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AMD Releases OpenCL SDK For Linux Too

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  • #16
    I think you're just looking for things to complain about now.
    For beta programs, you need some kind of baseline to test it against. Guess what - if openSuse 11 is older than 11.1, it's likely to be stable (i.e they know the ins & outs of it). If it doesn't work on 11.1 then they've got a good start of where to look.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by mirv View Post
      I think you're just looking for things to complain about now.
      For beta programs, you need some kind of baseline to test it against. Guess what - if openSuse 11 is older than 11.1, it's likely to be stable (i.e they know the ins & outs of it). If it doesn't work on 11.1 then they've got a good start of where to look.
      Guess what when a official release is put out of a distro it is STABLE. Also distro's often mark a bug "To be fixed in next release" and those older releases never get the fix backported unless it's a security issue.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by deanjo View Post
        Exactly what? When I see instructions recommending downgrading to a old ass version it makes me wonder. Really to try out a beta product against a old and little used version does very little to addressing issues that may creep up in the newer official distro. If a bug is submitted against a newer in use mainstream distro then the developers can say "well it's not supported" and that gets nobody nowhere.
        there are tons of programs everyone uses that are only "supported" on certian distro's, doesn't mean it won't work, if you have a problem with it, THEN complain, or rather, file a report. no reason to jump the gun.

        Originally posted by deanjo View Post
        Guess what when a official release is put out of a distro it is STABLE. Also distro's often mark a bug "To be fixed in next release" and those older releases never get the fix backported unless it's a security issue.
        its relatively stable - big difference between relatively stable and very stable.

        perfect example - kubuntu 8,10 was not what i would call stable.

        now i've never used suse 11.0 or 11.1 for more then a half hour or so, so i'm not entirely sure where they rank, but thats besides the point anyway, like i said earlier, if you try it, and it doesn't work, that sucks, if its "unsupported" but works just fine, then be happy.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by AdrenalineJunky View Post
          there are tons of programs everyone uses that are only "supported" on certian distro's, doesn't mean it won't work, if you have a problem with it, THEN complain, or rather, file a report. no reason to jump the gun.
          To get the largest and most worthy feedback one has to test against what the largest share in a particular distro. With openSUSE that would be 11.1, 11.0 users make up for <10 % of current opensuse users.


          its relatively stable - big difference between relatively stable and very stable.

          perfect example - kubuntu 8,10 was not what i would call stable.

          now i've never used suse 11.0 or 11.1 for more then a half hour or so, so i'm not entirely sure where they rank, but thats besides the point anyway, like i said earlier, if you try it, and it doesn't work, that sucks, if its "unsupported" but works just fine, then be happy.
          The only fixes placed in openSUSE are critical and security updates. For a update to be put out as a critical it must meet this criteria.

          A vulnerability that could be easily exploited by a remote attacker to execute arbitrary code without prior authentication. In other words a vulnerability that could be leveraged by an Internet worm to spread without user interaction.
          NonSecurity : A software issue which might cause data loss or data corruption.
          Occasionally they will issue a patch marked as important, this is classified as

          A vulnerability whose exploitation could result in compromise of the confidentiality, integrity, or availability of users data, or of the integrity or availability of processing resources.
          An update to fix annoyance bugs are very rare and more often then not people are referred to running the unsupported upgrades to fix those issues. It is even more rare to see those fixes backported to older versions of the distro.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by deanjo View Post
            To get the largest and most worthy feedback one has to test against what the largest share in a particular distro. With openSUSE that would be 11.1, 11.0 users make up for <10 % of current opensuse users.
            Maybe they're using 11.0 in-house. It's beta, not production. The most worthy feedback they can have is if it works on their systems, but not on others - then they can look at the differences, what makes it break, and most importantly: why. Or have you never debugged a large project before?

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            • #21
              Originally posted by mirv View Post
              Or have you never debugged a large project before?
              Very large projects. I do it for a living. We constantly qualify our products against not only against current releases of OS's AND OS's that are set to be released in the future once developer previews are released. That's the whole idea of developer releases of OS's.

