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AMD tops Nvidia in graphics chip shipments

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  • #16
    Originally posted by movieman View Post
    As far as I remember, AMD's fabs couldn't possibly make enough chips to supply 70% of the market at that time?
    Well, then it's actually a good thing that intel prevented OEMs from using AMD hardware through ilegal monopolizing tactis, or else AMD would be in a tight spot!

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    • #17
      Originally posted by devius View Post
      Well, then it's actually a good thing that intel prevented OEMs from using AMD hardware through ilegal monopolizing tactis, or else AMD would be in a tight spot!
      More likely, the OEMs were dangling the threat of AMD design wins in order to get concessions from Intel, knowing that they'd never have to ship those AMD systems.

      I may be wrong, but I remember reading at the time that AMD was selling every single CPU they could produce, and I'm sure I remember some OEMs complaining that they couldn't get enough AMD chips.

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      • #18
        intel paid AMD a billion just to drop the cases about Intel's shady practices. And the EU and FTC are still going after Intel. Intel played dirty. Very, very dirty.

        And Nvidia's x86 dreams? Will become a nightmare if they ever release such a chip. There are licences hold by AMD, Intel, VIA and NATSEMI. And then there are patents, hold by the same four. Nvidia doesn't have either.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by movieman View Post
          More likely, the OEMs were dangling the threat of AMD design wins in order to get concessions from Intel, knowing that they'd never have to ship those AMD systems.
          You're probably right. Whatever it was, I'm sure no one was thinking in the consumer's best interests though. What was the topic anyway? Oh yeah, the HD5000 series is a good product that launched at the right time and that alone may explain this advantage in shipments.

          PS: I still use an nForce2 motherboard on a small server nachine. I really miss more choice in the chipset business. ION2 is probably a no-no on linux due to it using optimus. Anyone tried this?

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          • #20
            Originally posted by energyman View Post
            intel paid AMD a billion just to drop the cases about Intel's shady practices. And the EU and FTC are still going after Intel. Intel played dirty. Very, very dirty.

            And Nvidia's x86 dreams? Will become a nightmare if they ever release such a chip. There are licences hold by AMD, Intel, VIA and NATSEMI. And then there are patents, hold by the same four. Nvidia doesn't have either.
            x86 in itself could be considered a monopoly, as if you want to build -any- x86 chip you have to pay Intel, and if you want something with any real performance you have to further pay Intel and also AMD.

            It isn't just Intel that is shady- the integrity of the whole industry is almost beyond repair. I don't see any architecture competition in the desktop industry- and I don't see any competition in the high performance workstation area either. You used to see SPARC and POWER boxes all over the place, now nothing but x86.

            There's hope in ARM- ARM looks like it could displace x86 with a few more nudges. Unfortunately there is almost as much of a patent hold on that architecture as x86- the key difference being the main patent holder isn't actually putting out chips.

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            • #21
              no. x86 has 4 companies holding licences and at least 5 who are allowed to produce x86 chips. POWER on the other hand - nobody but IBM is to allowed to design or make POWER chips. And Sparc? Oracle, Fujitsu and that was the whole range.

              x86 is very non-monopolistic compared to those. And if you want to make a x86 chip you not only have to pay Intel, but AMD, Via and NatSemi to.

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              • #22
                National Semi sold off their x86 lines quite some time ago to Via and AMD.

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                • #23
                  true, but they still have patents and licences. Nvidia has neither.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by energyman View Post
                    true, but they still have patents and licences. Nvidia has neither.
                    The patents went with the sales IIRC and the license has expired.

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                    • #25
                      Also it depends on the features one wants as to who gets a piece of the pie. A x86 chip could only require a license from intel. A x86-64 chip however would require a license as well from AMD. One from Via would only really be required if you desired to implement such additional features like Padlock.

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                      • #26
                        The other thing to remember as well is many of the patents are coming upon their expiry date. Anything found in a 486 and older has its patents expired already and patents for the pentium and MMX are soon to follow. Patents before June 8 / 1995 have a 17 year limit any thing after that has a 20 year limit.

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                        • #27
                          copyright has no such short term expiration period ... and even if you can make a pentium mmx equivalent - what do you get? Some very slow, very outdated, very power hungry (in terms of performace/watt) CPU.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by energyman View Post
                            copyright has no such short term expiration period ... and even if you can make a pentium mmx equivalent - what do you get? Some very slow, very outdated, very power hungry (in terms of performace/watt) CPU.
                            WTH does copywrite have to do with it? It's not like they would advertise a x86 chip as a "Pentium".

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                            • #29
                              well, I don't think that you can patent something like SSE2/3/4. But you can have a copyright...

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by energyman View Post
                                well, I don't think that you can patent something like SSE2/3/4. But you can have a copyright...
                                Actually it is the other way around. SSE2/3/4 are instruction sets ion the hardware and are patented, not copywrited. Copywrites apply to written word (or code).

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