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Will Intel's Sandy Bridge & P67 Play Well With Linux?

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  • Will Intel's Sandy Bridge & P67 Play Well With Linux?

    Phoronix: Will Intel's Sandy Bridge & P67 Play Well With Linux?

    Next week Intel is set to roll out their much-anticipated "Sandy Bridge" CPUs during the 2011 Consumer Electronics Show. With these 32nm, LGA-1155 next-generation Intel Core processors will also come the Intel P67 Chipset on a whole selection of new motherboards at launch like the ECS P67H2-A2 and ASRock P67 Pro3. How well though will Intel's newest hardware play with Linux?

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=15579

  • #2
    The Intel Sandy Bridge support though should be all ironed out with a pleasant "out of the box" experience by the time of Ubuntu 11.04, Fedora 14, and other Q2'2011 Linux distributions are released.
    I think you mean Fedora 15.

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    • #3
      One
      Two
      Three
      Four

      One could have asked if Linux really supports currently available Intel graphics solution. And this depresses me. One active developer? Really? WTF?? Intel earns billions of dollars yearly and has just just one developer? WTF?

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      • #4
        Damn......

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        • #5
          Most of the changes are in the kernel and mesa. xf86-video-intel only does 2d acceleration and interface to X, basically.

          3d is in Mesa and in the kernel, modesetting is in the kernel, and Intel is doing quite a bit of work on those.

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          • #6
            Intel's current high-end chipsets like the Intel X58, P55, and P58. On the motherboard side, the only issues you may experience are with the thermal/voltage/fan sensors not working with LM_Sensors and the kernel drivers at this point, but that is not a big issue to most consumers and the state of the hardware sensor support across most motherboards on Linux is still relatively sad.
            wtf?

            In many years I never encountered a board where the sensor chip was not supported.

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            • #7
              I bet the CPU part is going to work very well on Linux (even better than on Windows, in the long-term), but the graphics perfomance (on both Windows and Linux OS) will be as good as usual from Intel ...
              So, I think I'll still prefer to use a system with a fast processor (these Intel ones I think they won't let you down) and a discrete ATI/nVidia graphics card...

              Cheers

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              • #8
                Originally posted by energyman View Post
                wtf?

                In many years I never encountered a board where the sensor chip was not supported.
                Ran across quite a few over the years. Usually they eventually get implemented some time after introduction.

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                • #9
                  the worst I ever had to do was to add an identifier to a header file... the winbond or it chips are not so different at all...

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by energyman View Post
                    the worst I ever had to do was to add an identifier to a header file... the winbond or it chips are not so different at all...
                    Well just for example some motherboards like certain Asus motherboards utilize a virtual sensor device (ATK0110) support for it took quite a while.

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                    • #11
                      a) that was in ages ago.
                      b) that 'virtual device' is just a known chip adressed differently. You can even access it without that driver.

                      I have such a board

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by energyman View Post
                        a) that was in ages ago.
                        b) that 'virtual device' is just a known chip adressed differently. You can even access it without that driver.

                        I have such a board

                        a) Not really ages ago, the patch was submitted to lmsensors late 2009 and the device has been around for the better part of 4 years. b) the "virtual device" handles more then just sensor support and also hooks into the ACPI. It also handles items like fan speed, clock adjustments, voltage adjustments, etc. Before the patch was introduced you would get conflicting addresses between the two "devices" as they were both trying to address the same locations.

                        I have 6 such boards of different models with this device.

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                        • #13
                          Only the new H67 chipset will support Intel's on-die graphics, the P67 is used with a discrete graphics card.

                          I'm hoping for an Asus (or other high quality) microATX H67 board I can build a new Linux workstation around.

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                          • #14
                            Yes, only H and Q boards have got the needed connectors. P does not. When you want to use every game you will most likely need a dedicated card, for some simples ones onboard might be enough. But intel Linux drivers have been always slower than the Win drivers for games, so more interesting will be libva support - and i want to see vc1 too... When you look at the libva git log you will see h264+mpeg2 for sandy bridge already:

                            http://cgit.freedesktop.org/libva/log/

                            I did not test my i5-680 lately, if somebody has got one H5 board too much send it to me... But when i tested it vlc was not able to use DXVA2 correctly - libva was better, but i only tested hd samples.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Kano View Post
                              Yes, only H and Q boards have got the needed connectors. P does not. When you want to use every game you will most likely need a dedicated card, for some simples ones onboard might be enough. But intel Linux drivers have been always slower than the Win drivers for games, so more interesting will be libva support - and i want to see vc1 too... When you look at the libva git log you will see h264+mpeg2 for sandy bridge already:

                              http://cgit.freedesktop.org/libva/log/

                              I did not test my i5-680 lately, if somebody has got one H5 board too much send it to me... But when i tested it vlc was not able to use DXVA2 correctly - libva was better, but i only tested hd samples.
                              I don't know, the benchmarks from Anandtech a couple of months back showed some pretty serious improvement on the integrated graphics side. It's not like there's a lot of high end games for our linux boxes which require the latest and greatest discrete solutions. My 9800GT still chews through almost anything I throw at it, most of the time even stuff running under wine.

                              I am very interested in the benchmarks under linux. I'm pretty positive I'll be upgrading my HTPC (from an X2 @ 2,4 ghz/integrated gf7050) using one of these processors, depending on how well-supported they are shortly after launch. I'm guessing I'm not alone in those plans.

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