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Intel Iris Pro Linux Graphics Yield Some Wins Against Windows

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  • Intel Iris Pro Linux Graphics Yield Some Wins Against Windows

    Phoronix: Intel Iris Pro Linux Graphics Yield Some Wins Against Windows

    For the past few days at Phoronix we have begun looking extensively at the Intel Iris Pro 5200 graphics under Linux, since receiving the System76 Galago UltraPro. The Iris Pro 5200 are the new high-end Intel Haswell graphics that have 128MB of embedded video RAM on the die, which should yield a nice performance boost when properly implemented within the Intel Linux driver. Already our testing has found the Iris Pro performance on Linux has doubled with open-source driver improvements since Haswell's launch. Now we're out today with our first Intel Iris Pro OpenGL gaming benchmarks between Ubuntu Linux and Microsoft Windows 8 for this Intel Core i7 Ultrabook.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=19116

  • #2
    Even when it was behind, Linux was pretty close in most of these with the new drivers. And considering where we were just recently, this is a dramatic improvement! I only hope it keeps approaching a graceful and powerful level of performance as development continues.

    Is there another article already that compares Iris Pro to Ivy Bridge?

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    • #3
      I just come here to put out one suggestion. Given that Steam is on Linux for a while, can we start using some games on Steam as benchmarks? Just as many Windows reviews do? That could both provide more useful information for the Linux gaming crowd, and foster grounds of improvement for real games that many people play. (I am not saying current benchmarks are useless, but there is definitely a disconnection between Windows reviews and Linux ones. Using common and popular games could significantly reduce this gap.)

      Then whenever someone doubts the usability of Linux as a gaming platform, we can simply point it to these benchmark: this is the performance you know in Windows, and Linux is better/same/slightly slower, etc.
      Last edited by wujj123456; 09-19-2013, 02:48 AM.

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      • #4
        Show us in benchmark min/max FPS because avg. nothing say about preformance. If Ubuntu wins in OpenArena with Windows, and you say it is very good than I have no more comments about you test procedure ...

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        • #5
          Originally posted by wujj123456 View Post
          I just come here to put out one suggestion. Given that Steam is on Linux for a while, can we start using some games on Steam as benchmarks? Just as many Windows reviews do? That could both provide more useful information for the Linux gaming crowd, and foster grounds of improvement for real games that many people play. (I am not saying current benchmarks are useless, but there is definitely a disconnection between Windows reviews and Linux ones. Using common and popular games could significantly reduce this gap.)

          Then whenever someone doubts the usability of Linux as a gaming platform, we can simply point it to these benchmark: this is the performance you know in Windows, and Linux is better/same/slightly slower, etc.
          +1 I was going to ask the same. Michael has said in the past that he has had some issues benchmarking steam games, but we really need it, at least as a baseline. Does the source engine (half-life2 / portal / dota / cs / left4dead) compare to openarena/xonotic and has better performance, or is it like unigine and has half the performance?
          How about Serious Sam 3? Natural Selection 2? Brutal Legend? Killing Floor? Dungeon Defenders?

          Especially since sometimes developers don't test them and Michael ends up uncovering issues in his testing and raising some eyebrows. We really need testing on those titles.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by [Knuckles] View Post
            +1 I was going to ask the same. Michael has said in the past that he has had some issues benchmarking steam games, but we really need it, at least as a baseline. Does the source engine (half-life2 / portal / dota / cs / left4dead) compare to openarena/xonotic and has better performance, or is it like unigine and has half the performance?
            How about Serious Sam 3? Natural Selection 2? Brutal Legend? Killing Floor? Dungeon Defenders?

            Especially since sometimes developers don't test them and Michael ends up uncovering issues in his testing and raising some eyebrows. We really need testing on those titles.
            Not all of these propose reproducable benchmarking.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by wujj123456 View Post
              I just come here to put out one suggestion. Given that Steam is on Linux for a while, can we start using some games on Steam as benchmarks? Just as many Windows reviews do? That could both provide more useful information for the Linux gaming crowd, and foster grounds of improvement for real games that many people play. (I am not saying current benchmarks are useless, but there is definitely a disconnection between Windows reviews and Linux ones. Using common and popular games could significantly reduce this gap.)

