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Intel Core i7 4960X "Ivy Bridge-E" Is A Beauty On Linux

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  • Intel Core i7 4960X "Ivy Bridge-E" Is A Beauty On Linux

    Phoronix: Intel Core i7 4960X "Ivy Bridge-E" Is A Beauty On Linux

    The Core i7 4960X Extreme Edition processor is Intel's new $1000+ CPU built atop their "Ivy Bridge" architecture and features six physical cores plus Hyper Threading. The i7-4960X is running at 3.6GHz with a 4.0GHz Turbo Frequency and is all around a super-fast processor. Under Linux, the performance is fantastic and it runs great on modern Linux distributions...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTQ3NzU

  • #2
    A beauty? An overpriced beast I would say.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by wargames View Post
      A beauty? An overpriced beast I would say.
      What a great way to put it.

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      • #4
        Nice chip!

        I benchmarked my i7 3820 against it.

        http://openbenchmarking.org/result/1...FO-1310043SO76

        Whoops! That should have been 4.3GHz not 4.6GHz!!!

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        • #5
          Originally posted by wargames View Post
          A beauty? An overpriced beast I would say.
          Intel is famous for squeezing every single...DIME from customers

          Also...130W TDP ? I know that there is a big difference in what that means for Intel compared with what it means for AMD but still...long gone is the time i wanted to make rigs with that kind of TDP...

          Majority of people in current economy don't even want to spend $1000 in a complete system...

          What i like about AMD is precisely the opposite approach..."enough" processing power for average John Doe and push integrated graphics performance as much as possible with everything in a chip with a affordable price tag...shame that their Linux graphic drivers are not on par with what they do for Window$....

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          • #6
            Surely there's a more economical way to get that kind of computing power, at least if one is willing to use more threads. Where are the 16 core CPUs anyway?

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