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AMD APU On Linux: Gallium3D Can Be 80%+ As Fast As Catalyst

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  • #51
    Hmm, it's good to see the progress. But apparently you need really recent code. On the SuSE installation (just got to openSuSE 13.1) I am supervising there are still problems with the free driver stack and an A6 5400K. Glitches and graphic deformations, garbage from time to time on the screen. And the SW components aren't that old. (Kernel 3.11.something, Mesa 9.2.2 and so on). (I should have installed Gentoo on it anyway, but then installation takes much longer and I can't come over to that box so often for regular syncing and updating.) Fglrx worked "fine" besides giving me a black screen on any real console (ctrl-alt-Fx). It is a bit sad since I had hoped for 8 months since the last SuSE that I could use the free driver stack now. But no, it is still haunted by bugs.

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    • #52
      Just in case you didn't know, there's an open bug for a year now, only on Black Editions, and only on China-assembled ones:
      https://bugs.freedesktop.org/show_bug.cgi?id=60389

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      • #53
        It's diffused in Germany and ass. in Malaysia but the bug looks interesting. These desktop artifacts are quite a nuisance.
        Thanks for the link.

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        • #54
          I would have prefered no overclocking.

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          • #55
            Originally posted by stqn View Post
            I would have prefered no overclocking.
            Why? Overclocking is pretty trivial these days if you don't have crippled Dell/HP/Acer/Lenovo etc. hardware.

            The top end GPUs are now overclocking themselves based on thermals. The cooler you can keep the GPU the higher it'll push itself.

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            • #56
              Originally posted by Kivada View Post
              Why? Overclocking is pretty trivial these days if you don't have crippled Dell/HP/Acer/Lenovo etc. hardware.

              The top end GPUs are now overclocking themselves based on thermals. The cooler you can keep the GPU the higher it'll push itself.
              - As you said, it may not be possible on all hardware.
              - Itís not representative of the out-of-the-box performance of the hardware that most users will experiment.
              - It may require a different cooling solution than the one provided by AMD in order to keep the noise down (though arguably the same can be said of my non-overclocked i3Ö)
              - Different processors will (AFAIK) have different overclocking possibilities, so itís not certain that everyone will be able to overclock this processor to 4.7*GHz.
              - Overclocking will cause the processor to consume more power and the fan to spin faster which I donít like; I prefer to undervolt my processors and keep them at their normal frequency.

              Now if GPUs are overclocking themselves out of the box, then maybe itís what should be benchmarkedÖ But the results will change according to the case ventilation and ambiant temperature and length of the testÖ fun.

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              • #57
                Originally posted by stqn View Post
                Now if GPUs are overclocking themselves out of the box, then maybe it’s what should be benchmarked… But the results will change according to the case ventilation and ambiant temperature and length of the test… fun.
                Both current CPUs and GPUs do it (the "turbo" mode). You're also correct that it affects benchmarking results, and many sites wondered what to do with that.

                Some planned to only benchmark with that disabled; but that has two problems 1) not all cards let you disable it 2) then it's not what most users will see.

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