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Benchmarking The Intel P-State, CPUfreq Changes

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  • #16
    don't select governors.,...

    Originally posted by AnonymousCoward View Post
    95% does seem too high, honestly. Perhaps they designed it with the expectation that most CPU heavy loads would be hitting 100%.
    The native P state driver does NOT use cpufreq governors.... no point selecting or setting them (in fact, nothing good can come out that so please just don't do that)

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    • #17
      Originally posted by fenrus View Post
      The native P state driver does NOT use cpufreq governors.... no point selecting or setting them (in fact, nothing good can come out that so please just don't do that)
      also one general note: for benchmarks that run fully flat out, don't expect many changes; that's the easiest case where pretty much every governor will pick the highest performance point and stay there.
      the most interesting benchmarks for this sort of thing are cases where the cpu is not 100% busy.

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      • #18
        Wow!!! LMFAO! Somebody doesn't know the first thing about frequency governors or how to test them. Unless there is something particularly broken about them, when maximum CPU is demanded, they will ALL ramp the CPU up to full power. PERIOD. END OF STORY. That means that there WILL BE no difference in peak performance, which means that testing the peak performance of them is entirely absurd!

        What you need to test is POWER CONSUMPTION and SYSTEM RESPONSIVENESS at low to moderate loads.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by droidhacker View Post
          Wow!!! LMFAO! Somebody doesn't know the first thing about frequency governors or how to test them. Unless there is something particularly broken about them, when maximum CPU is demanded, they will ALL ramp the CPU up to full power. PERIOD. END OF STORY. That means that there WILL BE no difference in peak performance, which means that testing the peak performance of them is entirely absurd!

          What you need to test is POWER CONSUMPTION and SYSTEM RESPONSIVENESS at low to moderate loads.
          Not the powersave ones, and conservative can affect the non-peak performance.

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          • #20
            Powersavings ?

            Hi,

            The pstate is around now for several weeks and I wonder if there are people, who have actually measured some energy savings.

            So, before I try my newest kernel compilation, are there any powertop measurements or similar which could show
            improvements in battery life. This is what concerns me most, I am not interested in playing high-cpu games but to hear
            experiences in normal programming/email/surfing usage.

            Thanks to all the others

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            • #21
              I leave mine set to Performance all the time. OnDemand has a noticeable impact on system responsiveness. As measured by a Kill-A-Watt meter at the power outlet, there is zero difference in power savings between OnDemand and Performance, while the machine is idle. When the machine is not idle, I don't care about power consumption, I want max performance and max responsiveness.

              This is for a desktop machine BTW. Laptops are different, and even fractions of a watt add up to less heat and more battery time in a laptop, so maybe these other governors have some value in the laptop world.

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