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AMD Releases Display Library For Linux

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  • AMD Releases Display Library For Linux

    Phoronix: AMD Releases Display Library For Linux

    This afternoon AMD has released the Catalyst 9.3 driver for Windows along with ADL, or the AMD Display Library. The AMD Display Library is a cross-platform library that provides a single SDK to access graphics hardware information. In the past AMD has provided a few SDKs for obtaining this information on Windows, but this is the first time we are seeing such support on Linux.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=13610

  • #2
    This is very very exciting, especially the part on fan control. Well done Ati!

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    • #3
      *sigh* still no UVD

      Oh well, it will come at some point, just hoped it was now.

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      • #4
        can this library be used without using the rest of the proprietary driver?

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        • #5
          AFAIK it's an API into the proprietary driver. I don't think it does anything on its own.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by bridgman View Post
            AFAIK it's an API into the proprietary driver. I don't think it does anything on its own.
            well it certainly would make sense this way, so it doesnt interfere with the drivers own fancontrol...
            would be nice if it was the other way around and the driver would depend on the library for such things

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            • #7
              This sounds very interesting; let's hope, a nice app for all that will appear soon
              Also lm_sensors can now "learn" to read the GPUs status

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              • #8
                Very good AMD... let's just hope there are enough developers writing the open source driver.

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                • #9
                  well, it's an API that can be used on several operating systems for a single driver.

                  It would be more useful if there was an API for several drivers on a single platform, i.e. for all X drivers (including OS drivers, nVidia, intel, ..).
                  But meh, that's hardly AMD's fault

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                  • #10
                    Yeah, we don't have programming info for NVidia chips either

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                    • #11
                      bman,

                      How long before this is reverse engineered?

                      F

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by russofris View Post
                        How long before this is reverse engineered?
                        We're already working on it

                        Seriously, the only info obtainable from RE'ing this would be the power & thermal stuff that we're trying to get documented now. I think everything else is already either running in the open drivers or being worked on already. This isn't a standalone library, it's an API into a big honkin' binary driver, so RE'ing it would take some work.

                        Fan & temp info for 5xx and lower GPUs (and some early 6xx parts) would be pretty easy to figure out, but Alex has already talked about that (third-party temp sensor/fan controller chips hooked up by GPIO lines) and devs are already using the info.

                        Midway through the 6xx family we started rolling in a lot of changes to that area, including adding a fan controller on-chip, and (a) things got more complicated, (b) things started changing from one chip to the next. My guess is that we'll have documentation out first.

                        As a condition of installing or using the driver you agree not to reverse engineer, disassemble, bend, fold, spindle or mutilate it (although you are allowed to copy it), so obviously none of the fine Phoronix readers would be doing that anyways, right ?
                        Last edited by bridgman; 03-18-2009, 10:29 PM.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by bridgman View Post
                          We're already working on it

                          As a condition of installing or using the driver you agree not to reverse engineer, disassemble, bend, fold, spindle or mutilate it (although you are allowed to copy it), so obviously none of the fine Phoronix readers would be doing that anyways, right ?

                          Correct me if I'm wrong: for what I know, that's an illegal contract. Some contries allow reverse engineer, at least for studying purpose. But I might be wrong.

                          Even if it was legal, then I go againts the law. It's like saying I'm not allowed to understand how something works. This is against any form of human right. Well actually, all proprietary protocols and software in a good world, should be illegal

                          Microsoft time ago said a lot of open source softwares are illegal because they use patented things. Then I want to say that they are illegal because I can't know if their proprietary softwares are legal since I can't see the code.
                          Last edited by bulletxt; 03-18-2009, 10:55 PM.

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                          • #14
                            Yeah, every country is a bit different. Some countries definitely allow reverse engineering for specific purposes ("ensuring interoperability" is a popular catch-all), but most of those countries then put limits on what you can do with the information.

                            Pretty much everything is legal *somewhere*. You just have to worry about what happens when you or the information come home

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by bridgman View Post
                              Yeah, every country is a bit different. Some countries definitely allow reverse engineering for specific purposes ("ensuring interoperability" is a popular catch-all), but most of those countries then put limits on what you can do with the information.

                              Pretty much everything is legal *somewhere*. You just have to worry about what happens when you or the information come home
                              Hmm, interestingly enough here in Australia EULA clauses prohibiting reverse engineering are invalid (in contrast to eg. the US). I'm pleasantly surprised.

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