              Then whenever someone doubts the usability of Linux as a gaming platform, we can simply point it to these benchmark: this is the performance you know in Windows, and Linux is better/same/slightly slower, etc.
              Read: http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...tem&px=MTQxMzY
              Michael Larabel
              http://www.michaellarabel.com/

              Comment


              • #8
                @Calinou

                That's incorrect. Every game with Unreal engine (Killing Floor uses a 2.5 variant) has a benchmark mode. Try:

                http://kanotix.com/files/fix/tmp/kf/...lling-floor.sh

                Or with your own demos:

                http://kanotix.com/files/fix/tmp/kf/...ing-floor.bash

                I dont have got DD installed and it crashed very often when i tried it, but if you could record demos it should work similar. Btw. it would work with an offline KF install as well (if you used it as trial before it still can be used for solo mode/offline).

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Kano View Post
                  @Calinou

                  That's incorrect. Every game with Unreal engine (Killing Floor uses a 2.5 variant) has a benchmark mode. Try:

                  http://kanotix.com/files/fix/tmp/kf/...lling-floor.sh

                  Or with your own demos:

                  http://kanotix.com/files/fix/tmp/kf/...ing-floor.bash

                  I dont have got DD installed and it crashed very often when i tried it, but if you could record demos it should work similar. Btw. it would work with an offline KF install as well (if you used it as trial before it still can be used for solo mode/offline).
                  That still relies upon Steam where the game could be updated without knowing and not for sure at the same version as others.
                  Michael Larabel
                  http://www.michaellarabel.com/

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                  • #10
                    So I see the issues you are putting forward. That's doesn't relieve the curiosity of your readers (including myself) to know how these games perform! I mean they don't have to be part of your regular regimine of game benchmarks, but I would like to see these games (including some other games that have been recently released on linux) be included in the more extensive reviews. You could include a disclaimer with benchmarks for those games.

                    k thnx bai.

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                    • #11
                      Any wins against Windows when it comes to power consumption?

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by guido12 View Post
                        Any wins against Windows when it comes to power consumption?
                        I am also definitely interested in the runtime and power consumption of this laptop.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Michael View Post
                          That still relies upon Steam where the game could be updated without knowing and not for sure at the same version as others.
                          True, and I agree with some of your points. Steam is a pain to move around across machines, even though you can actually just copy the steamapps folder and Steam is clever enough to figure out the minimal download required. However, just for benchmark, that's still huge amount of wasted data moving around.

                          Regarding auto updating, it will defeat your very stable baseline since you won't be able to compare the results a month old if there is a patch. However, it's same story if you upgrade your driver/xorg/kernel, etc. It really means that you will have to treat the game as a moving target, and make it part of the things you are benchmarking. Updates will significantly reduce the comparability of benchmark results across a long time, if there is any comparability at all, but that will be the games players actually play, at the time you publish those articles.

                          If a game is painfully slow after an auto-upgrade, it's a good thing if benchmarking reveals the regression. Or if a game becomes faster, it's good to know that things are improving. If L4D2's version 219 is significantly slower in kernel 3.12-rc1 with Nvidia driver 320.xx than version 210 with NV 319 in 3.10, it's obviously something the game/chip company or kernel devs could pay attention too. If just because L4D2 will auto-update and we don't benchmark them, these problems might just slip without notice. Whether they will pay attention is their problem, but it's always good if someone is raising the problem or even tracking it.

                          Btw, there are ways to tell the version. Some game needs to check .ini files, and others might have in-game commands. I agree 100% that if version check is in-game, this makes automation very hard to nearly impossible (unless there are command line options for that, and that might be the case).

                          I still think it will be informative to provide Steam game benchmarks even if they do not form stable baseline overtime. It will nevertheless reflect state-of-art in gaming world, and make readers, especially those Windows users considering trying out Linux gaming more connected.

                          This is just my two cents and thank you for your continuous Linux benchmarking effort. As the only website I know out there pushing Linux benchmarks, you definitely have an uphill battle trying to get the tools and workflow together.

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