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Intel Makes Cryptography Faster On Linux

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  • Intel Makes Cryptography Faster On Linux

    Phoronix: Intel Makes Cryptography Faster On Linux

    The Linux 3.8 kernel is continuing to pull in massive amounts of new code as shown by all of the noteworthy pull requests that have been highlighted on Phoronix in the past few days. The latest pull request to catch my interest has been the crypto work, thanks to performance-enhancing additions by Intel...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTI1MjE

  • #2
    ISA bloat

    If you add new instructions to the instruction set architecture every time there is a new algorithm then you eventually end up with a pretty bloated instruction set architecture.

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    • #3
      I was also wondering why not just implement lower level instructions and let the cryptography algorithms use them.
      Same about video - they put decoders of codecs right into silicon, doing so imo only makes sense on small devices where being paranoid about power usage is ok.

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      • #4
        AFAIK you don't get the performance gain if the instructions are any lower level. Might be possible to generalize them a bit more I guess...

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        • #5
          Don't forget the LZO improvement:
          https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kern...1915e5ae057826

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          • #6
            100% wrong

            Originally posted by uid313 View Post
            If you add new instructions to the instruction set architecture every time there is a new algorithm then you eventually end up with a pretty bloated instruction set architecture.
            If you DO NOT add new instructions to the instruction set every time there is a new algorithm, then you eventually end up with "Microsoft" style APIs where you call the one single "Do everything" API and then you have to pass in a struct with the actual commands that you want to execute and then you end up with EVEN MORE BLOAT.

            YOU DO KNOW that processors have been invented that have ONE move instruction and no other instructions at all! NOP is just moving a register onto itself. Everything you do depends on which register you choose as the source or target. NATURALLY there is JUST AS MUCH BLOAT in this implementation as any other.

            TELL US is there MORE bloat in a wide API where each API function is cleanly written with its own entry point, or in YOUR scenario where the library must have a big switch statement and logic decoding just to figure out what the user wanted to do?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by frantaylor View Post
              If you DO NOT add new instructions to the instruction set every time there is a new algorithm, then you eventually end up with "Microsoft" style APIs where you call the one single "Do everything" API and then you have to pass in a struct with the actual commands that you want to execute and then you end up with EVEN MORE BLOAT.

              YOU DO KNOW that processors have been invented that have ONE move instruction and no other instructions at all! NOP is just moving a register onto itself. Everything you do depends on which register you choose as the source or target. NATURALLY there is JUST AS MUCH BLOAT in this implementation as any other.

              TELL US is there MORE bloat in a wide API where each API function is cleanly written with its own entry point, or in YOUR scenario where the library must have a big switch statement and logic decoding just to figure out what the user wanted to do?
              WHAT'S up WITH your CAPS lock? NEED new KEYBOARD?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by frantaylor View Post
                If you DO NOT add new instructions to the instruction set every time there is a new algorithm, then you eventually end up with "Microsoft" style APIs where you call the one single "Do everything" API and then you have to pass in a struct with the actual commands that you want to execute and then you end up with EVEN MORE BLOAT.

                YOU DO KNOW that processors have been invented that have ONE move instruction and no other instructions at all! NOP is just moving a register onto itself. Everything you do depends on which register you choose as the source or target. NATURALLY there is JUST AS MUCH BLOAT in this implementation as any other.

                TELL US is there MORE bloat in a wide API where each API function is cleanly written with its own entry point, or in YOUR scenario where the library must have a big switch statement and logic decoding just to figure out what the user wanted to do?
                I guess you can design nice APIs with object-oriented programming and pluggable modules that implements interfaces or inherits from another class.

                The more instructions you add to the instruction set architecture the more it become CISC and it eventually turns into VAX. Then those algorithms gets old and outdated to newer and improved algorithms and they just become legacy baggage on modern hardware.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by mark45 View Post
                  WHAT'S up WITH your CAPS lock? NEED new KEYBOARD?
                  YOU seem to be suffering from the SAME problem!

                  Do YOU speak in monotone ALL THE TIME? DO YOU EVER USE INFLECTION?

                  WHY do you CHANGE THE LANGUAGE YOU SPEAK when you sit in front of the computer? Why do you REMOVE ALL THE INFLECTION? Is there some sort of bandwidth issue with processing ALL THOSE EXTRA BITS?

                  GO read ZIPPY THE PINHEAD and perhaps you can COMPLAIN TO HIM TOO!
                  Last edited by frantaylor; 12-14-2012, 12:23 PM.

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                  • #10
                    Dude, only stupid people use caps lock all the time, and take a hike to calm down.

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