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Intel Driver Integrates BRW Assembler

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  • Intel Driver Integrates BRW Assembler

    Phoronix: Intel Driver Integrates BRW Assembler

    The xf86-video-intel driver has picked up thousands of lines of new code today with the integration of a BRW assembler in order to compile shader programs on the fly and to remove inefficiencies and mistakes from current Intel shaders...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTE0OTc

  • #2
    And that's the way the cookie crumbles, AMD

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    • #3
      One word: Whoa!

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      • #4
        Man, I'm just in awe of the amazing progress Intel is making. Say what you want, their drivers are improving at breakneck speeds by the day! This is awesome!

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        • #5
          ...with BRW being an abbreviation for what, exactly?

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          • #6
            Michael doesn't know and in his rush to push out a half finished story didn't bother to find out or for that matter proof read his article

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Zorael View Post
              ...with BRW being an abbreviation for what, exactly?
              "Broadwater"---the codename for the original Gen4 graphics found in the G965 chipset (also called GMA X3000). Broadwater was Intel's first GPU to support a fully programmable shader pipeline. All of the later systems are based on this design. That's also why the 3D driver is called i965.
              Free Software Developer .:. Mesa and Xorg
              Opinions expressed in these forum posts are my own.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Kayden View Post
                "Broadwater"---the codename for the original Gen4 graphics found in the G965 chipset (also called GMA X3000). Broadwater was Intel's first GPU to support a fully programmable shader pipeline. All of the later systems are based on this design. That's also why the 3D driver is called i965.
                Thanks for the confirmation. I was scanning the source to try to figure it out, and figured it was an abbreviation of a codename for a prior chipset given the sections which followed this pattern:
                Code:
                if (p->gen >= 70) {
                 //do something
                } else if (p->gen >= 60) {
                 //do something else
                } else {
                 //do something with BRW in the name 
                }
                So, a new assembler for some legacy intel chipsets that helps to work around poorly written shaders and also when using the SNA architecture?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Kayden View Post
                  "Broadwater"---the codename for the original Gen4 graphics found in the G965 chipset (also called GMA X3000). Broadwater was Intel's first GPU to support a fully programmable shader pipeline. All of the later systems are based on this design. That's also why the 3D driver is called i965.
                  Thanks. I was wondering about that too

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by bridgman View Post
                    Thanks. I was wondering about that too
                    The only other possibility that I had come across was Broadwell, and I figured it was a bit early to have code ready for that one (it's what's coming after Haswell). Also, the code that I was reading didn't seem to agree with that possibility.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Veerappan View Post
                      The only other possibility that I had come across was Broadwell, and I figured it was a bit early to have code ready for that one (it's what's coming after Haswell). Also, the code that I was reading didn't seem to agree with that possibility.
                      Yeah, Broadwater vs. Broadwell is frustratingly similar. Especially when reading the abbreviations (BW/BRW vs. BDW/BWL).
                      Free Software Developer .:. Mesa and Xorg
                      Opinions expressed in these forum posts are my own.

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                      • #12
                        So, for someone who doesn't understand much of the GPU mumbo-jumbo this seems weird. Isn't SNA a means of 2D acceleration and aren't shaders related to 3D operations or something? Why are they in the same boat here?

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by devius View Post
                          So, for someone who doesn't understand much of the GPU mumbo-jumbo this seems weird. Isn't SNA a means of 2D acceleration and aren't shaders related to 3D operations or something? Why are they in the same boat here?
                          All of the 2D acceleration is done using the GPU's 3D pipeline. There isn't really 2D-specific hardware these days.
                          Free Software Developer .:. Mesa and Xorg
                          Opinions expressed in these forum posts are my own.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            So this shader assembler is only here to optimize 2D operations?

                            I already fail to see the point of accelerating perfectly fine 2D operations… I hope it will benefit real 3D stuff (games).

                            (PS: yet another article that doesn’t explain anything.)

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Intel Driver Integrates BRW Assembler

                              The xf86-video-intel driver has picked up thousands of lines of new code today with the integration of a BRW assembler in order to compile shader programs on the fly and to remove inefficiencies and mistakes from current Intel shaders

                              Comment

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