Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Gigabyte GA-P35-DS3P

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Gigabyte GA-P35-DS3P

    Phoronix: Gigabyte GA-P35-DS3P

    Gigabyte has long been a very big name in computer hardware. They manufacture almost any sort of hardware you can imagine. High quality computer cases, motherboards, video cards, laptops, CPU coolers, you name it they have it (they even have a cell phone!). Like ASUS, they are able to diversify and cover a massive segment of the industry, and they are able to do this without sacrificing quality and performance. An impressive feat indeed. Not so long ago, Gigabyte made a massive splash in the enthusiast/overclocking world with their release of the board known as the DS3. The 965P-DS3 was one of the best overclocking motherboards ever to be released on the market. Not only was it brilliantly designed, but very importantly, it was brilliantly priced. Everyone could afford it because it was not only better performing, but also cheaper than the competition. Overclocking was BY FAR the easiest we have ever encountered in all our years of experience. This is also partially because almost all of the Core 2 Duos are simply beasts. The P35-DS3P that we will be looking at today carries the same DS3 mark. This board is really the successor to the incredible 965P-DS3 and should be held to the same standards of quality and performance.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=11001

  • #2
    I have got a similar board (GA-G33-DS3R), but never had issues with network in dual boot, maybe your WIN driver was too old? It does not like to boot from grub with USB cdrom, isolinux boots. One thing with OC, when you for example would lower the multi then WIN shows correct speed, but when you use LINUX then you see a speed which would be shown when the original multi was used. You could try that if you like to.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Kano View Post
      I have got a similar board (GA-G33-DS3R), but never had issues with network in dual boot, maybe your WIN driver was too old? It does not like to boot from grub with USB cdrom, isolinux boots. One thing with OC, when you for example would lower the multi then WIN shows correct speed, but when you use LINUX then you see a speed which would be shown when the original multi was used. You could try that if you like to.
      I'm looking at getting a GA-G35-DS3R board and was glad to read a review on the GA-G35-DS3P which should be similar in setup and application regarding Linux.

      Actually, there is a thread in the Ubuntu forums devoted to the network issue with the GA-G35-DS3R/P boards. It seems it's universal but a minor thing. More of an inconvenience if anything. It sounds like a decent board to use with Linux which is good because I've been considering the board for a while because of the price. I only need a PSU and GPU besides the MB.

      Comment


      • #4
        G35 can only combined with ICH8(R) instead of ICH9(R), but the difference is rather small. You need a Linux distribution with kernel 2.6.22+ and relative new Xorg. Ubuntu Gutsy would work out of the box, but if you want something Debian Etch based I could help you too with a Xorg backport.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Kano View Post
          G35 can only combined with ICH8(R) instead of ICH9(R), but the difference is rather small. You need a Linux distribution with kernel 2.6.22+ and relative new Xorg. Ubuntu Gutsy would work out of the box, but if you want something Debian Etch based I could help you too with a Xorg backport.
          I meant I'm considering a GA-P35-DS3R board, sorry!

          Does that mean it's more likely to be supported out-of-the-box? I can use debian-based distros like Ubuntu/Kubuntu/Etch etc. or Fedora? Maybe kernel .20+?

          Comment


          • #6
            ICH9R alone is no problem with current kernels. But the G33/G35 would be interesting too if you want to try the intel onboard drivers. Usually the price is the same, just firewire missing and the serial port needs a slot bracket.

            Comment


            • #7
              Is there any issue with sound with these motherboards? I went to the Realtek site and although Linux drivers are listed, none of the Realtek (audio) chipsets/codecs listed there are ALC889 (Gigabyte P35 boards usually have that one). ALC888 is listed so an Abit IP35 Pro mb (has the ALC888) probably wouldn't have an issue?

              Comment


              • #8
                There were no sound issues with the GA-P35-DS3P during testing, it worked out well.
                Michael Larabel
                http://www.michaellarabel.com/

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thanks for the quick confirmation.

                  I read someplace that Linux (well, one distro is claimed to, anyway) reads the ALC889A codec as ALC885 but the concern there is an issue is alleviated to discover the sound works without additional tweaking. Thanks.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Out of stock?

                    It seems this board is out of stock at almost every vendor. For instance, newegg is estimating they'll have them 10/01. Do you think they're transitioning to rev 2.0? Or is there something wrong with this board that they're recalling them?

                    Thanks.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Short questions because I want to buy a board of the same series, just the "plain" version with only one pcie x16 slot (either the DS3 or the DS3R):

                      1) Does IDE on this board work out of the box or are there some problems with it? I would have to use IDE for an optical drive and a hd.

                      2) What about sensors support? Does lm-sensors support this board already with all sensors or what is the current status?


