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  • Originally posted by CNCFarraday View Post
    Hmm... I might be able to get my hands on a 4870 x2 for testing purposes. Try a clean XP install. If you can - if you have a spare hdd around - try installing vista 32/64 and see how that works.
    I had Windows 7 beta running without problems for as long as I tried it. Everything was slower so I dumped it 64bit.

    Holy crap! A 1000W PSU??
    Motherboard 125W
    Phenom 9950 140W
    HD4870X2 350W
    125+140+350=615W

    And that's without the HDD and disc drives :P

    But we aren't there yet :-o Enter 80% efficiency >.<

    650W * 0,8 = 520W PSU
    1000W * 0,8 = 800W PSU

    Also , googling for <"club 3d" + HD4870X2> yields quite a few posts on various forums with people getting bsod on Windows XP with this card... It *could* be that Club3D made a shitty card... ?
    A suggested fix in the official ATI forum (http://forums.amd.com/game/messagevi...hreadid=115820) is to flash the BIOS and reinstall Windows. I have build this PC from scratch and so no ther card has ever been in the PCI slot and the HDD was also new (Samsung 1TB) and so the Windows XP install was kinda 'clean' enough As long as I don't have any other options left I might flas the BIOS but if it ain't broke that I don't want to flash it.

    Try to make sure it is adequately cooled, maybe it is overheating...
    Bridgman once said on this forums that the card could handle 120 degrees celsius. The CCC tells me the card is 60 degrees celsius idle (I opened up the case and put a household fan in front of it xD

    Comment


    • motherboard 125W? where do you get that numbers?
      same for the card? Have you confused overall energy usage with one component?

      I have/had a 125W cpu, an overclocked 3870 - itself a very hot card - and I had an energy consumption of:
      106W in KDE.

      with three harddisks. And 4 fans. And a hvd scsi card, sound card, tv card.

      Highest load was:
      300W - and to reach that I had to 'trick' the system. Because 'just gaming' or 'just compiling' did not break the 200W barrier.

      Comment


      • oh, and your mathematics are wrong. The Wattage of the PSU is on the mainboard side.

        So you would have got away with a 600W psu and still would have had headroom.

        Your 1000W psu is sucking in 1250W. And 700W are wasted. Well done!

        Comment


        • Originally posted by energyman View Post
          motherboard 125W? where do you get that numbers?
          http://tweakers.net/ <-Dutch website. But just looking at the cooler on that thing says enough. Google for a picture.

          I have/had a 125W cpu, an overclocked 3870 - itself a very hot card - and I had an energy consumption of:
          106W in KDE.
          You need a special motherboard to handle the Phenom 9950 X4 as that draws 140W. I googled for the right motherboard and somewhere on the official AMD forums I found which motherboard I needed. A 3870? I have two 4870's on one chip (hence the 'X2' behind the name). Oh and KDE (what version?) is not really a good reference for calculating how much power your computer needs under max load in order to stay stable. Also: it's a well accepted fact that PSU's with more than the minimum Watt requirement make your PC a little more stable.

          with three harddisks. And 4 fans. And a hvd scsi card, sound card, tv card.
          Yeah I have one 'large' fan, floppy drive, DVD-R, DVD-RW, Sata-3 HDD, webcam, wireless controller reciever, cardreader, front-audio and an external HDD and usually one USB stick plugged in.

          Highest load was:
          300W - and to reach that I had to 'trick' the system. Because 'just gaming' or 'just compiling' did not break the 200W barrier.
          Get Wine and download Steam (http://www.steampowered.com/) to get your CPU usage up to 100% (haha), then, while Steam Window is not minimised, go to YouTube with Firefox and the official Adobe Flash Plugin and stream this video in HD and put it on fullscreen: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R7yfISlGLNU
          That should at least get 2 CPU cores maxxed :') Now run the test again :P

          Comment


          • You can get decent results of your system's PSU requirements here:

            http://www.thermaltake.outervision.com

            Of course it might be a few watts off, but it still gives a good idea about general wattage requirements.

