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  • Command to check CPU speed

    Was thinking is there a command to see dynamic cpu speed ?

    I know lshw and cat /proc/cpuinfo list speed with other details but I think its not the real deal.. Cause if AMD C'nQ is enable the speed should be lower than the exact/default one...

    So if you use any command please do let know..

    Also does AMD Cool N QUite work with Linux ? Is there a CPU Speed Scaling utility for KDE .. There is one gnome-scrip for gnome desktop but didn't came around anything similar for KDE4 !

    Regards

  • #2
    Originally posted by Dark_Star View Post
    Also does AMD Cool N QUite work with Linux ? Is there a CPU Speed Scaling utility for KDE .. There is one gnome-scrip for gnome desktop but didn't came around anything similar for KDE4 !
    There's a very nice power-management tool in kde's systemsettings (click on the advanced-tab and then there should be a button power-management), which among other things allows you to set your cpufreq-gouvernor (performance, on-demand, powersaving). That's of course if your setup supports this (hal with acpi-support, kernel with CnQ support, etc), but that should be the case with most end-user-targeted distros, like the *buntus and so on.

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    • #3
      That basically for laptops.. I already played with a lot..

      Gnome CPU scaling lets me scale speed but that kde powerdevil doesn't allow to scale cpu speed at will..

      Is there a command to see CPU speed ? which show dynamic changes ?

      Comment


      • #4
        You can see more info in
        Code:
        /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu0/cpufreq/
        (on debian-based systems, not sure about others)
        eg. here I get:
        Code:
        $ cat /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu0/cpufreq/scaling_available_frequencies
        1733000 1333000 1067000 800000
        You could have a look at cpudyn. More info here. It's in the current ubuntu repos.

        However I'm not sure that this will result in actual longer battery life than dynamic scaling in practice.
        I suspect that briefly speeding up the CPU for a task, then slowing it down again will consume less power than keeping it at a low frequency for the duration of a task, since other hardware power draw remains the same.

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        • #5
          If you just want to see your current CPU speed? I use cpufreq-info. Looks like this.

          Code:
          wyatt@Tsubasa ~ $ cpufreq-info
          cpufrequtils 002: cpufreq-info (C) Dominik Brodowski 2004-2006
          Report errors and bugs to linux@brodo.de, please.
          analyzing CPU 0:
            driver: acpi-cpufreq
            CPUs which need to switch frequency at the same time: 0
            hardware limits: 800 MHz - 2.00 GHz
            available frequency steps: 2.00 GHz, 1.60 GHz, 1.33 GHz, 1.07 GHz, 800 MHz
            available cpufreq governors: conservative, ondemand, powersave, userspace, performance
            current policy: frequency should be within 800 MHz and 1.33 GHz.
                            The governor "ondemand" may decide which speed to use
                            within this range.
            current CPU frequency is 800 MHz.

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          • #6
            Code:
            [shashwat@localhost ~]$ cpufreq-info
            cpufrequtils 005: cpufreq-info (C) Dominik Brodowski 2004-2006
            Report errors and bugs to cpufreq@vger.kernel.org, please.
            analyzing CPU 0:
              no or unknown cpufreq driver is active on this CPU
            analyzing CPU 1:
              no or unknown cpufreq driver is active on this CPU
            analyzing CPU 2:
              no or unknown cpufreq driver is active on this CPU
            How do I fix this ?

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            • #7
              Use a kernel with cpufreq (should be any 2.6.xx). What disro are you on, or is it a custom kernel?

              Comment


              • #8
                Its kernel 2.6.29.3 and I am using Mandriva 2009.1,,,

                Its not a custom kernel !

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                • #9
                  I have this too! Have been looking for a solution.

                  I'm using a Core2Duo E4300 on a Gigabyte GA-965P-DS3P, using 2.6.29-r5 (gentoo-sources).

                  I don't seem to be able to get any kind of freq/voltage throttling to work either.

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                  • #10
                    watch -n1 cat /proc/cpuinfo since cpuinfo shows the current speed.

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                    • #11
                      Yes, indeed. The problem isn't that I don't know the CPU speed, but that I can't get cpu-freq to work, and I can't get throttling to occur. All the error messages I get relate to the cpu driver (or a lack thereof).

                      I compiled the kernel myself and made sure to include all the ACPI stuff, plus the relevant power governots and the P-states driver. I also tried both with and without the Intel Enhanced Speedstep (which seems to be deprecated), to no avail.

                      Most of the guides I see tell people to modprobe the module - but I've compiled mine in, so I assume it should all just be there all the time. Should recompile with all these things as modules instead?

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Wingfeather View Post
                        ...d I can't get throttling to occur. ....
                        I had some similar issues with my overclocked system. (3.0Ghz) When I reset the bios so CPU speed was "Auto" the frequency scaling started working. (1.40Ghz and 2.7Ghz)

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                        • #13
                          yeah, if you overclock, throttling does not work. Throttling depends in bios tables. You overclock, bios does not have fitting tables, no tables exported to the kernel, no throttling. It is really that easy

                          (maybe some bios are able to generate tables for OCed cpu's - but I have yet to meet them).

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                          • #14
                            Ah! Thanks, guys. As it turns out, I am overclocking. I hadn't thought of that. However, it does surprise me that this is the case, since throttling does appear to work under windows XP with this same setup.

                            Do the two OSes use different systems for their throttling?

                            Ta!

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                            • #15
                              linux trusts the bios.
                              you might have vendor drivers installed that help with that.

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