                      BTW: I would really welcome a test with a vanilla kernel in those mainboard reviews. I have no idea how many patches and such are applied to the kernels shipped with some distributions and personally I prefer to at least have the option to switch to a vanialla kernel. In such it would be nice to have a test if everything works nicely with vanialla and attaching a config file that does support all the stuff, too.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        jmircon is supported in current vanilla kernels. CONFIG_PATA_JMICRON option.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Hi,I have this motherboard (GA x38-DQ6) and I have a question about the raid. Does Ubuntu Gutsy support ICH9R chipset? I would like to set raid 5 but I don't know if it's possible in Ubuntu Gutsy. If it's possible, whick program I have to use so as to install ubuntu gutsy in a raid array? Is there some guide?


                          Thanks in advance!
                          Last edited by ]--Freeman--[; 01-16-2008, 05:07 AM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Raid 5 should be possible with Kanotix Thorhammer, if you try that be sure to click on the IRC icon and ask for instructions, dmraid installs are possible but for example you can not use gparted to partition it. Also best to use some other tricks like GRUB4DOS when you want to do a dual boot system on raid (and install bootloader into partition). No Ubuntu kernel has ever had the needed dmraid 45 patch and the included dmraid of course would not load the extra module even if present. U is in that way pretty stupid

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Initial build tips

                              I bought a GA-P35-DS3P for my second build, in no small part because of this
                              review (the OSx86 community also loves this board), so this seems a handy
                              place to put some initial build gotchas.

                              [1] Only a PS/2 keyboard can be used to access the BIOS, to turn on USB
                              keyboards and mice. Then, a USB keyboard can be used e.g. with the Ubuntu
                              Server install disk. Otherwise, one determines that one's USB isn't fried by
                              using the Ubuntu Desktop install disk, which defaults to booting to live disk
                              if it doesn't hear from you. One may need to keep the PS/2 keyboard handy for
                              future BIOS work, as it is picky about USB keyboards even after changing this
                              setting.

                              [2] My Corsair TWIN2X4096-6400C4DHX 2 x 2 GB memory (2.1v 800 4-4-4-12, but
                              800 5-5-5-18 in SPD) failed memtest+ (don't use the copy on a Ubuntu disk, get
                              the latest from www.memtest.org) with my f1 BIOS. The latest BIOS is now f2.
                              The download is a Windows .exe, so unpacking it gave me my first productive
                              use ever of my virtual Windows on my Mac. I couldn't update from a USB flash
                              drive, contrary to the documentation. Formatting an internal Sata drive to a
                              single FAT32 partition, and putting the unpacked BIOS files on it, did the
                              trick nicely and very swiftly. I had far less trouble with my memory in the f2
                              BIOS at default settings, 1 error in an hour rather than hundreds. I then
                              manually set 2.1V, 4-4-4-12, and as I write I'm an hour into testing with no
                              faults.

                              TIP: When you take your shiny new SATA drive (Raptor, anyone?) out of its OEM
                              pouch, DO NOT PASS GO, DO NOT COLLECT $200. Immediately attach it to an
                              already working machine, format it FAT32, and copy on the updated BIOS files.
                              NOW install the drive in your build. Flash the latest BIOS as soon as you can,
                              to save hours of your life, and while the mobo is still returnable. It will go
                              fine.

                              (In my case, the memory instability crashed my first install, leaving the hard
                              disk in an unsettled state, causing the BIOS to hang on reboots until the
                              drive was disconnected. So removing it to give it a clean temporary format
                              killed two birds with one stone.)

                              If this post saved you a few hours of your life, allow me to rant a moment. I
                              haven't checked the language rules for this forum, so you'll just have to
                              imagine a calm, exceedingly tenacious guy turned so furious spewing
                              obscenities that his brains are hemorrhaging out his eyeballs.

                              What gives with [1] and [2]? Perhaps in Taiwan a Windows-centric attitude
                              isn't seen as the equivalent of a whites-only drinking fountain, but this has
                              me steamed.

                              The big picture is what really bothers me here. When a GB of flash memory goes
                              on sale for $8, which could hold THREE decent Linux distributions, where does
                              this industry get off with 1980's BIOS code that's in the MS-DOS reading
                              group?

                              I mean, there's room for code that reasons [insert Homer code voice:]

                              "Huh. We've got USB devices disabled, but it's been MINUTES, and Marge, I
                              haven't heard a peep out of that PS/2 port. Oh yeah, the hard disk seems
                              corrupt, should I just freeze like I'm as stupid as an Adirondack deer? Oh
                              yeah, those USB ports keep getting insert events like someone's going around
                              trying all of them, thinking he blew the wiring. Should we turn one on as a
                              courtesy? Keep moving it, keep him guessing. Oh! Oh! Marge... Ya know that
                              stealth OSx86-ready micro-iSight next to the mobo LEDs? The guys got the cover
                              off, see that case intrusion sensor, and he's LOOKING at us. Oh Marge,
                              jeesh!!! he's got a sledge hammer and he looks mad. He's raising it.. Marge,
                              turn on the USB! turn on the USB!"


                              I expect nothing less than BIOS code like this. Why are we all lemmings that
                              accept less?

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X