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  • How Hardware Companies Determine Their Linux Base

    Phoronix: How Hardware Companies Determine Their Linux Base

    Landing in the Phoronix e-mail inbox last night was a question by a reader asking how hardware vendors determine the operating systems used by their customers and their respective market-share since there isn't anything to "phone home" and report usage statistics. In other words, this reader had just purchased four desktop processors and he was wondering how to inform AMD that he's a Linux user. This is in hopes of going towards their Linux tally and eventually increasing their Linux level of support...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=OTM4MQ

  • #2
    How about adding a feature directly in kernel that send to a central common database a count.
    Each running kernel would therefore send his count and we would know within a month how many running kernel around the world.

    Ok, this is utopia because :
    older kernel wouldn't have this option
    what information exactly sending : count of processors ? uptime ? how many times is it used ? is it a server or a desktop ?
    Last problem, and worst of all : who will ever let such a feature be included in the kernel ? I guess no-one. It's linux. Not Apple, Microsoft or Google !


    But sometimes Big Brother would help...

    Comment


    • #3
      Isn't this what all these surveys we're asked to fill out are for?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Fixxer_Linux View Post
        How about adding a feature directly in kernel that send to a central common database a count.
        Each running kernel would therefore send his count and we would know within a month how many running kernel around the world.
        Except that doesn't mean anything.

        Nobody gives two shits about how many Linux machines there are in use. The real question is: how many people are going to _pay money_ for improved support by _buying new hardware_.

        You've got a Linux machine with an NVIDIA GPU in it now. Nobody cares. Unless you're saying that you'll go out and buy a new GTX 560 if NVIDIA releases FOSS drivers, you are entirely irrelevant in every possible way to NVIDIA.

        So the question is not "how many people run Linux." The question is "how many people will buy new video cards if and only if Linux support is improved." Note that that is entirely different than "how many people will buy a new card for their Linux machine eventually no matter what."

        Comment


        • #5
          SMOLT

          Originally posted by Fixxer_Linux View Post
          How about adding a feature directly in kernel that send to a central common database a count.
          Each running kernel would therefore send his count and we would know within a month how many running kernel around the world.

          Ok, this is utopia because :
          older kernel wouldn't have this option
          what information exactly sending : count of processors ? uptime ? how many times is it used ? is it a server or a desktop ?
          Last problem, and worst of all : who will ever let such a feature be included in the kernel ? I guess no-one. It's linux. Not Apple, Microsoft or Google !


          But sometimes Big Brother would help...
          SMOLT partially achieves that I think.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by elanthis View Post
            Except that doesn't mean anything.

            Nobody gives two shits about how many Linux machines there are in use. The real question is: how many people are going to _pay money_ for improved support by _buying new hardware_.

            You've got a Linux machine with an NVIDIA GPU in it now. Nobody cares. Unless you're saying that you'll go out and buy a new GTX 560 if NVIDIA releases FOSS drivers, you are entirely irrelevant in every possible way to NVIDIA.

            So the question is not "how many people run Linux." The question is "how many people will buy new video cards if and only if Linux support is improved." Note that that is entirely different than "how many people will buy a new card for their Linux machine eventually no matter what."
            How's that different from Windows?

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by edvin View Post
              SMOLT partially achieves that I think.
              Can't see how. It's about packages used, not hardware.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by RealNC View Post
                Can't see how. It's about packages used, not hardware.
                Smolt also reports the hardware present in the system. (In a very poor manner however).

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Fixxer_Linux View Post
                  How about adding a feature directly in kernel that send to a central common database a count.
                  Each running kernel would therefore send his count and we would know within a month how many running kernel around the world.
                  At most you'd only want to send the LSHW data, not much they can do with that but tell what you're running with no personal information revealed.

                  Originally posted by elanthis View Post
                  Nobody gives two shits about how many Linux machines there are in use. The real question is: how many people are going to _pay money_ for improved support by _buying new hardware_.

                  You've got a Linux machine with an NVIDIA GPU in it now. Nobody cares. Unless you're saying that you'll go out and buy a new GTX 560 if NVIDIA releases FOSS drivers, you are entirely irrelevant in every possible way to NVIDIA.
                  No, the only way to get Nvidia to notice is to beat them over the head by purchasing AMD hardware because on their lack of OSS support. Don't get distracted by the VDPAU cookie.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Kivada View Post
                    No, the only way to get Nvidia to notice is to beat them over the head by purchasing AMD hardware because on their lack of OSS support. Don't get distracted by the VDPAU cookie.
                    Can you show me one such example where that has worked?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Kivada View Post
                      No, the only way to get Nvidia to notice is to beat them over the head by purchasing AMD hardware because on their lack of OSS support. Don't get distracted by the VDPAU cookie.
                      Get NVidia to notice what exactly? Their drivers are top notch. If someone needs to notice, it's AMD with their fglrx, not NVidia.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Kivada View Post
                        No, the only way to get Nvidia to notice is to beat them over the head by purchasing AMD hardware because on their lack of OSS support. Don't get distracted by the VDPAU cookie.
                        Would not make a difference, main reason why nvidia makes linux drivers are professional markets(quadro, tesla. For them drivers have to work). To making drivers for geforces too is then easy for them.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          some ideas:
                          you could enable smolt or popcon (debian and ubuntu). and sign up at linuxcounter. those help people get estimates of number of linux users.

                          buy computers from vendors that preinstall linux. http://nakedcomputers.org/ has a fairly big list. when these vendors do large orders from the manufactures they will talk to them about compatibility and drivers.

                          fill in those registration card that you get with hardware.

                          email everyone in the supply chain and ask them if a device supports linux. they may not know, or just say 'we dont support linux', but if enough people do it then they may look into it. look at how successful the organic and fairtrade food movements are.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            counter.li.org - shame it's not used more

                            http://counter.li.org/

                            I also allowed opensuse to install SMOLT on my computers.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Probably wouldn't have much effect, but I just had an idea for a UA string:

                              "<BROWSER> <OS> (<KERNEL> <KVERSION>) [ARCH]"
                              e.g.: "Chrome Fedora (Linux 2.6.38)", or "Firefox 4 / Fedora (Linux 2.6.38) x86_64"

                              Short, informative, and not verbose. ;-)

                              Comment

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