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  • Originally posted by bridgman View Post
    It's a good thing most companies require strong passwords these days, so users write their passwords down on yellow sticky notes or leave them in clear-text files on the PC.
    Btw, I expect you are aware of the fact that if there is indeed even a fraction of organized crime behind piracy like media industry claims, someone will eventually reverse-engineer the cards no matter how well the information is guarded.

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    • Originally posted by nanonyme View Post
      Btw, I expect you are aware of the fact that if there is indeed even a fraction of organized crime behind piracy like media industry claims, someone will eventually reverse-engineer the cards no matter how well the information is guarded.
      I agree completely. If we thought that cracking the graphics card DRM implementation was a viable approach for content piracy we probably would not have been able to provide much support for open source driver development in the first place. If you want to pirate protected media content there are easier ways to do it.

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      • Originally posted by nanonyme View Post
        Oh, cool. So it would take only 48247532784267608970568097787748983353656788171230 145158795634555590179630324741547659478604 years to crack an alphanumeric password with spaces with length 60 by bruteforce methods by your calculations with the grid you visioned. You, sir, are a genious.
        But! AES has known flaws....

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        • Originally posted by bridgman View Post
          It's a good thing most companies require strong passwords these days, so users write their passwords down on yellow sticky notes or leave them in clear-text files on the PC.
          LOL :-) thats a nice idear.. to get a blueray key.

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          • Hey guys, for cracking a code for accessing a system, the best way ever made is still to grab a gun and respectfully ask for the password !


            I'm kiding, but not so much. Kevin MITNICK said that the best way ever made was simply to phone and simply ask the password, letting the user believe that it's an IT support call and the password must be confirmed for checking purposes (or any other story that seems true to the employee)...

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