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EDID Modelines Direct From Your TV/Monitor (The Collection).

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  • #41
    Isn't the VESA driver limited to the modes supported by the video BIOS ? I'm not 100% sure but 1152xanything doesn't seem like a common BIOS mode.

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    • #42
      Maybe put it in dustbin

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      • #43
        Originally posted by Porter View Post
        So, Cirrus cards are sabotaged in X, but others are not?

        What exactly are you claiming?
        I am claiming (among other things) that the xorg.conf file and modelines have been arranged so that they do not provide the correct X-server settings for many popular screen resolutions.

        It seems that the favorite xorg.conf file misconfiguration is to set the hsync range and vrefresh ranges too low.

        In order to get them low enough, they are NOT read from the EDID, i.e., probed from the graphics card, and the numbers produced by X configuration programs (like Sax) are deliberately set too low.

        If you do not set them at all, then an hsync default range of 28.00-33.00 kHz is used. This is clearly too low and too narrow.

        The hsync and vrefresh ranges are needed for really old monitors without EDID, but if EDID is found, its values should clearly be those used.

        Since the X-server could very easily read the hsync range and vrefresh ranges from the EDID, why are they always wrongly set in the xorg.conf file?

        The reason is, that they were set to make it difficult for people to get graphics working properly (or at all) on Linux.

        I emphasize that:

        1) the X-server reads hsync and vrefresh ranges that are usually wrong

        2) the correct hsync and vrefresh ranges could be read from the EDID (just like the dot clock figure and other info is).

        3) the hsync and vrefresh ranges are usually set incorrectly and cause difficulties

        This is/was to cause problems getting graphics setup on Linux.
        Last edited by Jade; 12-02-2008, 08:34 AM.

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        • #44
          Originally posted by bridgman View Post
          Isn't the VESA driver limited to the modes supported by the video BIOS ? I'm not 100% sure but 1152xanything doesn't seem like a common BIOS mode.
          May not be common but they exist.

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          • #45
            Originally posted by Jade View Post
            If you do not set them at all, then an hsync default range of 28.00-33.00 kHz is used. This is clearly too low and too narrow.

            The hsync and vrefresh ranges are needed for really old monitors without EDID, but if EDID is found, its values should clearly be those used.

            Since the X-server could very easily read the hsync range and vrefresh ranges from the EDID, why are they always wrongly set in the xorg.conf file?
            My default xorg.conf file has no hsync or vsync ranges. The default xorg.conf file hasn't had that under Ubuntu for quite some time now.


            Here's the display section of my xorg.conf:

            Code:
            Section "Device"
                       Identifier  "Configured Video Device"
            EndSection
            
            Section "Monitor"
                       Identifier  "Configured Monitor"
            EndSection
            
            Section "Screen"
                       Identifier  "Default Screen"
                       Monitor     "Configured Monitor"
                       Device      "Configured Video Device"
            EndSection

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            • #46
              Originally posted by Porter View Post
              My default xorg.conf file has no hsync or vsync ranges. The default xorg.conf file hasn't had that under Ubuntu for quite some time now.
              Yes, it reads the hsync range and vrefresh ranges from EDID,... just like all Linux graphics configurations should have many years ago.

              The Linux X-server used to read values from the EDID,... but then they tossed away the hsync range and vrefresh ranges and used a very low and very narrow (and thus worse than useless) default.

              It is good to see that Ubuntu has changed that practice.
              Last edited by Jade; 12-02-2008, 04:36 PM.

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              • #47
                I don't think it's an Ubuntu practice... it's common to most recent X.org implementations as far as I know?

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                • #48
                  Originally posted by Porter View Post
                  I don't think it's an Ubuntu practice... it's common to most recent X.org implementations as far as I know?
                  Fedora 10 doesn't ship with an xorg.conf at all (at least the spin/config that I installed).

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                  • #49
                    ^ There you have it.

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                    • #50
                      Originally posted by Porter View Post
                      ^ There you have it.
                      The fact that things are (perhaps) done right now, for one or two distros, does not mean that all is, or has been, well.

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