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Intel & The Shortcomings Of Gallium3D

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  • #16
    Originally posted by clavko View Post
    I say, sir, you're obviously not living in the same world the rest of us do. Governments and large corporations almost exclusively use Microsoft software for their desktop workstations. Very few would have the time and resources to go through the source code for all of their applications and software layers.
    I believe many governments have a special deal with Microsoft where they can review the code to make sure that there aren't any special NSA "additions" that they might be concerned about.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by smitty3268 View Post
      I believe many governments have a special deal with Microsoft where they can review the code to make sure that there aren't any special NSA "additions" that they might be concerned about.
      Yes, that's true - those were the "big customers" i was refering to. I imagine that not all of the windows source code is available, though - perhaps some of the more critical 'chunks'. Although someone may call that 'opensource', the reality is that the code is definitely owned by MS, the reviewers are among the carefully chosen few and they can't (or have no rights) to improve on the code as they see fit.

      It's a long, long way from that kind of "opensource" to foss.
      Or else RMS wouldn't have to devise GPL, don't you agree

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      • #18
        Originally posted by clavko View Post
        I say, sir, you're obviously not living in the same world the rest of us do. Governments and large corporations almost exclusively use Microsoft software for their desktop workstations. Very few would have the time and resources to go through the source code for all of their applications and software layers.

        Linux will remain where it is now... until we move to the cloud.
        And then it won't matter whether it's safe - your data is already... online
        Cloud's not going to happen. You can want it to. You can try to force it but you're going to get revolt after revolt after revolt.

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        • #19
          What good is having access to windows source code if you can't (at least) compile it and install it?

          If you can't verify that the binaries that you've installed on your system are the result of the actual code that you review then it's useless.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by clavko View Post
            I say, sir, you're obviously not living in the same world the rest of us do. Governments and large corporations almost exclusively use Microsoft software for their desktop workstations. Very few would have the time and resources to go through the source code for all of their applications and software layers.

            Opensource is not inherently more secure - each distro has security announcements. It's true that many eyes can see more, but in the end, most of the distro's are binary precompiled with some patches definitely not originating from software creators. Security will cost you, whether you use opensource or not. Big customers will sometime receive source overview of the critical (security-wise) parts of the code. But it will be under NDA. It will be for someone's eyes only. It will not be for everyone. And it most certainly won't be free.

            Linux will remain where it is now... until we move to the cloud.
            And then it won't matter whether it's safe - your data is already... online
            Ugh, first off open source IS more secure because you can't hide secrets as easily as you can with closed, and the difference between open and closed is your ability to have control over it as well as its sustainability due to easy reusability and other things. No, some governments and companies and institutions and individuals will not review the entire codebase. So what? They have the freedom to do so if they wanted to is the important part without any stupid NDAs or back room deals. The reason some governments still use Microsoft software is because they're a) bought out, and have sold out their taxpayers, and b) it was the defacto desktop experience for a while and largely still is unfortunately, but has NO reason for continuing. ANY and ALL problems with ANY open source software that a government might wish to use but needed feature X is vastly outweighed by the savings that would occur which could easily be put into developing said feature X for a fraction of the cost.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Yfrwlf View Post
              Ugh, first off open source IS more secure because you can't hide secrets as easily as you can with closed, and the difference between open and closed is your ability to have control over it as well as its sustainability due to easy reusability and other things.
              My thoughts were related towards system implementations and TCO, not open/closed per se. I'd say that improper system implementation, not applying security patches and updates, inadequate or missing security policies - all those are most often the culprit of a vulnerable system, rather than security flaws in the software. The costs of carefully designing and implementing security system in a corporation far outweights the cost of the software itself, whether it's opensource or not. It's the human factor. Even intelligence agencies around the globe resort to obtaining passwords through keyloggers rather than breaking the unbreakable (AES et. alt.)

