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NVIDIA Wins Over AMD For Linux Gaming Ultra HD 4K Performance

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  • NVIDIA Wins Over AMD For Linux Gaming Ultra HD 4K Performance

    Phoronix: NVIDIA Wins Over AMD For Linux Gaming Ultra HD 4K Performance

    As it's been a while since last delivering any "4K" resolution OpenGL benchmarks at Phoronix, out today -- now that we're done with our massive 60+ GPU open-source testing and 35-way proprietary driver comparison -- are benchmarks of several NVIDIA GeForce and AMD Radeon graphics cards when running an assortment of Linux games and other OpenGL tests at the 4K resolution.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=20577

  • #2
    r7 260x(~129$) in most tests >= 750ti(~149$). Where is Nvidia wins?

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    • #3
      When running Valve's Counter-Strike: Source at 3840 x 2160, the graphics cards that couldn't deliver at least a 60 FPS average were the GTX 650, GT 740, and GTX 750 Ti.
      I think you meant GTX 750 instead of GTX 750 TI.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Pontostroy View Post
        r7 260x(~129$) in most tests >= 750ti(~149$). Where is Nvidia wins?
        I counted 5 tests where the 750 TI performed better than the R7 260x, and 3 the other way around. In general they seem to perform about equally. So it really depends where your priorities lie: a lower investment (€130 vs €110, 18% cheaper) or a lower energy usage (TDP 70W vs 115W, 50% higher energy usage).


        P.S. Talking about the 2GB version of the 260x, of course. The 1GB version would performance much worse at high resolutions.

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        • #5
          The 750Ti is definitely worth the $20 "premium"

          Originally posted by Pontostroy View Post
          r7 260x(~129$) in most tests >= 750ti(~149$). Where is Nvidia wins?
          We might "save" $20 off the retail price, but we would pay for the decision many times over for the life of the card.
          • The 260X with almost double the TDP (60W vs 115W) might take an additional $20 in additional electricity over its life.
          • If we have to update your power supply to use it, then the 750Ti is a no-brainer, as we aren't going to do that for less than $20.
          • Capabilities provided by the 750Ti (stability, best-in-class OGL4.4, multi-year support, CUDA, openCL perf)
          • If the Ti saves us an hour in fiddling with configurations over its life, we definitely come out ahead (assuming we value our time > $20/hr). I have 100% confidence, based on extensive experience, that we would spend definitely less using NV.

          Prototype Steamboxes seem to prefer 750Ti's over 260X's for all the reasons listed above.

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          • #6
            Uhn, I could make a quad crossfire of R9 270x (~200$ each) for the price of a single GTX 780 Ti (~800$).
            Sure, Nvidia "wins".

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            • #7
              Originally posted by atari314 View Post
              Uhn, I could make a quad crossfire of R9 270x (~200$ each) for the price of a single GTX 780 Ti (~800$).
              Sure, Nvidia "wins".
              Do you have any benchmarks of a quad-crossfire R9 270x setup? Because it will most certainly not perform 4 times a single 270x.
              And I also think that a 780 TI will consume less electricity.

              In the end people buying a top-end GTX 780 TI don't really care all that much about price/performance ratio's.

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              • #8
                Actually they do...

                Originally posted by clementl View Post
                ... In the end people buying a top-end GTX 780 TI don't really care all that much about price/performance ratio's.
                Actually, I think most of us do. Just some value time, productivity, and reliability more than others.

                How much time and hassle is it to configure and install a quad-crossfire 260x rig? Lost me there already - my time is more valuable than that. GTX780Ti it is.

                Life advice: Drive a sensible car so you can afford kick-ass tech.

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                • #9
                  I wonder how not being able to tell a pixel apart from its neighbor makes a game more fun

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                  • #10
                    Slightly OT: Does anyone know if you can downsample on Linux? I'd love to run a 4K Res on my 1440p monitor in games.

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