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Recapping The AMD Kaveri Linux Experience

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  • Recapping The AMD Kaveri Linux Experience

    Phoronix: Recapping The AMD Kaveri Linux Experience

    Since last month's debut of the AMD Kaveri APUs there have been many Phoronix articles delivering Linux test results of the A10-7850K high-end APU. For those that unfortunately don't read Phoronix on a daily basis, here's a recap of some of our findings to date...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTU5Nzc

  • #2
    I just need to "get these mainboards fixed". Then I'll have one. Or two. There are nice offers on the market but some of them feature chips which seem (currently) not supported by the Linux kernel.

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    • #3
      HSA vs OpenCL vs C/C++ measured by power efficiency.

      Everybody is doing performance for HSA right now. That could be something new.
      (Btw. HSA is present in Linux Catalyst, right? If not then forget about it...)

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      • #4
        The list lacks 1 bad news:
        - No Mantle anytime soon

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        • #5
          I looked at my spare parts, and realised that if I buy a new mobo and processor for my gaming rig, I'll have enough parts to make a decent Linux gaming box to stick Steam on (dual booting isn't going well for me at the moment for reasons I won't go into). So I'm looking at what CPU to buy, and I think I'm going for an Ivy Bridge. God that's depressing, I'm buying for a reasonably high end gaming box, and my best option is from the last gen. I really wanted to have AMD give me a good option, but no, they can't even match Intel's last gen.

          I hope the devs start doing stuff with the GPU on the chip, because no self-respecting enthusiast has a box without dedicated graphics. So that silicon is sitting there doing nothing. And sadly, that's where all the innovation is going. Into a worthless pile of circuits that we don't use, just because nobody else is buying desktops any more.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by kaprikawn View Post
            I hope the devs start doing stuff with the GPU on the chip, because no self-respecting enthusiast has a box without dedicated graphics. So that silicon is sitting there doing nothing. And sadly, that's where all the innovation is going. Into a worthless pile of circuits that we don't use, just because nobody else is buying desktops any more.
            An enthusiast gaming on Linux. LOL ROFL.
            Kaveri has much better gpu performance than its last generation and there is no intel anywhere providing this performance/$. And there is no Haswell anywhere beating Kaveri graphics.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Kemosabe View Post
              An enthusiast gaming on Linux. LOL ROFL.
              Kaveri has much better gpu performance than its last generation and there is no intel anywhere providing this performance/$. And there is no Haswell anywhere beating Kaveri graphics.
              This is true at the moment but I am sure Intel is working hard at beating Kaveri and soon there could well be a Haswell that can beat Kaveri at its game.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by DeepDayze View Post
                This is true at the moment but I am sure Intel is working hard at beating Kaveri and soon there could well be a Haswell that can beat Kaveri at its game.
                There could be ARM developing a super-duper x86 killer right now. It could be revealed in 3 days and i am sure it will fit on current Intel MoBos.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Kemosabe View Post
                  There could be ARM developing a super-duper x86 killer right now. It could be revealed in 3 days and i am sure it will fit on current Intel MoBos.
                  Those ARM server chips from AMD come to mind.

                  In all seriousness, though, you don't need a really powerful CPU for gaming; a previous generation AMD FX or black edition cpu would probably be good enough, especially when complemented with a good discrete graphics solution. For me, an APU is plenty. YMMV, of course.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Kemosabe View Post
                    An enthusiast gaming on Linux. LOL ROFL.
                    That's basically me, thank you.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by kaprikawn View Post
                      I hope the devs start doing stuff with the GPU on the chip, because no self-respecting enthusiast has a box without dedicated graphics. So that silicon is sitting there doing nothing. And sadly, that's where all the innovation is going. Into a worthless pile of circuits that we don't use, just because nobody else is buying desktops any more.
                      It's a lot of work for very little gain for games. The amount of APU + dGPU users is small, and there's not much that would benefit from using a second gpu for accel.

                      But on the other hand, there are people who don't let it sit there doing nothing :P Make the iGPU mine some coins while you game for no perf hit.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Nobu View Post
                        Those ARM server chips from AMD come to mind.

                        In all seriousness, though, you don't need a really powerful CPU for gaming; a previous generation AMD FX or black edition cpu would probably be good enough, especially when complemented with a good discrete graphics solution. For me, an APU is plenty. YMMV, of course.
                        Most games are designed to avoid the CPU, because of the Xbox 360 and PS3. They have relatively week CPU's compared to what PCs have now. Because games sell better on those consoles then PS4/Xbone, nobody is going to make a game that's heavy on the CPU.

                        Physics is something I'd like to see more in games, like what you'd see in Everquest Next. That game will likely require a hefty CPU. You could do physics on the GPU, but why? The GPU is already over loaded with other tasks as it is.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by DeepDayze View Post
                          This is true at the moment but I am sure Intel is working hard at beating Kaveri and soon there could well be a Haswell that can beat Kaveri at its game.
                          Not a Haswell... they're not going to get significantly better than what already exists. Possibly Broadwell, the next generation... though I suspect not. Intel's graphics are decent, but on current comparison, they're a long way behind what AMD offer...

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by DeepDayze View Post
                            This is true at the moment but I am sure Intel is working hard at beating Kaveri and soon there could well be a Haswell that can beat Kaveri at its game.
                            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eu8Sekdb-IE

                            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rI_po8b2Dzw

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Nobu View Post
                              Those ARM server chips from AMD come to mind.

                              In all seriousness, though, you don't need a really powerful CPU for gaming; a previous generation AMD FX or black edition cpu would probably be good enough, especially when complemented with a good discrete graphics solution. For me, an APU is plenty. YMMV, of course.
                              They are very fast for ARM, but they can't come close to x86 in raw performance. It just doesn't seem to scale up on ARM. I.E. you can't just strap on a 140mm heatsink and OC the chip to 5Ghz+ to try and compete with even mid range x86.

                              All current ARM chips are still in the territory of the Intel Atom and AMD Bobcat series chips, meaning bottom end x86.

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