Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Google Does Sandy/Ivy Bridge In Coreboot For Chrome OS

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Google Does Sandy/Ivy Bridge In Coreboot For Chrome OS

    Phoronix: Google Does Sandy/Ivy Bridge In Coreboot For Chrome OS

    Google has committed to the open-source Coreboot BIOS implementation support for Cougar/Panther Point chipsets as found with Intel's Sandy Bridge and soon-to-launch Ivy Bridge processors. Google's planning to use Coreboot in conjunction with these newer Intel CPUs for future Chrome OS hardware to result in a very fast boot time...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTA4Mjg

  • #2
    yay

    So we will be able to install another Linux distribution and wipe ChromeOS entirely on future Chromebooks?
    I would love that, because the Samsung Chromebooks have a 16:10 aspect ratio.

    Comment


    • #3
      I completely killed a Lenovo Ideapad S205 using efibootmgr to clean up to boot priorities. Twice. That's how much I love UEFI.

      Nice move, Google!

      Comment


      • #4
        * squeal* OMG, THIS IS AWESOME!!!

        Seriously, awesome.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by d2kx View Post
          I completely killed a Lenovo Ideapad S205 using efibootmgr to clean up to boot priorities. Twice. That's how much I love UEFI.

          Nice move, Google!
          As far as I know, the EFI settings, including the efibootmgr boot order, are stored in the nvram. On my W520, I could always "fix" the UEFI by resetting the nvram by removing the time battery and holding the power button in 10 5-second intervals.

          Anyway, I do agree that this is a good move

          Comment


          • #6
            First Linux on phones. Then Android Nexus unlocked bootloader phones. After that VP8 for WebM patents release to oppose h264 in HTMLv5 and now Coreboot.

            I'm not a huge fan of Google's data mining, but they can operate for years to come if they go on being awesome like this. And don't forget GSoC.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by V!NCENT View Post
              First Linux on phones. Then Android Nexus unlocked bootloader phones. After that VP8 for WebM patents release to oppose h264 in HTMLv5 and now Coreboot.

              I'm not a huge fan of Google's data mining, but they can operate for years to come if they go on being awesome like this. And don't forget GSoC.
              If someone thinks that in this digital world, no one would want to know/record peoples behavior, needs to put the pink glasses down.
              Data mining is not done only by google, ask VISA, GSM operators, and so on.
              I personally have nothing to hide, and I am very happy that google is led by technology men, who actually want to make the world better place (green energy, space elevator, self-driving cars, linux, coreboot, etc.).

              Comment


              • #8
                Would be cool if it works on P8Z68-V, this UEFI system already takes 10s or a bit more till it beeps...

                Comment


                • #9
                  Sure it's not only Google who does this, but that doesn't mean that I have to like it.

                  Privacy doesn't mean hiding things; it means controling what you want to share with the rest of the world. It's not that everyone who doesn't want to share their toilet dump on YouTube/Vimeo has something to hide. I believe you've got the privacy thing wrong.

                  That UEFI booting is, like all BIOSes today, mostly DRM that means unencrypting certain parts first before the post screen comes up. This is the sole reason I dislike BIOSes for the most part. But what's also sucking about UEFI is that it's a whole OS in itself that uses drivers. Now the Bluetooth part isn't so bad for when you want to controll the BIOS with a bluetooth keyboard, but I don't need two OSes running at the same time when all I want is Linux or Windows running.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    That's nice and all, but what will be the payload of Coreboot? ChromeOS itself? If so, then, from what I understood about Coreboot, installing a different OS will be somewhat difficult, as you have to change the payload, in which case you have to flash the firmware. Of course, that beats locked bootloaders, but still is a form of inconvenience.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X