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  • Imagination Launches A MIPS Development Board

    Phoronix: Imagination Launches A MIPS Development Board

    To compete with the growing number of single-board development computers in the ARM space and even in the x86 space, Imagination Technologies has introduced their first public MIPS single-board computer for developers. While it won't likely see the success of the Raspberry Pi, it's an interesting piece of hardware to say the least and hopefully we'll be able to benchmark it at Phoronix...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTc3NjY

  • #2
    PowerVR SGX540 graphics
    I already see tons of happy Linux users around...

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    • #3
      Originally posted by _SXX_ View Post
      I already see tons of happy Linux users around...
      Yeah, funny that they try to appeal to Linux enthusiasts without even a semblance of an open-source driver.

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      • #4
        Imagination Technologies? PowerVR? No, thanks.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by _SXX_ View Post
          I already see tons of happy Linux users around...
          But but but.. I thought those binary blob NVIDIA / ATI drivers were so awesome.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by brad0 View Post
            But but but.. I thought those binary blob NVIDIA / ATI drivers were so awesome.
            Nvidia's drivers can quite easily be installed on any particular distro and Nvidia is quick to update them as needed for new kernels and X versions. Catalyst is a bit more of a hassle and it takes AMD a bit longer for updates required by new kernel/X versions, but it's workable. That's why those are accepted by many, because they generally work. Which can't be said at all for PowerVR drivers.

            So nice attempt at humor or something, but it falls flat because there's a world of difference between Nvidia/AMD blobs and PowerVR blobs.

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            • #7
              http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/...ervr,3890.html

              Interesting times ahead. I wonder if they'll make serious attempts at the mobile space, or if they'll focus their work on areas like IoT, routers (already a big area for them), and the like.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Gusar View Post
                Nvidia's drivers can quite easily be installed on any particular distro and Nvidia is quick to update them as needed for new kernels and X versions. Catalyst is a bit more of a hassle and it takes AMD a bit longer for updates required by new kernel/X versions, but it's workable. That's why those are accepted by many, because they generally work. Which can't be said at all for PowerVR drivers.

                So nice attempt at humor or something, but it falls flat because there's a world of difference between Nvidia/AMD blobs and PowerVR blobs.
                Binary blobs suck period, end of story.

                It's called sarcasm. Nahh, it doesn't fall flat at all. Keep deluding yourself.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by brad0 View Post
                  Binary blobs suck period, end of story.
                  Err, no, just because you say so, it's not end of story. There's a lot more to it. You can have your black and white view if you want, but that's just you, don't think what you say applies to others (there's for sure those who think similarly, but there's a lot who think differently).

                  Originally posted by brad0 View Post
                  It's called sarcasm. Nahh, it doesn't fall flat at all. Keep deluding yourself.
                  The world of difference between these blobs is no delusion. So yeah, your sarcasm does fall flat.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Gusar View Post
                    Nvidia's drivers can quite easily be installed on any particular distro and Nvidia is quick to update them as needed for new kernels and X versions. Catalyst is a bit more of a hassle and it takes AMD a bit longer for updates required by new kernel/X versions, but it's workable. That's why those are accepted by many, because they generally work. Which can't be said at all for PowerVR drivers.

                    So nice attempt at humor or something, but it falls flat because there's a world of difference between Nvidia/AMD blobs and PowerVR blobs.
                    http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/...ce,3743-6.html

                    Say what you will about them, but they make the best driver. Some of that has to be due to osx efficiency, however.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by liam View Post
                      http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/...ce,3743-6.html

                      Say what you will about them, but they make the best driver. Some of that has to be due to osx efficiency, however.
                      Those graphs do look impressive, however these benchmark results mean nothing to owners of CedarView machines, for example. I'm not interested in their tech until they provide at least Nvidia-style continuous updates for their blob, if they don't want to release open drivers and/or specs.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Gusar View Post
                        Those graphs do look impressive, however these benchmark results mean nothing to owners of CedarView machines, for example. I'm not interested in their tech until they provide at least Nvidia-style continuous updates for their blob, if they don't want to release open drivers and/or specs.
                        I'm not saying ANYTHING other than what I said. They make great drivers.
                        Personally, I would never buy them. I do have one device (nexus s) that has pvr graphics but it's old, and no longer being used. Also, it was a nexus so it had had proper updates.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by liam View Post
                          Personally, I would never buy them. I do have one device (nexus s) that has pvr graphics but it's old, and no longer being used.
                          You know what? I too have a device with PVR graphics! Seriously . Motorola Defy, still use it, will continue to do so until it breaks. I was looking at the Nexus S back then, but I deemed it too expensive, so I went with the Defy. But the phone runs Android anyway, not a traditional Linux distro, so open drivers weren't so important to me, a vibrant modding community was, which the Defy does have.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Gusar View Post
                            You know what? I too have a device with PVR graphics! Seriously . Motorola Defy, still use it, will continue to do so until it breaks. I was looking at the Nexus S back then, but I deemed it too expensive, so I went with the Defy. But the phone runs Android anyway, not a traditional Linux distro, so open drivers weren't so important to me, a vibrant modding community was, which the Defy does have.
                            The S was pretty cheap for what it was (like all but the first nexus). That, and that it was running the latest vanilla android were, and are, the reasons to buy one.
                            If you want to run open software checkout inforce hardware. That's what rob clark hacks on.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by brad0 View Post
                              But but but.. I thought those binary blob NVIDIA / ATI drivers were so awesome.
                              If we talk about embedded, Nvidia actually released opensource driver for Tegra if I remember correctly. Probably Tegra is one of first of embedded ICs with opensource GPU drivers. I wish Nvidia stopped bitching and did the same for desktop (Intel and AMD already doing something like this, he-he).

                              In embedded world, proprietary driver not just a bit of headache. It is some thing with appaling reputation which is ACTIVELY UNWELCOME, since it puts ton of moron restrictions on system builder. Needless to say, WE HATE BLOBS. Blobs are the absolutely worst part you can face in embedded system. Most Linux devs and builders/integrators are likely kill blobs on sight (if they can).

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