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Intel Is Launching An Interesting Bay Trail NUC Next Week

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  • Intel Is Launching An Interesting Bay Trail NUC Next Week

    Phoronix: Intel Is Launching An Interesting Bay Trail NUC Next Week

    Intel next week is expected to begin shipping a new NUC Kit that is fan-less and suited for "value-conscious businesses and organizations." This new NUC Kit has just a single-core "Bay Trail" processor that runs at 5 Watts but overall it looks like it could have some interesting applications if the price is right...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTY3MDc

  • #2
    Boycott x86!
    Incentive gpgpu!

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by amagnoni View Post
      Boycott x86!
      Incentive gpgpu!
      Not sure what you mean, if you want to use the GPU for everything, that's not the way to go. If something is not high-performance critical, then it doesn't make sense developing on a GPU, because it's hard and it will stay hard, furthermore, latencies are higher when using a GPU.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by amagnoni View Post
        Boycott x86!
        Incentive gpgpu!
        Nope Hail HSA. Want to see heterogenous cpus and gpus in the mix. Like Puma cores (4), SteamRoller cores (2), GCN cores 8, noGcn cores 4.

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        • #5
          I'm looking for a small but yet powerful hardware to build a homemade router, running pfSense, and this one should be very interesting if not overly priced. Yet the hardware support will be in balance

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by phoronix View Post
            Phoronix: Intel Is Launching An Interesting Bay Trail NUC Next Week

            Intel next week is expected to begin shipping a new NUC Kit that is fan-less and suited for "value-conscious businesses and organizations." This new NUC Kit has just a single-core "Bay Trail" processor that runs at 5 Watts but overall it looks like it could have some interesting applications if the price is right...

            http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTY3MDc
            I would call this product release a "direct shot", albeit a possibly/probably more expensive one (relative to most ARM devices), at ARM-based systems.

            For developers that are heavily invested in "x86 code", there is a real attraction/advantage to this product since the "jump to ARM" for them or their customers might not be acceptable. It might come down to driver support. We might all stipulate that drivers tend to arrive in OS like Windoze and Apple before they arrive in Linux and BSD; that's the nature of the business with the support from those vendors.

            The selection of the "target market", as mentioned by Intel, is interesting:

            a pint-sized powerhouse for value-conscious businesses and organizations.
            - Would I want to play games on this device? Not the fancy graphics-driven games, but 2D games might be "ok" and CLI/text ("yawn") should be fine.
            - Would I want to watch video via this device? I would try HD because I am curious, but SD might be the better choice on this device. Flash-based video performance could be interesting.
            - Would I want to listen to audio via this device? Possibly; "Multi-channel digital audio via HDMI interface" (quoting Intel) could be interesting.
            - Would this device be suitable for a business environment where "light web surfing" (no Youtube and such) and web-based office applications? Probably.
            - Would I want to run Micro$loth Office "bloatware" on this device? Probably not.
            - Would I run Windoze on this device? If I had to; I would try a few Linux distros first, provided there was nothing "Windoze specific" that was required.
            - Would I run LTS "Linux Terminal Services" or similar on this device (much less "bloat" compared to Windoze Remote Desktop Client)? It would be worth a try and probably perform pretty decent.

            I would also be curious if "embedded Windoze" could be installed on this device. That could make Windoze Remote Desktop Client a possibility.

            At the end of the day, I think Michael could do a nice job of benchmarking this little device, assuming he has the desire, time, and money.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Morpheus View Post
              I'm looking for a small but yet powerful hardware to build a homemade router, running pfSense, and this one should be very interesting if not overly priced. Yet the hardware support will be in balance
              With only 1 onboard GigE port, assumed to be for the "inside LAN", any added networking would be via USB attachment and potentially slower than GigE. I wouldn't use this to attach to Google Fiber, but lower speed broadband services should perform decently through this device.

              A firewall based on this device might take a little work to get it all going, but it would be an interesting and worthy project for a "geek".

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by NotMine999 View Post
                With only 1 onboard GigE port, assumed to be for the "inside LAN", any added networking would be via USB attachment and potentially slower than GigE. I wouldn't use this to attach to Google Fiber, but lower speed broadband services should perform decently through this device.

                A firewall based on this device might take a little work to get it all going, but it would be an interesting and worthy project for a "geek".
                If even a PCIe x1 slot is provided, I already see the Gb card Michael showed a few days ago as a good addon. Also, I'm not a lucky internet user, I only have a shitty internet connection, ADSL that only reach 2.2Mbps practical download speed (theoric speed at 2.87Mbps, but with many, many errors on the line). So in this case, USB adapter is not a stopping point. I plan to leverage the service level of my home network, as I want to deploy more devices that I need network optimizations for (as ADSL sucks, I have to get some DNS caching, for example; a real DHCP suited for LTSP deployments needs also a real software to do it; openssh router connection to permit living-room bluray player to go to youtube without my ISP peering problem with Google; and all that things are not in the CPU power reach of my WRT320N).

                I need to become more software-independant for my network hardware

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Article
                  This single-core Bay Trail NUC has one USB 3.0 port, two USB 2.0 ports, three USB 2.0 ports via internal headers, 4GB of eMMC storage onboard, one 2.5-inch HDD/SDD slot, Gigabit Ethernet, wireless card support (but not installed by default), and uses a +12V 36W AC/DC power adapter.
                  Great, this implies the presence of at least 1x mPCIe slot.

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                  • #10
                    This seems pretty shitty.

                    Only single-core? Mobile ARM chipsets used in smartphones are quad-core and octo-core while still passively cooled.
                    Only one USB 3.0 port? I would rather have seen 4 ports.

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