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              • #22
                Looks like a good development to me. Between Gallium3D and this OpenCL SDK, it should hopefully allow developers to write/test their OpenCL code against multiple compilers/libraries, which sounds great to me.

                Not only that, but it means that anyone who doesn't have a strong graphics card in their machine can still run OpenCL programs, albeit at a slower pace.

                And really, if they started development 8+ months ago, OpenSUSE 11.0 possibly was the latest release. They started developing on that version on some of their machines, and instead of upgrading their distro halfway through the development cycle, they finished on that release. Would you really want to introduce a completely unknown set of possible issues into your troubleshooting process halfway through a development cycle after you had already pinpointed a good number of the 11.0 release's issues? I don't know about you, but I'd finish development using my development system's current setup, and then worry about working the kinks out on newer versions.

                As has been said before, this is a beta release. They know it works on OpenSUSE 11.0, and Ubuntu 8.04. They'll eventually officially support newer versions, after they've tested the SDK on them more extensively. They've probably ran the SDK on newer versions, but just haven't really put it through its paces on newer releases yet.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Veerappan View Post
                  Looks like a good development to me. Between Gallium3D and this OpenCL SDK, it should hopefully allow developers to write/test their OpenCL code against multiple compilers/libraries, which sounds great to me.

                  Not only that, but it means that anyone who doesn't have a strong graphics card in their machine can still run OpenCL programs, albeit at a slower pace.

                  And really, if they started development 8+ months ago, OpenSUSE 11.0 possibly was the latest release. They started developing on that version on some of their machines, and instead of upgrading their distro halfway through the development cycle, they finished on that release. Would you really want to introduce a completely unknown set of possible issues into your troubleshooting process halfway through a development cycle after you had already pinpointed a good number of the 11.0 release's issues? I don't know about you, but I'd finish development using my development system's current setup, and then worry about working the kinks out on newer versions.

                  As has been said before, this is a beta release. They know it works on OpenSUSE 11.0, and Ubuntu 8.04. They'll eventually officially support newer versions, after they've tested the SDK on them more extensively. They've probably ran the SDK on newer versions, but just haven't really put it through its paces on newer releases yet.

                  I'm sure they did start development 8 or months ago, I'm not disputing that fact. Now let's look at the same type of project for Nvidia. Cuda 2.2 was in development months before openSUSE 11.1's release. Upon first released beta it was already qualified against openSUSE 10.1 - 11.1, SLED 10 - 11, RHEL 3 - 5, Fedora 7 - 10, Ubuntu 7.04 - 9.04. The latest official release even supports Win 7. The same goes for their openCL driver and SDK.

                  Is it any wonder why nvidia constantly beats ATI to the punch in supporting new distro's?

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                  • #24
                    I know that nvidia is overflowing with devs who work on driver and OS support. They're also more aggressive in targeting newer OS releases. ATI's drivers and software are mainly targeted at the professional market, where the latest OS is not as popular as it is for consumers.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by crumja View Post
                      I know that nvidia is overflowing with devs who work on driver and OS support. They're also more aggressive in targeting newer OS releases. ATI's drivers and software are mainly targeted at the professional market, where the latest OS is not as popular as it is for consumers.
                      If that was the case then they would be testing against SLED instead of openSUSE.

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                      • #26
                        I might point out that amd would know what systems their customers use better than anyone else. These things are not chosen willy-nilly.
                        But on topic, it's really good to see amd getting behind opencl like this. It will hopefully help tie cpu & gpu processing together to get the best performance overall with less tweaking effort.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by mirv View Post
                          I might point out that amd would know what systems their customers use better than anyone else.
                          This doesn't seem to be the case. Professional workstations typically use long term support releases over short term edge releases. This is why distributors of workstation class machines (ones that offer a suse flavor) bundle with SLE instead of openSUSE. SLE does get bug fixes that are not limited to critical or security releases where as openSUSE more often then not those fixes are incorporated in the next release.

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