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  • Intel Releases Linux Thermal Daemon

    Phoronix: Intel Releases Linux Thermal Daemon

    Intel has announced the release of an open-source Linux Thermal Daemon package for Linux. Intel's Linux Thermal Daemon is for monitoring and controlling platform temperatures...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTM2OTk

  • #2
    Just what I was looking for, for my ultrabook with only a single fan and an easily blocked vent haha

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    • #3
      That's interesting. Is it like PowerTop in that it's just developed by Intel, but works fine on AMD platforms as well?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by GreatEmerald View Post
        That's interesting. Is it like PowerTop in that it's just developed by Intel, but works fine on AMD platforms as well?
        It says it will use the Intel specific drivers when available, when it can't use those then it will use the standarized x86 registers and the generic cpufreq infrastructure. Last line of the quoted text in the article.

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        • #5
          The specific driver you mention is already there in 3.9

          Michael, i crave a bench against usal ondemand and performance governors
          pretty please?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Ericg View Post
            It says it will use the Intel specific drivers when available, when it can't use those then it will use the standarized x86 registers and the generic cpufreq infrastructure. Last line of the quoted text in the article.
            It doesn't really tell me anything. "latest cooling and P state drivers developed by Intel" does not necessarily mean Intel-specific. Although I didn't see a P-state listing in PowerTop on my AMD hardware, so I suppose it is Intel-specific? And I also have no clue what what the x86 register use means in this context.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by GreatEmerald View Post
              It doesn't really tell me anything. "latest cooling and P state drivers developed by Intel" does not necessarily mean Intel-specific. Although I didn't see a P-state listing in PowerTop on my AMD hardware, so I suppose it is Intel-specific? And I also have no clue what what the x86 register use means in this context.
              I'm assuming that Intel didn't develop drivers for AMD hardware, not really their style. So, yes, its Intel specific until AMD drivers are upstreamed and the daemon is patched to be aware of them.


              The register comment would imply that part of the x86 standard is defining a specific set of CPU registers that say "When this register is this, it means: go to xyz performance state." So somewhere there is a register, lets call it PowerLevel (i know its not) and when its set to 1, thats idle, 2 is low power, 3 is medium, 4 is high, and 5 is turbo. And this daemon can set specific registers to specific values to help control the temperature of the box.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by phoronix View Post
                Phoronix: Intel Releases Linux Thermal Daemon

                Intel has announced the release of an open-source Linux Thermal Daemon package for Linux. Intel's Linux Thermal Daemon is for monitoring and controlling platform temperatures...

                http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTM2OTk
                Intel, why are you summoning these daemons?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Kivada View Post
                  Intel, why are you summoning these daemons?

                  Interesting choice of a fire demon as a pun for a daemon that restricts heat.... more apt picture would have been an ice devil

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                  • #10
                    Quick question: why don't they just patch the current cpufreq subsystem ? Why reinvent the wheel ?

                    Last question: that daemon runs in user space ? How efficient is that ? do we really a daemon for something that can be done by the kernel ?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by wargames View Post
                      Quick question: why don't they just patch the current cpufreq subsystem ? Why reinvent the wheel ?

                      Last question: that daemon runs in user space ? How efficient is that ? do we really a daemon for something that can be done by the kernel ?
                      Why run it in kernel, if it can be run in userland? That's how all the power daemons worked so far (laptop-mode-tools, cpupower, fancontrol etc.), and the cpufreq kernel governors are just there to do one thing and one thing only - change the CPU frequency depending on the load. They don't detect temperatures and all that.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by wargames View Post
                        Quick question: why don't they just patch the current cpufreq subsystem ? Why reinvent the wheel ?

                        Last question: that daemon runs in user space ? How efficient is that ? do we really a daemon for something that can be done by the kernel ?
                        The Cpufreq subsystem handles controlling the CPU, via the governors which is CPU agnostic.. There's a reason the only options are: OnDemand, Performance, Powersave, and Conservative (and Userspace, but ive never seen that one get used o.O). This is about putting a watchdog daemon in place that says "I only ever want the internal temperature of the computer to get THIS hot." Lets call it 80degreess Celsius. If it ever hits 81 degrees or higher, then the daemon starts limiting the frequency of the CPU (and probably the GPU for intel's case) to keep things at the specified temperature. If we keep Cpufreq CPU agnostic-- as it should be-- it would probably way over-complicate things as far as abstracting away the differences in Intel vs AMD CPU's and drivers.

                        The upside to this, and not using just the cpufreq subsystem is we can use both. We can tell cpufreq "Use the ondemand governor." and then tell the Daemon "80 degrees max." So until the CPU starts hitting the high temps, you're getting the full performance of the CPU. And the daemon will only kick in if needed.

                        As far as why isn't it kernel space... I'm guessing the temperature reading is likely being handled by lm_sensors and then the daemon just continually checks the output of 'sensors', if that was done in kernel there'd be no way to guarantee lm_sensors existence, also everytime it'd go to check the temperature, wouldn't there be a context switch from kernel to userspace and back to kernel?

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Ericg View Post
                          There's a reason the only options are: OnDemand, Performance, Powersave, and Conservative (and Userspace, but ive never seen that one get used o.O).
                          It gets used all the time... from userland. It's just not set by default, because you need to have a userland daemon that would implement its own governor for it, and it's not available early during boot. One such a daemon is launched, it can manually set the governor to "userspace".

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by GreatEmerald View Post
                            It gets used all the time... from userland. It's just not set by default, because you need to have a userland daemon that would implement its own governor for it, and it's not available early during boot. One such a daemon is launched, it can manually set the governor to "userspace".
                            What i meant was i've never seen a program actually use the Userland daemon, nor have I ever seen it recommended, nor have I ever seen it being used by default on any distro. I'm sure there is SOME program out there (such as Launched) that uses it, ive just never seen it.

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                            • #15
                              Selling Hardware that don't gives the power that's described in the advertising sounds like a fraud to me.
                              And thermal control should be done outside of a maybe crashed OS.

                              What happens to your warranty if your device gets damaged because of a crashed OS ? Is your warranty
                              void because you are using a non certified OS with a given patch level and non certified applications ?

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