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Linux DM-Crypt Being Parallelized

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  • Linux DM-Crypt Being Parallelized

    Phoronix: Linux DM-Crypt Being Parallelized

    Red Hat's Mikulas Patocka has posted a set of Linux kernel patches that parallelize the dm-crypt sub-system...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTM0NzQ

  • #2
    On modern hardware, I suspect this is pretty much moot anyway, thanks to AES-NI, right?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by pdffs View Post
      On modern hardware, I suspect this is pretty much moot anyway, thanks to AES-NI, right?
      probably, but that's only available since the last 2 processor "generations", or something like that. for normal workloads most people don't need anything faster than a core2quad and these don't have it.

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      • #4
        AES-NI can be used by dm-crypt, TrueCrypt, 7-Zip, OpenSSL, and by libraries such as Network Security Services (NSS), and the Crypto API in the Linux kernel.
        Last edited by uid313; 04-10-2013, 05:36 AM.

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        • #5
          Not everything is x86 or x86_64. Recent quad-core ARM CPUs obviously lack AES-NI and could conceivably benefit from this.

          Also, AES-NI only improves performance for AES. AES is probably the most common algorithm for bulk encryption, but it is not the only algorithm out there.

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          • #6
            AES-NI isn't available in low-end intel processors. Not even the last generation of i3's has it (i3-3240 for example: http://ark.intel.com/products/65690/...Cache-3_40-GHz). Most i5 has it, but not all (2nd gen i5: i5-750 http://ark.intel.com/products/42917/...Cache-2_40-GHz). Intels "market segmentation is a bit weird and not always easy to follow. I always check ark.intel.com before pressing "buy" on processors to make sure I get the features I want.

            Either way, parallelization seems reasonable if it can be made to not hurt efficiency when io-loads are low.

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            • #7
              More things parallelizable

              What else hasn't been made parallel that would benefit most Linux users?
              Honest question. This is basically low-hanging fruit nowadays.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Qaz` View Post
                AES-NI isn't available in low-end intel processors.
                I wouldn't even go so far as to call it low-end, AES-NI is unfortunately disabled on the majority of Intels CPUs:

                According to Geizhals.de/Skinflint.co.uk there are currently 117 socket 1155 CPUs available from Intel. Of those, slightly less than half (58) support AES-NI.

                That looks good initially until you notice there is just a SINGLE dual core cpu with AES-NI support: Core i5-3470T.
                Basically, unless you get a quad core today (which will cost you upwards of 150€) you will not have AES-NI from Intel. And of course, four cores in a file-server are a bit of a waste...

                Fortunately, AMD offers AES-capable CPUs starting at 40€ so not all is lost!

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                • #9
                  With the AES talk I wondered how Via's old hw block Padlock stacked up against AES-NI instructions. Voila google: http://grantmcwilliams.com/tech/tech...s-amd-hexacore

                  AES-NI has 2-3x more performance over a C3 Padlock, which still beats a 6-core cpu without those instructions.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by anybody View Post
                    I wouldn't even go so far as to call it low-end, AES-NI is unfortunately disabled on the majority of Intels CPUs:

                    According to Geizhals.de/Skinflint.co.uk there are currently 117 socket 1155 CPUs available from Intel. Of those, slightly less than half (58) support AES-NI.

                    That looks good initially until you notice there is just a SINGLE dual core cpu with AES-NI support: Core i5-3470T.
                    Basically, unless you get a quad core today (which will cost you upwards of 150€) you will not have AES-NI from Intel. And of course, four cores in a file-server are a bit of a waste...

                    Fortunately, AMD offers AES-capable CPUs starting at 40€ so not all is lost!
                    Wow, that is really pathetic, Intel. Glad AMD is doing it right...

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by swrx View Post
                      Not everything is x86 or x86_64. Recent quad-core ARM CPUs obviously lack AES-NI and could conceivably benefit from this.

                      Also, AES-NI only improves performance for AES. AES is probably the most common algorithm for bulk encryption, but it is not the only algorithm out there.
                      exactly

                      my core i7 e.g. lynnfield doesn't have aes-ni or avx - so I'm grateful that all the x86_64 optimizations exist (CONFIG_CRYPTO_BLOWFISH_X86_64, CONFIG_CRYPTO_CAMELLIA_X86_64, CONFIG_CRYPTO_SERPENT_SSE2_X86_64, CONFIG_CRYPTO_TWOFISH_X86_64, CONFIG_CRYPTO_TWOFISH_X86_64_3WAY)


                      will try those patches out - let's see if it cuts down latency on these

                      dm-crypt/luks -> lvm -> filesystem layouts


                      edit:

                      ok seems like it's still heavily worked on, debated

                      so will try it a later time
                      Last edited by kernelOfTruth; 04-29-2013, 01:39 PM.

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                      • #12
                        isn't it already sort of parallel ?


                        I remember having used a patch for that few years ago:

                        DM-CRYPT: Scale to multiple CPUs v3

                        and it looks like it's already included at least in some form

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