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  • Command to check CPU speed

    Was thinking is there a command to see dynamic cpu speed ?

    I know lshw and cat /proc/cpuinfo list speed with other details but I think its not the real deal.. Cause if AMD C'nQ is enable the speed should be lower than the exact/default one...

    So if you use any command please do let know..

    Also does AMD Cool N QUite work with Linux ? Is there a CPU Speed Scaling utility for KDE .. There is one gnome-scrip for gnome desktop but didn't came around anything similar for KDE4 !

    Regards

  • #2
    Originally posted by Dark_Star View Post
    Also does AMD Cool N QUite work with Linux ? Is there a CPU Speed Scaling utility for KDE .. There is one gnome-scrip for gnome desktop but didn't came around anything similar for KDE4 !
    There's a very nice power-management tool in kde's systemsettings (click on the advanced-tab and then there should be a button power-management), which among other things allows you to set your cpufreq-gouvernor (performance, on-demand, powersaving). That's of course if your setup supports this (hal with acpi-support, kernel with CnQ support, etc), but that should be the case with most end-user-targeted distros, like the *buntus and so on.

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    • #3
      That basically for laptops.. I already played with a lot..

      Gnome CPU scaling lets me scale speed but that kde powerdevil doesn't allow to scale cpu speed at will..

      Is there a command to see CPU speed ? which show dynamic changes ?

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      • #4
        You can see more info in
        Code:
        /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu0/cpufreq/
        (on debian-based systems, not sure about others)
        eg. here I get:
        Code:
        $ cat /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu0/cpufreq/scaling_available_frequencies
        1733000 1333000 1067000 800000
        You could have a look at cpudyn. More info here. It's in the current ubuntu repos.

        However I'm not sure that this will result in actual longer battery life than dynamic scaling in practice.
        I suspect that briefly speeding up the CPU for a task, then slowing it down again will consume less power than keeping it at a low frequency for the duration of a task, since other hardware power draw remains the same.

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        • #5
          If you just want to see your current CPU speed? I use cpufreq-info. Looks like this.

          Code:
          wyatt@Tsubasa ~ $ cpufreq-info
          cpufrequtils 002: cpufreq-info (C) Dominik Brodowski 2004-2006
          Report errors and bugs to linux@brodo.de, please.
          analyzing CPU 0:
            driver: acpi-cpufreq
            CPUs which need to switch frequency at the same time: 0
            hardware limits: 800 MHz - 2.00 GHz
            available frequency steps: 2.00 GHz, 1.60 GHz, 1.33 GHz, 1.07 GHz, 800 MHz
            available cpufreq governors: conservative, ondemand, powersave, userspace, performance
            current policy: frequency should be within 800 MHz and 1.33 GHz.
                            The governor "ondemand" may decide which speed to use
                            within this range.
            current CPU frequency is 800 MHz.

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          • #6
            Code:
            [shashwat@localhost ~]$ cpufreq-info
            cpufrequtils 005: cpufreq-info (C) Dominik Brodowski 2004-2006
            Report errors and bugs to cpufreq@vger.kernel.org, please.
            analyzing CPU 0:
              no or unknown cpufreq driver is active on this CPU
            analyzing CPU 1:
              no or unknown cpufreq driver is active on this CPU
            analyzing CPU 2:
              no or unknown cpufreq driver is active on this CPU
            How do I fix this ?

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            • #7
              Use a kernel with cpufreq (should be any 2.6.xx). What disro are you on, or is it a custom kernel?

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              • #8
                Its kernel 2.6.29.3 and I am using Mandriva 2009.1,,,

                Its not a custom kernel !

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                • #9
                  I have this too! Have been looking for a solution.

                  I'm using a Core2Duo E4300 on a Gigabyte GA-965P-DS3P, using 2.6.29-r5 (gentoo-sources).

                  I don't seem to be able to get any kind of freq/voltage throttling to work either.

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                  • #10
                    watch -n1 cat /proc/cpuinfo since cpuinfo shows the current speed.

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