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Uninstalling Catalyst/fglrx leaves behind a broken system

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  • #16
    Originally posted by grege View Post
    Straight from the read me ...

    Launch the Terminal Application/Window and navigate to the /usr/share/fglrx folder.
    With super user permissions, enter the command "sh./fglrx-uninstall.sh"

    The script will usually restore all the correct mesa files and symlinks.
    I have yet to see their uninstaller script do anything but break Mesa and possibly stop X from loading because it didn't remove part of the Catalyst bundle.

    Their official installer is nasty shit, seriously. Don't use it. (OK, it is your system, but don't say nobody warned you.) If you feel comfortable poking around figuring out why X won't load, use their installer. If you want it packaged in a semi-sane manner that probably won't destroy your system* use the distribution specific packages.

    (*This isn't to say that FGLRX won't randomly lock up your system forcing you to hold in the power button, but that's on a bad month, like this month's 11.9 release. Usually.)

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    • #17
      Thats correct, do not use the nvidia install on ubuntu >= 10.04. that introduced the gl_conf alternatives switching and will stop working correctly then. it works fine with debian squeeze however.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by DaemonFC View Post
        I have yet to see their uninstaller script do anything but break Mesa and possibly stop X from loading because it didn't remove part of the Catalyst bundle.

        Their official installer is nasty shit, seriously. Don't use it. (OK, it is your system, but don't say nobody warned you.) If you feel comfortable poking around figuring out why X won't load, use their installer. If you want it packaged in a semi-sane manner that probably won't destroy your system* use the distribution specific packages.

        (*This isn't to say that FGLRX won't randomly lock up your system forcing you to hold in the power button, but that's on a bad month, like this month's 11.9 release. Usually.)
        I have used the uninstaller successfully many times over the years, more often on Debian systems. With Ubuntu just uninstalling through Synaptic is usually enough. The main thing is to get rid of the symlinks it creates. Occasionally I have had to manually remove xorg.conf and the fglrx entry in /etc/modules.d

        I always run "sudo dpkg-reconfigure -phigh xserver-xorg" when I am finished to ensure the system is back to default. Then when back to a desktop open a term and run xvinfo and glxinfo to make sure the Mesa driver is working. The mesa-utils package must be installed to provide glxinfo.

        I do agree that removing fglrx is often a lot more messy than removing nvidia.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by grege View Post
          I have used the uninstaller successfully many times over the years, more often on Debian systems. With Ubuntu just uninstalling through Synaptic is usually enough. The main thing is to get rid of the symlinks it creates. Occasionally I have had to manually remove xorg.conf and the fglrx entry in /etc/modules.d

          I always run "sudo dpkg-reconfigure -phigh xserver-xorg" when I am finished to ensure the system is back to default. Then when back to a desktop open a term and run xvinfo and glxinfo to make sure the Mesa driver is working. The mesa-utils package must be installed to provide glxinfo.

          I do agree that removing fglrx is often a lot more messy than removing nvidia.
          In all fairness, I think AMD and Nvidia should include some kind of warning that using their installer, your distribution's package management will have no way of knowing about or dealing with FGLRX/nvidia being installed and that it's very likely to break the next time you update your system.

          Letting users easily install it from their official installer with no warning at all just contributes to this whole "ZOMG, I broke everything, Linux sucks" problem caused by their proprietary drivers. Not that they care. (AMD's download page = radeon_linux.aspx)

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          • #20
            Originally posted by grege View Post
            I have used the uninstaller successfully many times over the years, more often on Debian systems. With Ubuntu just uninstalling through Synaptic is usually enough. The main thing is to get rid of the symlinks it creates. Occasionally I have had to manually remove xorg.conf and the fglrx entry in /etc/modules.d

            I always run "sudo dpkg-reconfigure -phigh xserver-xorg" when I am finished to ensure the system is back to default. Then when back to a desktop open a term and run xvinfo and glxinfo to make sure the Mesa driver is working. The mesa-utils package must be installed to provide glxinfo.

            I do agree that removing fglrx is often a lot more messy than removing nvidia.

