be a major problem.
                It was this way till Valve jumped in.

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by Pawlerson View Post
                  It was this way till Valve jumped in.
                  It will continue to be that way until valve proves it is likely to provide a larger revenue stream. That may be a hard sell, even if they sell a lot of systems, workstation cards are expensive, while valve is probably going to try to cut expenses by negotiating a deal to cut prices.

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by balouba View Post
                    Seems like mir is another upstart.
                    Although Upstart was started at a time when it was needed, and it's just that it's been supplanted by something better since.

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by Pawlerson View Post
                      It was this way till Valve jumped in.
                      We would like to have it that way, no question, but it simply isn't. Nvidia and AMD don't care about the 2% Linux gamers, which mostly own cheap mid-range cards or below (I know, before they all chime in, there are exceptions, people using faster/expensive cards, but how many are they, 5% of the those 2%?). They care about professionals, with cards where one card is more than 1000$, sometimes even a multiple of that, those that bring the reputation in the business market.
                      This may change in the future, but we have to see if it really happens.

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