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Linux Gets IDed For Intel's "Harris Beach" Ultrabook

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  • #16
    Originally posted by skriticos View Post
    There is no named resolution like that. There are 720p and 1080p resolutions, that are specified as broadcast standards.
    1366 x 768 is only there because mutinying those results in an easy to handle pixel count for chip-sets.
    We would even fare much better with 1280x720 displays.

    http://hd1080i.blogspot.de/2006/12/1...-problems.html
    What are you talking about, "named" resolutions? There's no such thing.

    There are standards that most US content uses - those would be 480i, 480p, 720i, 720p, and 1080i/1080p. But there's nothing "special" about those though, other than that most content targets them so therefore most hardware does as well.

    The "names" don't even talk about horizontal resolution - 720p can be 1280x720, 960x720, 720x720, or even 20x720.

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    • #17
      Folks you missed point.

      Reference platform is NOT for You. You WONT get it.

      It's for other OEM's to get general idea what Intel talk about...

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      • #18
        I'd rather get a thicker plastic notebook that uses standard, off-the-shelf components that I can switch out in minutes like:

        - socketed mSATA drives
        - socketed RAM
        - socketed CPU
        - standard interface, non-soldered mPCIe WiFi card

        and lastly, easy access to the hardware that does not require dealing with non-standard screwheads or disassembling the whole machine and carefully pealing off some obnoxious EM shielding that seems to be placed more to obstruct self-disassembly than to actually protect the machine.

        Which, unfortunately, are qualities not present in any ultrabook today, tomorrow or in the future.
        Last edited by Sonadow; 04-17-2013, 08:04 AM.

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        • #19
          What I really want is a good replacement for my old 12" PowerBook G4, with the same form factor and build quality but better specs.
          What is it with these widescreen things?

          So my perfect laptop would have:
          - 12" 1440x1080 (4:3) screen, bright and non-glossy.
          - 'Traditional' laptop keyboard (I hate chiclet ones), with plenty of travel and ideally backlighting.
          - Big, responsive trackpad. Not too slippery, those glass ones are horrible.
          - i7, separate GPU. Both replaceable.
          - Optical drive, 2.5" SATA drive, removable RAM up to 16GB, mPCIe.
          - 3G and wifi, GbE, DisplayPort/HDMI and DVI-I out
          - At least four USB ports (some USB3) not all on the same side, eSATA, FireWire, perhaps Thunderbolt
          - Really big battery. I don't mind it being about an inch thick if I can use it for 8-10 hours straight.
          - The ability to swap the optical drive out for even more battery (yes, I love my PB1400)
          - A really solid metal case, with plenty of internal bracing and some shock-absorption.

          Apple used to make some really well-built, solid laptops - my PB190(!), PB1400 and G4 are all still working, despite the former being 20 years old and the latter having been dropped a dozen times and taken all over the country by bike. I'd never by a Macbook though - definitely style over substance (just look at those glass trackpads and glossy screens...)

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          • #20
            Originally posted by przemoli View Post
            Folks you missed point.

            Reference platform is NOT for You. You WONT get it.

            It's for other OEM's to get general idea what Intel talk about...

            hey hey hey... we can dream lol

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