            I agree with grege on this, I have also used the AMD's uninstaller many times without problems. Although one thing needs to be kept in mind, when ever one is working outside the package management system one does need to be switched on.
            I normaly use AMD's binary blob directly to install, I have used Kano's script and it works well but it does need a GOOD internet connection and this is something I do not (and likely never will) have. So this restricts how I can do things.

            Note: I have not used FGLRX now for at least 6 months as I find the OS driver superior for the type of 3D develpment work I do.

            Blacksmith

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            • #21
              you can dl the version you want to install whereever you want and put it in /usr/src. when the installer follows the "normal" naming scheme you can specify any version with -v XXX option. you can use that for unreleased drivers as well that way.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Kano View Post
                you can dl the version you want to install whereever you want and put it in /usr/src. when the installer follows the "normal" naming scheme you can specify any version with -v XXX option. you can use that for unreleased drivers as well that way.
                Thanks for your reply, I went through your script to see the way it worked, the problem is my transfer rate here is only 1000 to 1500 bytes/sec. The script downloads and installs a number of packages in order to create the correct deb file to install. This download took over 3 hours then it failed. it took two attempts (not good !!!!!) at this to get FGLRX installed. The script worked great once one figured out how to use it but the download time is just to long for me. Note, I can download the AMD package at the internet cafe in town, the transfer rate there is in the order 150 kilobytes per sec, unfortunately thats in town and I live in a remote area where the population is very low.

                Another point to keep in mind is I have been using Linux since kernel 0.96d, way back in 1993. Playing around in Linux is no problems these days and holds no fears for me,
                can still be be a pain though sometimes,

                "been there and done that, got the t shirt to prove it"

                Blacksmith

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                • #23
                  Only times I've had issues removing/upgrading fglrx in the past 3 years and a half I've been using it is when openSUSE still had saX (or was it Sax... SaX... yeah whatever...).
                  Since it kicked the bucket, I've had to shut down X before running the installation script. That's it.
                  Never used any additional repository nor extra script.

                  Code:
                  # cd /usr/share/ati
                  # ./fglrx-uninstall.sh (now ./amd-uninstall.sh)
                  *reboot*
                  Ctrl-Alt-F1, log in
                  # init 3
                  # cd /wherever/I/saved/the/binary/
                  # sh ati-[Tab]
                  [Yes] [Yes] [Yes] [Ok] yada yada...
                  # rm /etc/ati/amdpcsdb
                  *reboot*
                  ...
                  Profit!
                  I suggest people having issues with fglrx rethink their troubleshooting workflow.
                  Last edited by PsynoKhi0; 10-24-2011, 08:01 AM.

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                  • #24
                    i install kubuntu 11.10 again over the old system to rip out the catalyst... but the catalyst is still there...
                    the kubuntu 11.10 installation automatic install the catalyst if the old install do have the catalyst..

                    Catalyst =cyborg/borg attacking my system.

                    Catalyst: "You will be assimilated. Resistance is futile. "
                    Catalyst: "Freedom is irrelevant. Self-determination is irrelevant. "
                    Catalyst: "I am fglrx, of Catalyst. Resistance is futile. Your life as it has been, is over. From this time forward, you will service us"

                    LOL really FAIL-

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Qaridarium View Post
                      i install kubuntu 11.10 again over the old system to rip out the catalyst... but the catalyst is still there...
                      the kubuntu 11.10 installation automatic install the catalyst if the old install do have the catalyst..

                      Catalyst =cyborg/borg attacking my system.

                      Catalyst: "You will be assimilated. Resistance is futile. "
                      Catalyst: "Freedom is irrelevant. Self-determination is irrelevant. "
                      Catalyst: "I am fglrx, of Catalyst. Resistance is futile. Your life as it has been, is over. From this time forward, you will service us"

                      LOL really FAIL-
                      ok my system works again but i have to remove and purge libgl1-mesa-dri

                      and this removes nearly all my installed packages in my system...

                      in my point of view its broken now i have to spend many time in installing my software again...

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                      • #26
                        Spambot detection is getting trickier

                        How long before spambots pass the Turing test? DM613's post here still is a copy from an earlier post, #3, albeit heavily modified to fool spam filters. The filters will have to step up and start spell and grammar check each post. The advantage is no more Youtube type comments, but the disadvantage would be that the filters might trap Q's posts.

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