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Intel Beignet Is Working Out Surprisingly Well For OpenCL On Linux

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  • Intel Beignet Is Working Out Surprisingly Well For OpenCL On Linux

    Phoronix: Intel Beignet Is Working Out Surprisingly Well For OpenCL On Linux

    Beignet is the project out of Intel's Open-Source Technology Center for exposing GPGPU/compute capabilities out of Ivy Bridge hardware and newer when using a fully open-source Linux stack. While Beignet differs greatly from Gallium3D's Clover state tracker, this Intel-specific open-source OpenCL implementation is working out quite well for Ubuntu Linux...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTc3Njk

  • #2
    You can try daily builds of Beignet on Ubuntu 12.04 from my PPA:
    https://launchpad.net/~pali/+archive...vers/+packages
    Now it is compiling with llvm3.5 without problems.

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    • #3
      Thanks so much for this, Michael.
      I really hope the desktop will start writing to opencl soon instead of simply relying on the cpu (including simd). Gnome is especially bad about doing that, imho.

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      • #4
        it works with trusty?

        Originally posted by pali View Post
        You can try daily builds of Beignet on Ubuntu 12.04 from my PPA:
        https://launchpad.net/~pali/+archive...vers/+packages
        Now it is compiling with llvm3.5 without problems.

        it works with trusty?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by rikkinho View Post
          it works with trusty?
          No, packages are only for precise.

          See: http://www.phoronix.com/forums/showt...04-Precise-LTS

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          • #6
            IMO, OpenCL puts some serious use to IGPs. Considering the price of intel processors, in a system with discrete graphics the GPU is a decent chunk of change going to waste. Even if the GPU were worth as little as 3% of the entire processor, in some cases that's enough money to get you another 2GB of RAM, maybe more. I suppose that if you're not playing a game there's no reason you couldn't just use the discrete GPU, but, if you can combine IGP with discrete in a single OpenCL task, that would be a nice bonus.

            I wish folding@home would support beignet, but, what I REALLY wish is if intel graphics could support physx.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
              IMO, OpenCL puts some serious use to IGPs. Considering the price of intel processors, in a system with discrete graphics the GPU is a decent chunk of change going to waste. Even if the GPU were worth as little as 3% of the entire processor, in some cases that's enough money to get you another 2GB of RAM, maybe more. I suppose that if you're not playing a game there's no reason you couldn't just use the discrete GPU, but, if you can combine IGP with discrete in a single OpenCL task, that would be a nice bonus.

              I wish folding@home would support beignet, but, what I REALLY wish is if intel graphics could support physx.
              I thought physx was closed to all but nvidia?
              Wikipedia seems to back me up on this:
              Any CUDA-ready GeForce graphics card (series 8 and newer, with a minimum of 256MB of video memory[13]) can take advantage of PhysX without the need to install a dedicated PhysX card.
              Nvidia really pisses me off. They've got some amazing engineers, but they do crap like that, continuing to only partially support opencl, and http://streamcomputing.eu/blog/2014-...snt-want-know/

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              • #8
                Is all the code completely intel specific? Because the gallium3d clover state tracker is at opencl 1.1. And they both use llvm backends...

                Edit: Also, when multiple llvm versions are installed, PATH should be set to the bin/ directory from the correct llvm version when compiling beignet, because it's running clang while compiling.
                Last edited by ChrisXY; 08-30-2014, 07:36 PM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by liam View Post
                  Nvidia really pisses me off. They've got some amazing engineers, but they do crap like that, continuing to only partially support opencl
                  AMD really pisses me off. They've got some amazing GPUs, but they do crap software that can't compile large kernels, continuing to only partially support opencl.

                  It seems that the best Opencl compiler right now is the Intel cpu one.

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                  • #10
                    I was quite surprised, but when I ran SmallLuxGPU (the engine used in LuxMark) on my Intel i5 4440 with a HD4600 iGPU, the iGPU rendered faster than the CPU, and together it was (naturally) twice as fast as just using the CPU, which I was quite happy with.

                    If OpenCL support is perfected to work on more complex software, that basically turned my cpu from a quad to an 8 core

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                    • #11
                      anyone tried e.g. matrix multiplication or so? you know, something more useful instead of that luxrender.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Sdar View Post
                        AMD really pisses me off. They've got some amazing GPUs, but they do crap software that can't compile large kernels, continuing to only partially support opencl.

                        It seems that the best Opencl compiler right now is the Intel cpu one.
                        Cute, but you're missing the point, fanboy.
                        Nvidia actually has top flight devs, and in general the manpower, who could write such an implementation.
                        Nvidia is utterly blatent about just capturing users. That's what bothers me, and why I'm confused as to why they have their defenders in the linux community.

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                        • #13
                          Is it possible to use this in parrallel with a radeon card? Ie have the radeon do the graphics and the intel 3770 gpu to handle the opencl stuff??

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by 89c51 View Post
                            Is it possible to use this in parrallel with a radeon card? Ie have the radeon do the graphics and the intel 3770 gpu to handle the opencl stuff??
                            Yes. It's a possible application for gaming: let the iGPU, which is less powerful to render but enough for other things, and does not require slow bus transfers, do general computation (e.g.: physics), which are nowadays not done using OpenCL because of such transfers, among other reasons, and the dGPU render. I believe AMD's HSA helps here, but I'm not sure how (avoids some transfers...?). Thanks to the ICD model, which, AFAIK, both Beignet and Mesa support, you could even switch the OpenCL providers.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by zeealpal View Post
                              I was quite surprised, but when I ran SmallLuxGPU (the engine used in LuxMark) on my Intel i5 4440 with a HD4600 iGPU, the iGPU rendered faster than the CPU, and together it was (naturally) twice as fast as just using the CPU, which I was quite happy with.

                              If OpenCL support is perfected to work on more complex software, that basically turned my cpu from a quad to an 8 core
                              Imagine what you'd be missing out on using an APU. Keep in mind an A10-7850 has 2.4 million transistors - that is ONE MILLION more than the i7-4770K, and about half of the entire chip (including cache, CPU cores, memory controller, NB, etc) is just GPU. If AMD can get OpenCL fully functional on APUs, they're going to have something that seriously gives Intel processors a run for their money. But, until that happens, or, until we get more applications that'll actually take advantage of openCL, intel is still a better overall product.

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