            Comment


            • my motherboard is 140W capable and officially supported the 140W phenoms.


              As I wrote, I did puish my system. Daily stuff, 106W. Tv? 116W. Compiling some fat package? 160W. Gaming? 160-200W. Artificially maxing the system? 300W.

              And with artificially maxing I used cpuburn cores*2+ut2004/vegastrike, while having find walking through my system.

              Measured on the plug side. So the system itself draw even less.

              I googled for your board and energy consumption:
              http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/mot...a790gp-ds4h/13

              doesn't look that high...

              Not high powered PSUs make your system stable. High quality make it stable. And high wattage and high quality are not the same - and with some psu's even mutual exclusive.

              In short, your PSU is way overpowered. You are wasting a lot of electricity and money.

              Comment


              • Originally posted by energyman View Post
                In short, your PSU is way overpowered. You are wasting a lot of electricity and money.
                On what? The PSU doesn't burn juice for nothing. Only for what's needed. It can *provide* up to 1000W, it doesn't *consume* 1000W by itself.

                Comment


                • no, it does waste electricity because it is so underloaded that it runs less effective

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by RealNC View Post
                    You can get decent results of your system's PSU requirements here:

                    http://www.thermaltake.outervision.com

                    Of course it might be a few watts off, but it still gives a good idea about general wattage requirements.
                    Kaboom baby: 574 Watts. The best PSU's have 80% efficency so 650 * 0.8 = 520 Watts. 520 - 574 = -54 Watts. Ah that means that a 650 Watt with a 85% CPU TDP use and 100% load (I can easily get that) is NOT enough.

                    n what? The PSU doesn't burn juice for nothing. Only for what's needed. It can *provide* up to 1000W, it doesn't *consume* 1000W by itself.
                    ^That. Anybody saying otherwise needs to go back to school.
                    Last edited by V!NCENT; 08-24-2009, 11:16 AM.

                    Comment


                    • you are still doing it wrong! The watt on the package are about the OUTPUT not the INPUT!

                      650W PSU = 650W on the package and on the system side, but it sucks 812W from the wall socket.

                      In your case a 650W PSU would be way more than enough.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by V!NCENT View Post
                        ^That. Anybody saying otherwise needs to go back to school.
                        look up efficency. Best, go to anandtech and read their huge article about the shortcomings of overblown psu's.

                        Comment


                        • Also, one thing you get wrong is that PSUs have the best rated efficiency at certain loads. For example, most high end PSUs have 90% efficiency when the load is higher than 80%. If the load on the PSU is lower (way lower in Vincent's case) the conversion efficiency is even lower.

                          Read some basic electronics and figure out what happens inside a power source.

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by CNCFarraday View Post
                            Also, one thing you get wrong is that PSUs have the best rated efficiency at certain loads. For example, most high end PSUs have 90% efficiency when the load is higher than 80%. If the load on the PSU is lower (way lower in Vincent's case) the conversion efficiency is even lower.

                            Read some basic electronics and figure out what happens inside a power source.
                            exactly - Vincent's psu should be below 20% load most of the time - and that means, less than 80% efficiency. Sometimes down to 50-60%... wasting lots and lots of power...

                            Comment


                            • this story reminds me of american cars with V8 5.4L engines... at 100bhp...

                              Just cause the number is bigger doesnt mean its better. But some people never get it. YEAH 5GHZ!!!

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by energyman View Post
                                exactly - Vincent's psu should be below 20% load most of the time - and that means, less than 80% efficiency. Sometimes down to 50-60%... wasting lots and lots of power...
                                thats right BUT!

                                less power efficiency does not mean less healty.

                                bigger one does also have bigger cooler passiv ones and aktiv ons

                                thats means if you only use 20% you also get a cooler one becourse of the bigger cooling system.

                                most of the time bigger one have also more quality becourse you cant build a bigger one cheaper thats becourse the cheap one will explote @1000watt outgoing.

                                but yes the efficiency is low thats right.

                                Comment

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