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ARM Still Working On ARMv7VE Support For GCC

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  • ARM Still Working On ARMv7VE Support For GCC

    Phoronix: ARM Still Working On ARMv7VE Support For GCC

    ARM developers are preparing to finally land support for ARMv7VE inside the GCC compiler...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTU0OTU

  • #2
    Considering the role of ARM today, I'd say virtualization is more important for ARM than any other modern architecture. In the server world, virtualization is nice because it prevents you from being restricted to a specific hardware platform. But, even for architectures like PPC, x86, SPARC, and maybe even MIPS, you can usually take a bare-metal setup and drop it in another computer (of the same architecture) without it completely failing. You absolutely cannot do that with ARM though - the kernels are heavily modified to the point that even if you have 2 systems of the same root architecture (but different brands), you usually will not be able to boot the system. Whether you're using ARM for home or server purposes, this is a problem and it's incredibly annoying. By doing virtualization, you can use whatever crappy kernel your ARM device requires and use the latest and greatest kernel in the VM with all the drivers you really want - ARM is simple enough that the only thing you'd be missing out on are GPU drivers, most of which are useless for linux anyway since they're GLES.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
      Considering the role of ARM today, I'd say virtualization is more important for ARM than any other modern architecture. In the server world, virtualization is nice because it prevents you from being restricted to a specific hardware platform. But, even for architectures like PPC, x86, SPARC, and maybe even MIPS, you can usually take a bare-metal setup and drop it in another computer (of the same architecture) without it completely failing. You absolutely cannot do that with ARM though - the kernels are heavily modified to the point that even if you have 2 systems of the same root architecture (but different brands), you usually will not be able to boot the system. Whether you're using ARM for home or server purposes, this is a problem and it's incredibly annoying.
      Yes! I'd also like to add a comment about locked down bootloaders and such. What the vendors are doing is preventing the proliferation of their own hardware. I can understand locking the radio to a certain network from a business standpoint, but I don't see how they benefit from locking down the OS.

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