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Ubuntu Has Another Special ATI Catalyst Driver?

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  • #31
    Originally posted by sgo. View Post
    Have a look at this thread. Takes no more than a minute, fglrx builds fine and works like a ch... ah... nevermind . Hope this will help you.
    Thanks. I will try it in VirtualBox first, because i have a Mobility HD 5470 and it is not officially supported.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by smitty3268 View Post
      Is anyone actually working on that medium term fix, or is it on the roadmap to eventually be done in a few years? I ask because it's already been 1 year, and it doesn't seem like it would take that long to accelerate a single operation. Unless you mean you are switching the whole driver to use EXA? That could take a year. Otherwise, it seems like you are prioritizing this bug very, very low, and I don't think that you can seriously argue that fglrx is ready for "normal" desktop use if that's the case. Maybe AMD isn't even saying that, and they're saying that if you can get lucky and get it working then great, but don't expect any more than that.
      Yes, we've been working on it for a while. I'm told that accelerating that function within the existing framework wasn't a good option.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by bridgman View Post
        2. Somewhere in late 2008 / early 2009 a problem appeared using Intel hardware, resulting in (IIRC) previously used screen buffers re-appearing on the screen, which could contain sensitive data.
        For the record, I have similar problems on my laptop using nvidia's binary drivers. They seem to be taking shortcuts to avoid the issue.

        But nobody seems to care because it's fast and the only sensitive data most users might have in their video memory is porn, anyway.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Melcar View Post
          It's being worked on. That I think is the most I can write without getting into trouble.
          catalyst 10.2 beta driver contain the new style 2d acceleration ---

          if all works best 10.2 will be a happy driver

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          • #35
            Originally posted by smitty3268 View Post
            I'm sure they do, these are smart guys and they know the quality of the product they're putting out.

            Honestly, if AMD just put out a roadmap stating when they thought all the various problems with fglrx might be solved, that would be a good start. Right now it's like Flash - there are so many problems and no indication about whether AMD even intends to fix them, let alone whether it's under progress now or scheduled for 5 years later.
            All I want is a roadmap stating when they'll switch into dropping fglrx and supporting the Open Source stack full steam. It is pretty solid in my Kubuntu Lucid test partition, but obviously a lot of speed ups and functionality need to still be coded in!

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            • #36
              Bridgman: is this a realistic expectation? (see my message just above, apparently you can't edit anymore) Any plans to transition to fully Open Source? Thanks!

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              • #37
                Not unless we decide to abandon the workstation market, which seems very unlikely.

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                • #38
                  AMD will not drop fglrx support.
                  The plan (as far as I understand) is to have the open source drivers alongside the proprietary.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by bridgman View Post
                    Not unless we decide to abandon the workstation market, which seems very unlikely.
                    If you don't mind educating me a bit: what's different for workstations? NDA's at the hardware level or the customers need somehow for binary only support?

                    Ultimately, I am a desktop user, and I am wondering if, long term, Open Source drivers will give the same level of performance as the binary ones (but with more stability). My hunch is that there is no reason why this should not be the case, but I am not a graphics guru at all.

                    Thanks for the answer! And for the good work, I am sticking to ATI for my graphics needs because it's open.

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                    • #40
                      Workstation users are generally quite 3D-intensive, and require (rather than desire) the same level of performance and functionality as Windows. This is where proprietary drivers shine, by allowing the implementation of APIs (OpenGL in this case) which are common across proprietary and free OSes to be shared without IP concerns.

                      I'm not aware of anyone who "needs" binary-only support, just that they need a level of functionality and performance which (for economic reasons) can not be separately implemented for each OS and which (for IP reasons, mostly related to DRM) can not practically be provided in open source form.

                      Obviously the OpenGL portion of the stack does not have much in the way of DRM-related IP, however the OpenGL portion of the stack relies heavily on lower level code which is shared between 2D, 3D and video on other OSes.

                      There is no reason in principle why open source drivers could not match or exceed the performance of proprietary drivers, it's just a question of manpower - which in turn is a function of market share and perceived business opportunity.

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                      • #41
                        Remember that Mesa still doesn't have the licenses to implement several patented OpenGL 3 technologies. So for that reason alone, the binary drivers are going to be superior for people who really need to use advanced features. I'm guessing blu-ray players would require a binary driver as well, although you can't get those on linux anyway.

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by mendieta View Post
                          All I want is a roadmap stating when they'll switch into dropping fglrx and supporting the Open Source stack full steam. It is pretty solid in my Kubuntu Lucid test partition, but obviously a lot of speed ups and functionality need to still be coded in!

                          Are you aware there are some applications/games which will never run properly with the open source drivers? You probably miss the point that there are many applications that have proprietary technologies which will be difficult to implement in open source drivers due to IP issues.For example,quake 4 uses s3tc texture compression,the license to which is owned by s3 technologies.There is a bad hack which will try to run the game with the open drivers,but it doesnt work that well.It only runs with a third party library which according to the radeon devs is buggy.

                          Luckily,you are not the only customer AMD has ,so hopefully they will always have a driver which supports all features on their hardware and lets users enjoy the very reason these cards were made.

                          For the reason stated above, both drivers will exist always.But in any case,i dont see the point of having 3d in any of the drivers ,Radeon or proprietary,other than wobbling windows on the desktop what else do linux users do anyway?No cutting edge games,no 3D CAD, no nothing really.No wonder,both drivers suck at 3D.Nvidia is a strange exception to the rule,probably have good 3d support for stuff like Pro/E which runs on Linux workstations with Nvidia cards.

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                          • #43
                            Originally posted by indus View Post
                            Luckily,you are not the only customer AMD has ,so hopefully they will always have a driver which supports all features on their hardware and lets users enjoy the very reason these cards were made.
                            That sounds great! When do you think that driver will be released?

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by indus View Post
                              Are you aware there are some applications/games which will never run properly with the open source drivers? You probably miss the point that there are many applications that have proprietary technologies which will be difficult to implement in open source drivers due to IP issues.
                              Yes, I wasn't aware, but bridgman (from AMD) later on clarified that (sad) fact to me. With the ongoing success of open source, though, things are going more and more open in the industry, so I can only hope this will not be the case in the future. Not for basic things like acceleration/encoding technologies.

                              The rest of your post is just bashing me and/or Linux with unfounded and outdated remarks, so I'll keep this short

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                              • #45
                                Originally posted by albatorsk View Post
                                That sounds great! When do you think that driver will be released?
                                mmm, in 10 years?

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