              Originally posted by Yfrwlf
              The reason some governments still use Microsoft software is because they're a) bought out, and have sold out their taxpayers, and b) it was the defacto desktop experience for a while and largely still is unfortunately, but has NO reason for continuing.
              Ofcourse they have. There's an entire robust ecosystem of apps built around Windows. For a problem XY you'll find 15 solutions for Windows platform and 2 solutions for Unix/Linux. One of those might not work with the kernel>=2.6.28 or KDE>=3. It's the difference between iPhone OS and Android/Meego/Moblin - iPhone OS delivers, and delivers fast. And when you're on a deadline schedule, you'll want that. It's often much, much cheaper to buy a licence than code it yourself - developers are more expensive than hardware, therefore, Java programming

              Mind you, I'm NOT bash#-ing the whole opensource idea here. But as soon we got rid of all illusions and accept our current position in the foodchain the sooner we'll move ahead. KDE people got it. Ubuntu got it. Apache got it. The rest will follow... or die... alone... in the snow

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              • #22
                Originally posted by MostAwesomeDude View Post
                Yo man, I respect you, and I'mma let you finish, but r300-gallium is totally a working driver, and it spins glxgears faster than the old r300 driver. Just wanted to give that little shout-out.
                Yo man, that's classic bro! I mean... ABOVE classic, ha ha... Know what I'm sayin'?

                AMD devs are bringing it home

                Totally...



                --

                Hhahaa WTF

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by clavko View Post
                  Mind you, I'm NOT bash#-ing the whole opensource idea here. But as soon we got rid of all illusions and accept our current position in the food chain the sooner we'll move ahead. KDE people got it. Ubuntu got it. Apache got it. The rest will follow... or die... alone... in the snow
                  And then the ice weasels come...

                  Seriously. Nice to see adults in the mix.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by clavko View Post
                    I get your point, but it's somewhat flawed. Indeed, the world does not revolve around Linux (at least not for the time being).
                    The world resolves arout money. Money resolves around the economy. The economy resolves around the stock market. Stock markets run Linux (mostly or are migrating.

                    The world also resolved around communication. Communication resolves around the internet and phones. Currently most ISP's and websites are Linux based. The same goes largely for phones.

                    When at home, people watch an awful lot of TV. TV set top boxes mostly run Linux.

                    Health resolves around hospitals. Hospitals almost all use Linux for their servers...

                    Dude if all Linux based apparatus would crash right now; the world would collapse.

                    I think it is pretty safe to asume that the world is in fact spinning around Linux

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Hephasteus View Post
                      Cloud's not going to happen. You can want it to. You can try to force it but you're going to get revolt after revolt after revolt.
                      iPad. People'll give up their rights if the pied piper's tune is good enough.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by V!NCENT View Post
                        I think it is pretty safe to asume that the world is in fact spinning around Linux
                        Just not the desktop

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by V!NCENT View Post
                          Stock markets run Linux... Currently most ISP's and websites are Linux based. The same goes largely for phones... TV set top boxes mostly run Linux... Hospitals almost all use Linux for their servers...

                          I think it is pretty safe to asume that the world is in fact spinning around Linux
                          True, true... I think my comment was related to a notion that web technologies would somehow "wait" for linux hardware video accelleration to catch up. No go. If 90%+ of your market (consumers) runs a platform that supports VA, you're good to go. If you can push it today rather than tommorow, the better... In that sense, the world does not revolve around linux.

                          Linux has many strong points, and I am just as excited as you over all those market breakthroughs. It's a sign of a mature, yet extremely flexible platform. In fact, it's even that good, that we don't have to resort to "M$ is evil" tactics anymore just to feel good.

                          However, mind you, all of the platforms you mentioned do come bundled with a bit of a financial "pain" inflicted to your wallet, i.e. they're not free as a beer. And this is a good thing - you can make money with linux. And it brings enhanced or new stuff back in - WebKit, QT, OpenGL...

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                          • #28
                            System implementations and TCO in the open source world are taken into consideration depending on the type of ownership, whether the ownerbe able to handle higher TCO or not.

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                            • #29
                              Recently I tried out an open source search platform, Solr (http://www.lucidimagination.com/Down...eference-Guide ) , which exhibits advanced searching & indexing techniques.I don't think in this case , TCO factor should make much of a difference.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by clavko View Post
                                Linux has many strong points, and I am just as excited as you over all those market breakthroughs. It's a sign of a mature, yet extremely flexible platform. In fact, it's even that good, that we don't have to resort to "M$ is evil" tactics anymore just to feel good.
                                Not going to even bother replying to the rest, too uninterested, but I will say that M$ is evil. Many large monopolistic corporations are, not just them. They have no morals, and they pretty much steal billions of dollars of everyones taxes around the world. That's not why I use Linux, but it's very easy and logical to see why someone might do so simply to get away from Microsoft and Windows, and that's perfectly legitimate for those who switch for that reason, so make sure you don't bash them for that.

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